jaundice

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v jaundice affect with, or as if with, jaundice
    • v jaundice distort adversely "Jealousy had jaundiced his judgment"
    • n jaundice a rough and bitter manner
    • n jaundice yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes caused by an accumulation of bile pigment (bilirubin) in the blood; can be a symptom of gallstones or liver infection or anemia
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The major side effects from abusing anabolic steroids can include liver tumors and cancer, jaundice (yellowish pigmentation of skin, tissues, and body fluids), fluid retention, high blood pressure, increases in LDL (bad cholesterol), and decreases in HDL (good cholesterol). Other side effects include kidney tumors, severe acne, and trembling.
    • n Jaundice (Med) A morbid condition, characterized by yellowness of the eyes, skin, and urine, whiteness of the fæces, constipation, uneasiness in the region of the stomach, loss of appetite, and general languor and lassitude. It is caused usually by obstruction of the biliary passages and consequent damming up, in the liver, of the bile, which is then absorbed into the blood.
    • v. t Jaundice To affect with jaundice; to color by prejudice or envy; to prejudice. "The envy of wealth jaundiced his soul."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n jaundice In pathology, a morbid state characterized by the presence of bile-pigments in the blood, which gives rise to a yellow staining of the skin and the whites of the eyes and to a dark coloring of the urine. The stools are usually light in color, and there is more or less lassitude and loss of appetite. Xanthopsy, or yellow vision, occurs in some very rare instances. Also called icterus.
    • n jaundice Hence A state of feeling or emotion that colors the view or disorders the judgment, as jealousy, envy, and the like.
    • jaundice To affect with jaundice.
    • jaundice Hence To affect with prejudice or envy.
    • n jaundice Same as grasserie.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Jaundice jän′dis a disease, characterised by a yellowness of the eyes, skin, &c., caused by bile
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Quotations

  • John Dryden
    John%20Dryden
    “Jealousy is the jaundice of the soul.”
  • Alexander Pope
    Alexander%20Pope
    “All looks yellow to a jaundiced eye.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. jaunis, F. jaunisse, fr. jaune, yellow, orig. jalne, fr. L. galbinus, yellowish, fr. galbus, yellow
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. jaunisse, from jaune, yellow—L. galbinus, yellowish, galbus, yellow.

Usage

In literature:

For other causes of jaundice, see Class I.
"Zoonomia, Vol. II" by Erasmus Darwin
I shall get jaundice from all this bother.
"A Royal Prisoner" by Pierre Souvestre
Put from thee This jaundiced humour.
"Gycia" by Lewis Morris
The effect has been to reduce our once fairy and glistening hull to a jaundiced mass of rust and stains.
"In Eastern Seas" by J. J. Smith
The skin and whites of the eyes often take on the yellowish hue of jaundice.
"The Home Medical Library, Volume I (of VI)" by Various
His view was apt to be jaundiced, but he did not realize that.
"Rimrock Trail" by J. Allan Dunn
Honey, anti-scorbutics, bitters, and blisters applied to the region of the liver, have all been found serviceable in the cure of the jaundice.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
Let it not be supposed that I make this statement in jaundice or malice.
"The Book of Khalid" by Ameen Rihani
Remarks on the Pathology of Jaundice.
"North American Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3, July, 1826" by Various
It lost its clearness and became a jaundiced yellow in color: and also it grew peaked and drawn.
"The Passing of Ku Sui" by Anthony Gilmore
JAUNDICE (THE YELLOWS, OR CONGESTION OF THE LIVER).
"Special Report on Diseases of Cattle" by U.S. Department of Agriculture
There was jaundice in them bottoms.
"Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves" by Work Projects Administration
Young Lieutenant Commander Gilbertson gave her a somewhat jaundiced look.
"Industrial Revolution" by Poul William Anderson
They took great offence at this and were not content until they had vexed themselves into a jaundice.
"The Old Willow Tree and Other Stories" by Carl Ewald
The whites of his eyes were yellow too, as though he had suffered from jaundice.
"Aliens" by William McFee
Two only had a Jaundice remain after the Fever, and both were cured in a short Time.
"An Account of the Diseases which were most frequent in the British military hospitals in Germany" by Donald Monro
Jaundice, spider a cure for, 258.
"Folk-lore of Shakespeare" by Thomas Firminger Thiselton-Dyer
Phalloides poisoning is said to bear a marked resemblance to phosphorus poisoning and to acute jaundice.
"Student's Hand-book of Mushrooms of America, Edible and Poisonous" by Thomas Taylor
Bobby's attack of jaundice was soon over.
"Shadows of Flames" by Amelie Rives
To the mean eye all things are trivial, as certainly as to the jaundiced they are yellow.
"Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. VIII" by Various
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In poetry:

Fear not the jaundice-visag'd king,
Death can do nothing, but remove
(Since Christ has pluck'd away his sting)
Thee hence, unto the realms above.
"A Comfortable Conference Between A Pious Sick Man And His Soul, Against The Fear Of Death" by Rees Prichard
Friend Jonathan is just as fierce and spiteful—
The braggadocio would be quite delightful—
But loss of blood, and jaundiced bile, poor fellow,
Have made him giddy, and all objects yellow.
"November Findings--1862" by Janet Hamilton
Dry-eyed she waited by the sycamore.
Some stars made misty blotches in the sky.
And all the wretched willows on the shore
Looked faded as a jaundiced cheek or eye.
She felt their pity and could only sigh.
"The Parting" by Madison Julius Cawein
Sun-drenched beaches with their golden sands
were hidden under red carpets.
Sufferers from cowardice and jaundice
were subjected to severe administrative reassignment.
A protest campaign led by wasps and bees
had its sting drawn by honeyed words.
"The Commission for Equalising Things" by Raymond Queneau

In news:

Ultrasound reveals cause of jaundiced cat's ailment .
Adlin and Appleford Disappoint on 'Jaundice Bitters '.
And that may be what makes Jaundice Bitters a little too hard to swallow.
Rowland Brown directed only three movies, but if this 1933 crime melodrama is any indication, he had a masterful sense of story and a surprisingly jaundiced wit.
But cause of 'jaundice syndrome' still unknown.
Infant Jaundice Treatment May Encourage Moles.
Alexandr Dolgopolov tells the New Straits Times that he suffers from Gilbert's syndrome, a hereditary condition that affects the liver and causes repeated bouts of jaundice .
Your newborn might have jaundice .
For Neonatal Jaundice , a New Option in Resource-Poor Nations.
Autism linked to jaundice in newborns, study finds.
' Jaundice ' (JAWN-diss) is a yellow-orange discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes caused by the buildup of a substance called 'bilirubin' (bil-ih-ROO-bun).
Documentary 'Inside Job' casts a jaundiced eye at Wall Street as it examines 2008 financial crisis.
For Neonatal Jaundice, a New Option in Resource-Poor Nations.
Veterans of the last boom and bust take a more jaundiced view.
Fitch is taking a jaundiced view of whether or not consumer magazines as a group can make the switch to digital with their profitability intact.
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In science:

Chronic diseases or congenital defects of hepatobiliary organs result in depression of BA production. Obstructive jaundice or gallbladder excision completely stops their income to intestine.
Model of pathogenesis of psoriasis. Part 1. Systemic psoriatic process
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