laurel

Definitions

  • RHODODENDRON OR GREAT LAUREL
    RHODODENDRON OR GREAT LAUREL
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n laurel (antiquity) a wreath of laurel foliage worn on the head as an emblem of victory
    • n Laurel United States slapstick comedian (born in England) who played the scatterbrained and often tearful member of the Laurel and Hardy duo who made many films (1890-1965)
    • n laurel any of various aromatic trees of the laurel family
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The first place winners at the first modern Olympics were awarded an olive branch and a silver medal. The runners-up received laurel sprigs and copper medals.
    • Laurel A crown of laurel; hence, honor; distinction; fame; -- especially in the plural; as, to win laurels .
    • Laurel An English gold coin made in 1619, and so called because the king's head on it was crowned with laurel.
    • Laurel (Bot) An evergreen shrub, of the genus Laurus Laurus nobilis), having aromatic leaves of a lanceolate shape, with clusters of small, yellowish white flowers in their axils; -- called also sweet bay.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n laurel The bay-tree or bay-laurel, Laurus nobilis. This is the true laurel of the ancients and the poets.
    • n laurel Any species of the genus Laurus.
    • n laurel Any one of many diverse plants whose leaves suggest those of the true laurel. In English gardens the common laurel, or cherry-laurel, more properly laurel-cherry, is Prunus Lauro-Cerasus (see cherry); the Portugal laurel is P. Lusitanica. The copse-, spurge-, or wood-laurel of England is Daphne Laureola. American laurel is the genus Kalmia, including the mountain-laurel of the eastern United States (K. latifolia), the lambkill or sheep-laurel (K. angustifolia), and the pale laurel or swamp-laurel (K. glauca). (See cut under Kalmia.) The great laurel of the same region is the rosebay, Rhododendron maximum; and the ground-laurel is the trailing arbutus, Epigœa repens. (See cut under Epigœa.) The white laurel, another swamp-laurel, of the Atlantic coast and the South, is Magnolia glauca, also called sweetbay. Further south the big laurel, or bull-bay, is Magnolia grandiflora. The Carolina cherry-laurel is Prunus Caroliniana. The California laurel or bay-tree, the mountain-laurel of the West, is Umbellularia Californica. The West Indian laurel is Prunus occidentalis; the seaside laurel of the same locality comprises Phyllanthus latifolius, P. falcatus, and P. linearis. The Japanese laurel, cultivated in several varieties, is Aucuba Japonica of the dogwood family. The Tasmanian laurel is Anopterus glandulosus.
    • n laurel A crown of laurel; hence, honors acquired; claims to or tokens of distinction or glory: often in the plural: as, to win laurels in battle.
    • n laurel An English gold coin worth 20 shillings, or about 5 dollars, first issued in 1619 by James I.: so called because the head of the king was wreathed with laurel, and not crowned, as on earlier English coins. It was also called broad, unite, and jacobus. See cut under broad, n.
    • n laurel A salmon which has remained in fresh water during the summer.
    • laurel Pertaining to or consisting of laurel: as, a laurel wreath.
    • n laurel In Porto Rico, Mexico, and Central America, a name applied to many species of Ocoted, Damburneya, and allied genera of Lauraceæ; especially, in Porto Rico, to Ocotea fœniculacea, O. floribunda, Damburneya Sintenisii (Nectandra Sintenisii of Mez), D. Krugii (Nectandra Krugii of Mez), and D. coriacea (Nectandra coriacea of Grisebach).
    • n laurel The Victorian laurel, Pittosporum undulatum. Also called mock-orange.
    • n laurel A tree of the ginseng family, Polyscias elegans, yielding a light, soft wood. Also called white sycamore.
    • n laurel The American laurel.
    • n laurel The oleander.
    • n laurel The laurel-magnolia, Magnolia Virginiana.
    • laurel To crown with, or as with, laurel as a distinction.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Laurel law′rel the bay-tree, used by the ancients for making honorary wreaths: a crown of laurel, honours gained (freq. in pl.): any species of the genus Laurus
    • ***

Quotations

  • Carl Rowan
    Carl Rowan
    “Nothing wilts faster than laurels that have been rested upon.”
  • William Blake
    William%20Blake
    “The strongest poison ever known came from Caesar's laurel crown.”
  • Henry Giles
    Henry Giles
    “Literature, as a field of glory, is an arena where a tomb may be more easily found than laurels; and as a means of support, it is the chance of chances.”
  • Oscar Wilde
    Oscar%20Wilde
    “Popularity is the crown of laurel which the world puts on bad art. Whatever is popular is wrong.”
  • Julie Krone
    Julie Krone
    “With racing, you never rest on your laurels, and there are no counterfeits.”
  • Douglas Macarthur
    Douglas%20Macarthur
    “Whether in chains or in laurels, liberty knows nothing but victories.”

Idioms

Rest on your laurels - If someone rests on their laurels, they rely on their past achievements, rather than trying to achieve things now.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. lorel, laurer, lorer, OF. lorier, laurier, F. laurier, (assumed) LL. Laurarius, fr. L. laurus,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. laurier—L. laurus.

