intone

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v intone recite with musical intonation; recite as a chant or a psalm "The rabbi chanted a prayer"
    • v intone speak carefully, as with rising and falling pitch or in a particular tone "please intonate with sadness"
    • v intone utter monotonously and repetitively and rhythmically "The students chanted the same slogan over and over again"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Intone To speak with a distinctive or unusual tone in the voice, or in a monotone; as, the professor intoned his lectures as though by rote.
    • v. i Intone To utter a prolonged tone or a deep, protracted sound; to speak or recite in a measured, sonorous manner; to intonate.
    • Intone To utter with a musical or prolonged note or tone; to chant; as, to intone the church service.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • intone To give tone or variety of tone to; vocalize.
    • intone To bring into tone or tune; figuratively, to imbue with a particular tone of feeling.
    • intone To speak or recite with the singing voice: as, to intone the litany.
    • intone To utter a tone; utter a protracted sound.
    • intone Specifically To use a monotone in pronouncing or repeating; speak or recite with the singing voice; chant.
    • intone In music:
    • intone To produce a tone, or a particular series of tones, like a scale, especially with the voice; sing or chant.
    • intone In plainsong, to sing the intonation of a chant or melody.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Intone in-tōn′ to utter in tones: to give forth a low protracted sound
    • v.t Intone to chant: to read (the church service) in a singing, recitative manner
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. intonare, intonatum,; pref. in-, in + L. tonus, tone. See Tone and cf. Entune Intonate

Usage

In literature:

Then turning to Drusus, he entirely changed his intonation.
"A Friend of Caesar" by William Stearns Davis
He returned to his gate, intoning it; the fresh voice rose higher as the phrasing became more familiar.
"Bunker Bean" by Harry Leon Wilson
The precentor, with his choristers, "Satan's clerks," as he used to call them when he was annoyed, begun to intone a psalm.
"Garman and Worse" by Alexander Lange Kielland
The words he could not hear, but he could distinguish the intonation.
"French and English" by Evelyn Everett-Green
Perhaps my intonation was a little dreamy.
"A Voyage of Consolation" by Sara Jeannette Duncan
The tones and intonations of her voice, the expression of her face showed no emotion.
"The Physiology of Marriage, Complete" by Honore de Balzac
The child mimics the actions, accents and intonations of the parent.
"The Art of Public Speaking" by Dale Carnagey (AKA Dale Carnegie) and J. Berg Esenwein
Just as he drew rein, the old herder imitated with perfect intonation the quavering bleat of a lamb calling to its mother.
"Sundown Slim" by Henry Hubert Knibbs
Originally the organ was used only to give the right intonation for the chanting of the priests.
"Critical & Historical Essays" by Edward MacDowell
To guide these explorers, there was only a dim instinct that the ancients had declaimed dramatic verse with musical intonation.
"Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2" by John Addington Symonds
His accent and certain intonations established that.
"Burned Bridges" by Bertrand W. Sinclair
Something in the intonations of his voice induced me to frankness.
"The Killer" by Stewart Edward White
The phonograph companies seldom give out a record which is not practically perfect in technic and intonation.
"The Joyful Heart" by Robert Haven Schauffler
He spoke lower than was his wont, colloquially, almost carelessly, with an amused intonation.
"Quisanté" by Anthony Hope
This method of breathing may then be put to the actual test in intonation.
"Voice Production in Singing and Speaking" by Wesley Mills
It was a strange, indescribable intonation, a flat, hollow voice.
"Wandl the Invader" by Raymond King Cummings
We are wanting a fresher intonation to those images, and expect a new approach, and a newer aspect.
"Adventures in the Arts" by Marsden Hartley
I could not, for the life of me, comprehend the drift of this question, but there was no mistaking the insolent intonation of it.
"The Log of a Privateersman" by Harry Collingwood
It was full of grief and reproach: I knew its every intonation.
"She and I, Volume 1" by John Conroy Hutcheson
The difference from just intonation is about one-fiftieth of a semi-tone.
"The Recent Revolution in Organ Building" by George Laing Miller
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In poetry:

