lectern

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n lectern desk or stand with a slanted top used to hold a text at the proper height for a lecturer
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Lectern A choir desk, or reading desk, in some churches, from which the lections, or Scripture lessons, are chanted or read.
    • Lectern A reading desk, usually in the form of a stand with a slanted top that holds books or lecture notes at a height convenient for reading by a speaker who is standing. A modern lectern may be of adjustable height, and be fitted with a light to illuminate the material on the desk, and sometimes a microphone or other electrical equipment for use of a speaker.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n lectern A reading-desk in a church; especially, the desk from which the lessons are read at daily prayer. In cathedrals it usually stands in the middle of the choir, but in parish churches at the choir-step or just without the rood-screen. It is ordinarily of wood or brass and movable, but sometimes of stone and flxed. The name is also given sometimes to the precentor's desk in front of the pulpit in the Scotch Presbyterian churches.
    • n lectern A writing-desk or -table.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Lectern lek′tėrn a reading-desk in churches from which the Scripture lessons are read
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. lectrinum, fr. lectrum,; cf. L. legere, lectum, to read
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Low L. lectrinum—Low L. lectrum, a pulpit—Gr. lektron, a couch.

Usage

In literature:

Mrs. Fleming, Meg, Monty, and Neale were standing by the lectern when she appeared.
"A harum-scarum schoolgirl" by Angela Brazil
Dean Stanley was one of many clergymen present, and occupied a seat just in front of the lectern.
"Faces and Places" by Henry William Lucy
Book-lectern used in private houses.
"The Care of Books" by John Willis Clark
They were all that he could do in the way of pulpit, desk, and lectern.
"Stingaree" by E. W. (Ernest William) Hornung
Bosses and other raised metal work should be restricted to books that will be used on lecterns or reading desks.
"Bookbinding, and the Care of Books" by Douglas Cockerell
By the king's side is the figure of a queen kneeling before a lectern.
"The Cornwall Coast" by Arthur L. Salmon
The brass lectern was erected in 1888 in memory of Bishop Claughton.
"Chelsea" by G. E. (Geraldine Edith) Mitton
The lectern stands on the other side of the ante-chancel, representing Christ blessing little children.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 488, May 9, 1885" by Various
Most of them were kept chained to the lecterns or desks of the churches; sometimes even to the pillars.
"Paul and the Printing Press" by Sara Ware Bassett
At once, she perceived her husband by the lectern.
"The Scarlet Feather" by Houghton Townley
They did half of the choir of La Badia in 1501-2, and the very elaborate lectern.
"Intarsia and Marquetry" by F. Hamilton Jackson
The choir sittings are of carved modern oak; the pulpit is also of the same, on a stone base, and the lectern.
"A History of Horncastle from the earliest period to the present time" by James Conway Walter
Who decorated the lectern; who the finials; who did the windows this year?
"Lady Cassandra" by Mrs George de Horne Vaizey
The lectern was the work of Bartolome Morel.
"Southern Spain" by A.F. Calvert
There are beautiful examples of brass lecterns at Magdalene and Merton Colleges, Oxford, in most of our cathedrals, and many parish churches.
"Stones of the Temple" by Walter Field
Here on this central spot, a lectern was placed, at which the sub-deacon at Solemn Masses sang the Epistle.
"Mellifont Abbey, Co. Louth" by Anonymous
King Edward VII gave the new pulpit Bible, and President Roosevelt provided the lectern.
"Historic Shrines of America" by John T. (John Thomson) Faris
And so, after a time, with his head still against the lectern, he slept the sleep of exhaustion.
"In the Permanent Way" by Flora Annie Steel
At that moment they stood, with their backs to the body of the church, studying the lectern.
"The Following of the Star" by Florence L. Barclay
The lectern yielded an oil-ball like that the ape-man had given him and another, similar device, containing grease.
"The Onslaught from Rigel" by Fletcher Pratt
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In news:

And while you tuck into your victuals, pictures of boats and black dogs spotting the walls, a bearded man with glasses and an ever present smile steps to the lectern.
The magazine cover shows two dark-haired males, one in his 40s, the other in his teens, both wearing prayer shawls and yarmulkes and both poring over a Torah on a lectern.
Getty Images A van containing, the Presidents teleprompter and lectern were stolen from a hotel parking lot in Virginia.
The early theremins were about the size of a lectern.
INDIANAPOLIS — Bruce Arians had a good 15 minutes to collect both himself and his thoughts before standing behind the lectern Monday morning.
On the morning of June 26, 2000, in front of a crowd of VIP s in the East Room of the White House, President Clinton strode to a lectern and declared it a "day for the ages".
There was a lectern waiting for.
Readers, however, won't find themselves on the other side of the lectern.
Marcell Dareus didn't stand at the lectern at One Bills Drive as much as he loomed.
Da-Lite Screen Co.'s Euro Deluxe Lectern.
Standing at the lectern in a packed banquet hall, Arkansas State Coach Gus Malzahn cracked a joked about the Red Wolves' evolution during his first season.
Da-Lite added an iPod dock to its line of Oravisual Lecterns.
Designed to accommodate new technologies that can be applied to presentations, such as the iPod and iPhone, the universal dock accessory is recessed into the reading surface of any Da-Lite lectern.
The City Council speaker, Christine C Quinn, at the lectern, and other officials in Hudson River Park on Sunday warned of an increase in rapes.
Use promotional code REFRESH20 now until December 31, 2012 and receive a 20-percent discount on your lectern.
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