hybridise

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v hybridise breed animals or plants using parents of different races and varieties "cross a horse and a donkey","Mendel tried crossbreeding","these species do not interbreed"
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t., v.i Hybridise to cause to interbreed, and to interbreed.—-ns. Hybridis′er
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Usage

In literature:

Now let us turn to the results arrived at by the third most experienced hybridiser, namely, the Honourable and Reverend W. Herbert.
"On the Origin of Species" by Charles Darwin
The subject of hybridisation is dealt with in another part of this essay.
"Darwin and Modern Science" by A.C. Seward and Others
Now let us turn to the results arrived at by a third most experienced hybridiser, namely, the Hon.
"On the Origin of Species" by Charles Darwin
I cannot doubt that every unit of the hybrid is hybridised and sends forth hybridised gemmules.
"More Letters of Charles Darwin" by Charles Darwin
Wichura, M.E., "L'Hybridisation dans le regne vegetal etudiee sur les Saules," "Arch.
"More Letters of Charles Darwin Volume II" by Charles Darwin
Hybridisation is not considered by Mr. Darwin as a cause of new species, but rather as tending to keep variation within bounds.
"The Geological Evidence of The Antiquity of Man" by Charles Lyell
Now let us turn to the results arrived at by the third most experienced hybridiser, namely, the Hon.
"On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection" by Charles Darwin
Hybridisation and cross fertilisation are also well-known agents in diminishing the number and size of seeds.
"Vegetable Teratology" by Maxwell T. Masters
These hybridised seeds germinated, and produced young plants likewise intermediate in character.
"The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I." by Charles Darwin
The tie in question was an attempt to hybridise the respective colour-schemes of a tartan plaid and a Neapolitan ice.
"Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, November 11, 1914" by Various
Hybridisation experiments before Mendel there had been in plenty.
"Mendelism" by Reginald Crundall Punnett
Pure gemmules in combination with hybridised gemmules would lead to partial reversion.
"The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Volume II (of 2)" by Charles Darwin
There may be other crosses probably, since no official record of Hybridisation exists as yet.
"The Woodlands Orchids" by Frederick Boyle
Heterostyled plants, 311; some forms of fertilisation of, analogous to hybridisation, 312.
"Charles Darwin: His Life in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters" by Charles Darwin
Peas rarely become hybridised naturally.
"Disease in Plants" by H. Marshall Ward
In this fashion, he has bred hundreds from the egg upwards and even hybridised the two different species!
"The Journal of a Disappointed Man" by Wilhelm Nero Pilate Barbellion
In nothing, perhaps, has there been such a wonderful improvement by culture and hybridising as the Petunia.
"Talks about Flowers." by M. D. Wellcome
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In science:

The weak hybridisation between the two subchains of the double chain leads to two slightly split bands.
On the electronic structure of CaCuO2 and SrCuO2
Their simplest hybridisation consists of the following.
Geometry of irreversibility: The film of nonequilibrium states
This gives two bands closest to EF (predominantly Ti-dxy and Se-pz ) as well as the FS in very good accord with earlier results , as shown in Fig. 1. A sizable dxy − pz mixing hybridises the small number of electrons and holes.
Preformed Excitons, Orbital Selectivity, and Charge-Density-Wave Order in 1T-TiSe_2
We believe that this important modification, hitherto not noted sufficiently, arises due to an orbital-dependent electronic structure reconstruction that is essentially driven by the k-dependent form factor of the inter-orbital hybridisation (tab (k)).
Preformed Excitons, Orbital Selectivity, and Charge-Density-Wave Order in 1T-TiSe_2
One of the objectives of the DGEMap project is to optimise the physical use of tissue through new wet-lab techniques and more reliable instruments such as automatic systems for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation.
An e-Infrastructure for Collaborative Research in Human Embryo Development
Refinements of the model to include the effects of probe and target folding and bulk hybridisation in the supernatant solution [5, 16] maintain the hyperbolic shape of the response function while decreasing the effective adsorption rate constant.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
The above physico-chemical models generally assume that the concentration of target molecules in the supernatant solution is not appreciably depleted by the hybridisation reaction.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
By local depletion we mean that depletion of target molecules in the supernatant solution by a hybridisation to a given probe feature only affects that particular probe feature.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
This is essentially Ono et al.’s “finite hybridisation model”.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
This regime is relevant when diffusion and/or convection of targets is slow compared with the hybridisation and probe features responsive to the same target species are spatially separated on the microarray.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
Full details of our local and global depletion models, including specific and nonspecific hybridisation of target molecules to probes at the microarray surface and of targets within the supernatant solution and the folding of target and probe molecules, are set out in Appendix A.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
The remaining question, which we settle below in favour of local depletion, is whether diffusion or convection of target molecules is slow (local depletion) or fast (global depletion) relative to the rate of hybridisation.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
This follows from the definition Eq. (A.27) and the relationship KPS ∝ e∆G/(RT ) relating the hybridisation constant to free binding energy ∆G, which is well approximated by the SantaLucia nearest neighbour stacking model .
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
In a previous analysis the U95a data set was shown to fit very well, and the U133 data set moderately well, to a physico-chemical model in which the target concentration was assumed not to be significantly depleted from the supernatant solution by hybridisation to the microarray surface.
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
PM and MM hybridisation fractions due to specific binding only, and is obtained by solving Eq. (9).
Physico-chemical modelling of target depletion during hybridisation on oligonulceotide microarrays
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