I see a thousand throngs,
To-morrows for them wait;
I hear a thousand songs
Intoning each one's fate.
""To-Morrows"" by Abram Joseph Ryan
What of the dove,
Or thrush, or any singing mysteries?
What of the trees
And intonations of the trees?
"Sonatina To Hans Christian" by Wallace Stevens
Green, thro a torii, the way
Leads to it, worn, across
A rivulet whose voice intones
With mystery of moss.
"A Nikko Shrine" by Cale Young Rice
List we softly to the music
As its volumes gently roll,
Varied in their intonation
By the tension of the soul.
"Heartstrings" by Jared Barhite
Do you recognize these songs? You never sang them,
not quite with this intonation.
For you every morning brings its new light
warm through your open windows.
And you have the feeling from face to face
that tempts you to be indulgent.
"The Song Of The Blindman" by Rainer Maria Rilke
And when the dark night wraps the cemet'ry
And only the dead to vigil there are left alone,
Don't disturb their repose, don't disturb the mystery:
If you hear the sounds of cittern or psaltery,
It is I, dear Country, who, a song t'you intone.
"The Last Poem of Rizal" by Jose Rizal

In news:

"Beauty may be only skin deep, but ugly is to the bone," the queen of the thunderously intoned wisecrack, Tallulah Bankhead, is reputed to have said on the subject of appearances.
If it's gonna be," Dan Rather used to intone, striding through the CBS newsroom, "it's up to me.
"Thank you for calling Food Amongst the Flowers," a man's voice intones, in the precisely articulated upper-crust British accents of, say, actor James Mason.
Hot Rodding an Early '80s Squier Telecaster, Part 11: Adjusting the Intonation .
'Casaba,' He Intoned , and a Nightmare Was Born.
During a recent appearance on Meet the Press, House Speaker John Boehner offered up a pithy, two-word justification for draconian budget cuts: "We're broke," he intoned.
" "The board's rulings raise new questions about what the league knew, and when it knew it," intones...
For the first time since its now hazy origins eight years ago as the Intonation Music Festival, I had to miss the opening of festivities in Union Park on Friday because of a family obligation.
So intoned Morgan Spurlock, the host of I Bet You Will, the new dare-to-degrade-yourself Web show that launched this week with an arsenal of cash-fueled humiliation.
Hot Rodding an Early '80s Squier Telecaster, Part 11: Adjusting the Intonation.
"I don't believe in set phrases," Flavio Cianciarulo intones, his voice crackling over the phone from Mar del Plata, Argentina.
I confess that I smugly pictured the legion of those who smugly intone "crusades" whenever the talk gets around to violence and religion.
Just as one song on the radio fades away and another begins, a ghostly voice intones: "Iced coffee at McDonald's.".
The waiter intoned, bending over the table and sounding very much like a priest probing for a painful confession.
But Widowspeak strings together songs of wistful listlessness with lulling guitar riffs and the angelic intonations of vocalist Molly Hamilton.
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In science:

For intonational studies of adult intonation in speech directed to children, see the overview in (Fernald, 1991).
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
For general discussion of the intonational characteristics of longer discourses, see (Brazil et al., 1980; Brown et al., 1980; Brown and Yule, 1983).
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Intonation and Its Uses: Melody in Grammar and Discourse.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Stem polarity and tag intonation in the derivation of the imperative tag.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
The English Tone of Voice: Essays in Intonation, Prosody, and Paralanguage.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Assigning intonational features in synthesized spoken directions.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Some intonational characteristics of discourse structure.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Hart et al., 1990] Hart, J., Collier, R., and Cohen, A. (1990). A Perceptual Study of Intonation.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Intonational features of local and global discourse structure.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Now let’s talk about now: Identifying cue phrases intonationally.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Towards a discourse-based model of English sentence intonation.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
House, 1990b] House, J. (1990b). A revised model for intonation for synthesis by rule.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
Contextually appropriate intonation in speech synthesis.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
The meaning of intonational contours in the interpretation of discourse.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
The intonational disambiguation of indirect speech acts.
Some Bibliographical References on Intonation and Intonational Meaning
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