iodine

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n iodine a tincture consisting of a solution of iodine in ethyl alcohol; applied topically to wounds as an antiseptic
    • n iodine a nonmetallic element belonging to the halogens; used especially in medicine and photography and in dyes; occurs naturally only in combination in small quantities (as in sea water or rocks)
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Iodine (Chem) A nonmetallic element, of the halogen group of atomic number 53, occurring always in combination, as in the iodides. When isolated it is in the form of dark gray metallic scales, resembling plumbago, soft but brittle, and emitting a chlorinelike odor. Symbol I. Atomic weight 126.90. If heated, iodine volatilizes in beautiful violet vapors.☞ Iodine was formerly obtained from the ashes of seaweed (kelp or varec), but is now also extracted from certain natural brines. In the free state, iodine, even in very minute quantities, colors starch blue. Iodine and its compounds are largely used in medicine (as in liniments, antisyphilitics, etc.), in photography, in the preparation of aniline dyes, and as an indicator in titration.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n iodine Chemical symbol, I; atomic weight, 126.9. In chem., a peculiar non-metallic elementary solid substance, forming one of the group of halogens. It exists in the water of the ocean and mineral springs, in marine mollusks, in seaweeds, and in the nitrate deposits of western South America. At ordinary temperatures it is a solid crystalline body. Its color is bluish-black or grayish-black, with a metallic luster. It is often in scales, resembling those of micaceous iron ore; sometimes in brilliant rhomboidal plates or in elongated octahedrons. The specific gravity of solid iodine is 4.947. It fuses at 225°F., and boils at 347°. Its vapor, which is very dense, is of an exceedingly rich violet color, a character to which it owes the name of iodine. It is a non-conductor of electricity, and, like oxygen and chlorin, is electronegative. It is very sparingly soluble in water, but dissolves copiously in alcohol and in ether, forming dark-brown liquids. It possesses strong powers of combination, and forms with the pure metals and most of the simple non-metallic substances compounds which are named iodides. With hydrogen and oxygen it forms iodic acid; combined with hydrogen it forms hydriodic acid. Like chlorin, it destroys vegetable colors, but with less energy. Iodine has a very acrid taste, and its odor somewhat resembles that of chlorin. It is an irritant poison, and is of great service in medicine. It is used externally as a counter-irritant, the skin or mucous membrane being painted with the tincture; and also internally, both as iodine and in combination, especially as iodide of potash. Starch is a characteristic test of iodine, forming with it a deep-blue compound. This test is so delicate that a solution of starch dropped into water containing less than a millionth part of iodine is tinged blue.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Iodine ī′o-din one of the four non-metallic elements, so named from the violet colour of its vapour
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. 'iw`dhs violetlike; 'i`on a violet + e'i^dos form: cf. F. iode, iodine,. The name was given from the violet color of its vapor. See Violet Idyl
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. ioeidēs, violet-coloured—ion, a violet, eidos, form.

Usage

In literature:

I've been to the Matron about it and she gave me some iodine.
"A Diversity of Creatures" by Rudyard Kipling
Free applications of arnica or iodine will have an excellent effect.
"Searchlights on Health" by B. G. Jefferis and J. L. Nichols
I'll put some tincture of iodine on your knuckles, however.
"Kindred of the Dust" by Peter B. Kyne
Dropping into the liquid a few flakes of iodine, you see the middle of the spectrum cut away.
"Six Lectures on Light" by John Tyndall
Into the bottom of this vessel introduce from twenty to thirty grams of iodine in crystals.
"Disputed Handwriting" by Jerome B. Lavay
The excess of iodine is determined, on addition of from 10 to 15 c.c.
"Scientific American Supplement, Vol. XIX, No. 470, Jan. 3, 1885" by Various
A small drop of tincture of iodine has the same effect.
"Burroughs' Encyclopaedia of Astounding Facts and Useful Information, 1889" by Barkham Burroughs
The man told Bob where to find a bottle of iodine.
"The Radio Boys on the Mexican Border" by Gerald Breckenridge
This organic iodine will regulate the secretions of the glands.
"Valere Aude" by Louis Dechmann
Iodide of lead evolves abundance of lead at the negative pole, and abundance of iodine at the positive pole.
"Experimental Researches in Electricity, Volume 1" by Michael Faraday
The layer of iodine used in the foregoing experiments intercepted the rays of the noonday sun.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
He said seaweed contains iodine which is very important for medicine.
"Geography and Plays" by Gertrude Stein
Its power depends on the fact that it is slowly decomposed by the tissues, and free iodine given off.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 2" by Various
Iodine has lately been announced as a remedy, but of the certainty of its effects, we are not aware.
"Domestic Animals" by Richard L. Allen
B is the eutectic point for iodine and iodine monochloride.
"The Phase Rule and Its Applications" by Alexander Findlay
Sally ran to a cabinet for gauze, iodine and cotton.
"Guilt of the Brass Thieves" by Mildred A. Wirt
Iodine for housemaid's knee or sore throat.
"The Witch Doctor and other Rhodesian Studies" by Frank Worthington
The same is true of tellurium and iodine.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 9, Slice 3" by Various
Iodine and gauze, old man.
"Billy Barcroft, R.N.A.S." by Percy F. Westerman
If I only had a little iodine, or any sort of antiseptic.
"Home Fires in France" by Dorothy Canfield
***

In poetry:

