lionise

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v lionise assign great social importance to "The film director was celebrated all over Hollywood","The tenor was lionized in Vienna"
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • lionise See lionize.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Lionise to treat as a lion or object of interest
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. lion—L. leon-em—Gr. leōn; Ger. löwe.

Usage

In literature:

He was acknowledged, fawned upon, in a way lionised.
"Sister Carrie" by Theodore Dreiser
He was acknowledged, fawned upon, in a way lionised.
"Sister Carrie" by Theodore Dreiser
He had no wish to be lionised.
"The Weavers, Complete" by Gilbert Parker
Further on they stumbled over a small boy from the charity school who wished to lionise them over the whole building.
"The History of David Grieve" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
In Paris and London especially he was lionised to the top of his bent.
"Chambers's Edinburgh Journal Vol. XVII. No. 418. New Series." by William and Robert Chambers
But he was never lionised.
"The Lion's Share" by E. Arnold Bennett
Did he want to marry you, or only to lionise you?
"Charlotte Bronte and Her Circle" by Clement K. Shorter
Come along, my boy," said Lionise; "I'll introduce you at once to the whole party, and then you can make your own selection.
"The English Spy" by Bernard Blackmantle
They tried to lionise me in drawing rooms and make me talk for their entertainment.
"The Shrieking Pit" by Arthur J. Rees
Mr Fordyce, before lionising the place with Nowell, assisted me in making all possible inquiries for Mr Coventry and Alfred.
"My First Voyage to Southern Seas" by W.H.G. Kingston
***

In news:

WorldCom's Bernie Ebbers typified the lionised chief executive.
***