hyperbaton

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n hyperbaton reversal of normal word order (as in `cheese I love')
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Hyperbaton (Gram) A figurative construction, changing or inverting the natural order of words or clauses; as, “echoed the hills” for “the hills echoed.” "With a violent hyperbaton to transpose the text."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n hyperbaton In gram, and rhetoric: A figure consisting in departure from the customary order by placing a word or phrase in an unusual position in a sentence; transposition or inversion, especially of a bold or violent sort. Hyperbaton is principally used for emphasis : as, “Great is Diana of the Ephesians” (Acts xix. 28), for “Diana of the Ephesians is great.” It also frequently serves to facilitate clearness of connection between clauses. In ancient Greek and Latin literature it was in constant use to produce a rhythmical effect in sentences by arranging words on metrical rather than syntactical principles. It is mostfrequent-ly used in poetry, being one of the principal means of differentiating poetic diction from that of prose; but it is by no means rare in oratory in passages of an especially earnest or passionate character, and it is very common in excited or vehement conversation. Also called trajection. See synchysis.
    • n hyperbaton An instance or example of such transposition.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Hyperbaton hī-per′ba-ton (rhet.) a figure by which words are transposed from their natural order
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., fr. Gr. , fr. transposed, fr. to step over; "ype`r over + to step
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr.,—hyperbaineinhyper, beyond, bainein, to go.

Usage

In literature:

The figure hyperbaton belongs to the same class.
"On the Sublime" by Longinus
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