Usage

In literature:

UNDER THE LAUREL BUSH.
"A World of Girls" by L. T. Meade
That was why he gazed with wistful eyes at that laurel clump, so vivid in the pouring rays.
"The House with the Green Shutters" by George Douglas Brown
Jane plucked the laurel and crowned herself.
"The Creators" by May Sinclair
Among the laurels of a garden beyond field batteries were in position.
"Waiting for Daylight" by Henry Major Tomlinson
And yet to these fine things we must submit Our Reason, Arms, our Laurels, and our Wit.
"The Works of Aphra Behn" by Aphra Behn
Their inclination was either to rest on their laurels or to make haste slowly.
"Lord John Russell" by Stuart J. Reid
A statue of the prize-winner was placed in the school and crowned with laurel.
"Little Folks (October 1884)" by Various
She was dead, and Dick buried her himself, under a laurel tree in his garden.
"Dick and His Cat and Other Tales" by Various
They would make ready and flee with their possessions, and be lost in the laurel once again.
"Heart of the Blue Ridge" by Waldron Baily
Our enterprise is ruined, and we shall be stopped this winter at the Laurel Hills.
"From Farm House to the White House" by William M. Thayer
They circled back of the ruined stockade and raked the rising laurel tangles with searching scrutiny.
"The Roof Tree" by Charles Neville Buck
No school laurels for me.
"The Madcap of the School" by Angela Brazil
Mountain laurel Pink and white Rocky hills, damp soil.
"Harper's Young People, June 8, 1880" by Various
Boil a pint of new milk ten minutes, with a bit of lemon peel, a laurel leaf, four cloves, and a little sugar.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
A laurel leaf improves it greatly.
"The Lady's Own Cookery Book, and New Dinner-Table Directory;" by Charlotte Campbell Bury
A ledge formed by a ship's chain surmounts the net, and above this is a profile of Mr. Cox circled with laurel.
"Presentation Pieces in the Museum of History and Technology" by Margaret Brown Klapthor
It was a crisis when there was a fair opening for new candidates for the laurel.
"The Poetical Works of William Collins" by William Collins
He seated himself upon a jutting rock well screened by laurel shrubs on all sides but the one toward the fall.
"The Mountain Girl" by Payne Erskine
Rome's ghost revived in beauty for him and put a laurel on his brow.
"Historia Amoris: A History of Love, Ancient and Modern" by Edgar Saltus
Life goes marching on, who shall claim the laurel wreath that time cannot wither?
"A Novelist on Novels" by W. L. George
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In poetry:

Nought but bright prophetic laurel!
Laurel over eyes and brows,
Over limbs and over bosom,
Laurel leaves and laurel boughs!
"Daphne" by George Meredith
Thou, thy country's call obeying,
Hast her battles nobly fought;
And, thy ready zeal repaying,
See, she gives the laurels sought.
"To Henry, Written to a Russian Air" by Amelia Opie
And as there plenty grows
Of laurel everywhere,
Apollo's sacred tree,
You may it see
A poet's brows
To crown, that may sing there.
"To The Virginian Voyage" by Michael Drayton
The laurels and loves that await
The Hero returned from the strife,
And the widows that stand at the gate
Loveless and lonely for life.
"A Te Deum" by Alfred Austin
Smart lad, to slip betimes away
From fields where glory does not stay
And early though the laurel grows
It withers quicker than the rose.
"XIX: To an Athlete Dying Young" by A E Housman
“Every time that thou rejoicest,
And thy breast with pleasure heaves,
Then that moment is my coffin
Lin’d with rose and laurel leaves.
"Aager And Eliza (From The Old Danish)" by George Borrow

In news:

DeSoto's former water overseer shifts to Laurel.
Former water treatment overseer now in Laurel.
(Photo courtesy Kelly Clem) The Clem family, l to r: Kelly, Dale, Laurel, and Sarah Clem.
Patois 6078 Laurel St New Orleans, LA 70118.
Laurel Fagan and Peter Pecora , both of Lewistown, are engaged to be married on Sept 15 on the beach in Sandbridge, Va. She is the daughter of Robert and Susan Fagan, of McVeytown.
Magna strikes deal to avoid Pimlico , Laurel Park auction.
Mario Pino , in red, rides April's Foil during the first race at Laurel Park Dec 1.
Darts and Laurels — January / February 2009.
Authorities said two armed robbers struck at a business in Laurel.
Officer were called to the Popeye's restaurant in the 3300 block of Laurel Fort Meade Road at 11:53 pm Thursday.
QUITMAN — Quarterback Franklin Jones ran for 141 yards and passed for another 141 yards in leading the Quitman Panthers to a 55-20 win against the Laurel Tornadoes here Friday night.
Man fatally shot in Laurel-area apt.
While there may be no hope for another Led Zeppelin reunion, Robert Plant certainly isn't resting on his laurels.
Darts and Laurels — November / December 2007.
Laurel to The Principia Pilot.
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In science:

J Scott Carter, Daniel Jelsovsky, Seiichi Kamada, Laurel Langford, Masahico Saito, Quand le cohomology and state-sum invariants of knotted curves and surfaces, arXiv:math.
Rack and quandle homology
In Verfification and Validation for Modeling and Simulation in Computational Science and Engineering Applications, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, 2002.
Validation of the material point method and plasticity with Taylor impact tests
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