They gave him a bed by the entrance;
No room in the ward could be found.
Strong iodine vapour pervaded
The draught from the windows around.
"In Hospital" by Boris Pasternak
There's a dirty, low-down drunkard, who has wronged a painted doll
With a bullet in the tail-end of his spine
There's a woman with a broken heart, and dislocated neck
Who paints her housemaid's knees with iodine.
"The Dampoor Express" by Billy Bennett

In news:

A woman examines iodine pills, intended as protection from any potential radiation from Japan, at a pharmacy in New Taipei City yesterday.
Seeing run on iodine pills.
Revision of D6869 - 03 Standard Test Method for Coulometric and Volumetric Determination of Moisture in Plastics Using the Karl Fischer Reaction (the Reaction of Iodine with Water).
More than 60 percent of iodine (EYE-uh-dine) in the body is found in the thyroid (THIGH-royd) gland, located near the throat.
Get essential iodine through a bit of salt.
Iodine Deficiency May Cause Major Health Issues.
If you eschew fish and dairy, you could be coming up short in iodine, according to researchers at Boston University School of Medicine.
Excellent Source of Natural, Non-Radioactive Iodine.
Magic bullet ': Iodine capsule for thyroid cancer now available here.
Loaded with iodine, which is necessary for proper thyroid function, seaweed also contains folate, calcium, iron and vitamins A, C, E and K.
Iodine radioisotopes are produced by fission of uranium fuel in a nuclear reactor.
Determination Cloud Point Color, Lovibond Free Fatty Acids Iodine Value Slip Melting Point SFC.
Concerns about food safety spread Wednesday to Tokyo after officials said tap water showed elevated levels: 210 becquerels per liter of iodine-131 — more than twice the recommended limit of 100 becquerels per liter for infants.
Iodine, a non-metallic mineral, is required by humans in trace amounts for proper development and growth.
Officials say everything is OK -but here's some iodine anyway.
***

In science:

The instrumentation consists of a 1m telescope, equipped with two cameras for photometry of microlensing events with the lucky-imaging technique and a high-resolution spectrograph equipped with an iodine cell for obtaining high-precision radial velocities of solar-like stars, in order to do asteroseismology.
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
Radial velocities are measured using the iodine technique (Butler et al. 1996).
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
In addition to this, a temperature stabilized iodine cell is also available for providing an accurate velocity reference.
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
In order to determine the required high-precision velocities an iodine cell will be used for wavelength reference.
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
We note that at the present time the iSONG iodine reduction software has achieved a level of precision of ≈ 0.8m/s on UVES archival data for α Cen A; thus with the current generation of the software a 1m/s precision can realistically be expected.
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
It should be noted that the iodine cell is not located permanently in the light path; therefore “conventional” spectroscopy with ThAr calibration exposures prior to, and after, science exposure will be possible.
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
We have developed an IDL-based data reduction code, called iSONG, for the extraction of velocities based on iodine-cell observations.
The Stellar Observations Network Group - the Prototype
An iodine gas absorption cell is placed in the optical path to provide a precise wavelength calibration.
The spin-orbit angle of the transiting hot jupiter CoRoT-1b
Precise differential RVs were computed with our Austral iodine code (Endl et al. 2000).
The spin-orbit angle of the transiting hot jupiter CoRoT-1b
With a novel radial velocity technique employing an iodine absorption cell we achieve an unprecedented RV precision of up to 2 m s−1 for double-lined binary stars.
The Radial Velocity TATOOINE Search for Circumbinary Planets: Planet Detection Limits for a Sample of Double-lined Binary Stars - Initial Results from Keck I/Hires, Shane/CAT/Hamspec and TNG/Sarg Observations
In §2 we discuss the novel iodine cell based approach that allows us to measure precisely RVs of SB2s.
The Radial Velocity TATOOINE Search for Circumbinary Planets: Planet Detection Limits for a Sample of Double-lined Binary Stars - Initial Results from Keck I/Hires, Shane/CAT/Hamspec and TNG/Sarg Observations
In the iodine cell (I2 ) technique, the Doppler shift of a star spectrum ∆λ is determined by solving the following equation (Marcy & Butler 1992).
The Radial Velocity TATOOINE Search for Circumbinary Planets: Planet Detection Limits for a Sample of Double-lined Binary Stars - Initial Results from Keck I/Hires, Shane/CAT/Hamspec and TNG/Sarg Observations
Iobs (λ) = [Is (λ + ∆λs ) TI2 (λ + ∆λI2 )] ⊗ P SF where ∆λs is the shift of the star spectrum, ∆λI2 is the shift of the iodine transmission function TI2 , ⊗ represents a convolution and P SF a spectrograph’s point spread function.
The Radial Velocity TATOOINE Search for Circumbinary Planets: Planet Detection Limits for a Sample of Double-lined Binary Stars - Initial Results from Keck I/Hires, Shane/CAT/Hamspec and TNG/Sarg Observations
The parameters ∆λs , ∆λI2 as well as parameters describing the PSF are determined by performing a least-squares fit to the observed (through the iodine cell) spectrum Iobs .
The Radial Velocity TATOOINE Search for Circumbinary Planets: Planet Detection Limits for a Sample of Double-lined Binary Stars - Initial Results from Keck I/Hires, Shane/CAT/Hamspec and TNG/Sarg Observations
Such an iodine technique can only be applied to single stars.
The Radial Velocity TATOOINE Search for Circumbinary Planets: Planet Detection Limits for a Sample of Double-lined Binary Stars - Initial Results from Keck I/Hires, Shane/CAT/Hamspec and TNG/Sarg Observations
***