licorice

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n licorice a black candy flavored with the dried root of the licorice plant
    • n licorice deep-rooted coarse-textured plant native to the Mediterranean region having blue flowers and pinnately compound leaves; widely cultivated in Europe for its long thick sweet roots
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Every year, more than one million miles of Twizzlers licorice is made
    • Licorice (Bot) A plant of the genus Glycyrrhiza Glycyrrhiza glabra), the root of which abounds with a sweet juice, and is much used in demulcent compositions.
    • Licorice The inspissated juice of licorice root, used as a confection and for medicinal purposes.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Another name for licorice is "Sweet Wood" or "Spanish Juice."
    • n licorice A leguminous plant, Glycyrrhiza glabra, whose root yields the licorice of commerce. It is a perennial herbaceous plant growing 4 or 5 feet high, sparingly branched, with pinnate leaves and bluish pea-like flowers in spikes. The roots grow several feet long and an inch or more thick. Other plants of the genus are also called licorice.
    • n licorice An economic product, either the root of this plant or an extract from it. The former is called licorice-root or licorice; the latter is called stick-licorice, Spanish juice, or Italian extract of licorice, and is obtained by boiling the crushed root and evaporating the infusion, the residuum being rolled into sticks. The substance thus secured is dry and brittle, with a shining fracture, and when pure is entirely soluble in water, but is often grossly adulterated. Licorice is used medicinally chiefly as a demulcent, especially iu bronchial affections. It is also employed in making confectionery, in brewing, and in the manufacture of tobacco. The extract is prepared extensively in Mediterranean Europe, and latterly in the United States from imported root.
    • n licorice The plant also called rest-harrow, Ononis arvensis. Its root is used by children in place of licorice.
    • n licorice In America, a member of the true licorice genus, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, found chiefly far north-west; also, Galium circæzans and G. lanceolatum, on account of a sweetish root.
    • n licorice In Australia, Teucrium corymbosum, a sort of germander.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In 1976, the first eight Jelly Belly® flavors were launched: Orange, Green Apple, Root Beer, Very Cherry, Lemon, Cream Soda, Grape, and Licorice.
    • Licorice Same as Liquorice.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky`rriza; glyky`s sweet + "ri`za root. Cf. Glycerin Glycyrrhiza Wort

Usage

In literature:

Sellers of licorice water shouted their cool drinks.
"Library of the World's Best Mystery and Detective Stories" by Edited by Julian Hawthorne
Extract of licorice, 32 gr.
"Searchlights on Health: Light on Dark Corners" by B.G. Jefferis
They must look like licorice-drops in milk.
"The Governess" by Julie M. Lippmann
Belasez, long years ago, Licorice thy mother did me a cruel wrong.
"Earl Hubert's Daughter" by Emily Sarah Holt
For that matter, if they came right over, he would take back the tissue-paper and substitute licorice sticks.
"Emmy Lou" by George Madden Martin
Anyway, it was in the night and everything was as dark as licorice bars.
"Roy Blakeley's Bee-line Hike" by Percy Keese Fitzhugh
I lingered behind to offer him a suck of a piece of licorice I had.
"Explorers of the Dawn" by Mazo de la Roche
Or one could do worse than licorice.
"Chimney-Pot Papers" by Charles S. Brooks
His shirt-front and cuffs were white frosting, and the buttons on his coat were licorice drops.
"The Road to Oz" by L. Frank Baum
It tastes a little like tapioca with a slight flavoring of licorice.
"Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts" by Girl Scouts
He held up the licorice-stick and traced a wavery little line round it with his finger-nail.
"The Very Small Person" by Annie Hamilton Donnell
When used in this way, something like licorice is generally mixed with the tobacco to give it a more pleasant taste.
"Health Lessons" by Alvin Davison
Upon this platform, in a great tub filled with licorice tea, is set a small image of the infant Buddha.
"Japanese Girls and Women" by Alice Mabel Bacon
It includes brush grass, reeds, and licorice.
"Area Handbook for Bulgaria" by Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole
One Big League manager used always to give his men licorice or some other dark and adhesive and juicy substance to chew on a dingy day.
"Pitching in a Pinch" by Christy Mathewson
This beverage was made by shaking up a piece of licorice in water.
"Just William" by Richmal Crompton
I requisitioned all the licorice in Morny.
"Six Women and the Invasion" by Gabrielle Yerta
It was of a sweetish flavor of licorice that was not unpleasant.
"Hints to Pilgrims" by Charles Stephen Brooks
After standing for the space of one hour, strain; then add a gill of honey and an ounce of powdered licorice or slippery elm.
"The American Reformed Cattle Doctor" by George Dadd
She was speechless, because she had just crammed an entire licorice 'shoe-string' into her mouth.
"Atlantic Narratives" by Mary Antin
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In news:

California health officials are warning consumers not to eat black licorice twist candies made by Red Vines because they contain too much lead.
MICHELE BENDER Licorice speaks about owner's obedience training.
They say adults 40 and older should be careful about eating too much black licorice .
Four black licorices that pass the test.
Our band is like licorice .
UNION CITY, Calif (AP) — Officials are warning consumers against eating black licorice candy produced by a California company because it contains high levels of lead.
These licorice portraits look good enough to eat.
Black licorice recalled due to high lead levels.
Officials are warning consumers against eating black licorice candy produced by a California company because it contains high levels of lead.
Not one but two black licorice makers tested for too much lead.
My least favorite candy is black licorice .
This Halloween, don't eat too much black licorice because it might be trying to kill you.
) of Red Vines® Black Licorice Twists with a "Best Before Date" of 020413 are affected by this recall.
Another reason that lollipops are more favorable than candy or gum is because lollipops last longer and therefore the licorice stays in the mouth for a longer period, making it more effective.
Using the licorice in gum or candy does not have the same advantage that lollipops have.
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