hotfoot

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adv hotfoot without delay; speedily "sent ambassadors hotfoot to the Turks"- Francis Hackett","drove hotfoot for Boston"
    • v hotfoot move fast "He rushed down the hall to receive his guests","The cars raced down the street"
    • n hotfoot a practical joke that involves inserting a match surreptitiously between the sole and upper of the victim's shoe and then lighting it
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • adv Hotfoot In haste; foothot.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • hotfoot In great haste; with great speed.
    • hotfoot To chase or pursue in hot haste; follow at a hot pace.
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Usage

In literature:

And while we hotfooted it across the sand it seemed all the rifles on Indian hill were turned loose on us.
"The Jacket (The Star-Rover)" by Jack London
June was at home; she had come down hotfoot on hearing the news of Jolly's enlistment.
"The Forsyte Saga, Volume II." by John Galsworthy
When he was hotfooting it to escape from you, he turned round an' started to bring her back to the ranch.
"Oh, You Tex!" by William Macleod Raine
Just you stir your stumps and hotfoot a slug of square-faced gin into me if you know what's for your own best good.
"The Best Short Stories of 1919" by Various
Maybe I didn't hotfoot it back though.
"Marjorie Dean High School Freshman" by Pauline Lester
If the effect had been produced in the soles of policemen's feet, Hoddan would have given every cop a hotfoot.
"The Pirates of Ersatz" by Murray Leinster
No wonder old Michael is off hotfoot to the White City!
"A Son of the Immortals" by Louis Tracy
What he saw on the other side sent him back to his chums hotfoot.
"The Ranger Boys and the Border Smugglers" by Claude A. Labelle
Rolfe and his men had gone immediately to the aid of the tortured captives, and the two guides were despatched hotfoot after water.
"Gold Out of Celebes" by Aylward Edward Dingle
Before either of us could break the bad news to him he was hotfooting it around the wheel toward 22A.
"The Love of Frank Nineteen" by David Carpenter Knight
If they did for Watson, they undoubtedly pulled out hotfoot.
"They of the High Trails" by Hamlin Garland
Well, pardner, I'm the King of Hotfoot Valley, and I've got travelin' papers for you right here!
"The Duke Of Chimney Butte" by G. W. Ogden
Lupin is off, hotfoot, to the Stables, to catch Mr. Sandys, and bring him round.
"When Ghost Meets Ghost" by William Frend De Morgan
Last week he gives me a hotfoot.
"Jimsy and the Monsters" by Walt Sheldon
But he didn't find coal, but something that made him hotfoot it to his books.
"The Orphan" by Clarence E. Mulford
Either way, the pursuivant will see the trick, and speed hotfoot back to this house.
"A Gentleman Player" by Robert Neilson Stephens
Misfortunes had pressed upon him hotfoot.
"London Days" by Arthur Warren
Bart Crawley, furious and revengeful, had started hotfoot for the county seat Saturday to issue a warrant.
"A Maid of the Kentucky Hills" by Edwin Carlile Litsey
When I found this gold I wrote her hotfoot.
"Ruth Fielding In the Saddle" by Alice B. Emerson
Then they turned and fled through the streets of Adrianople with a dozen Turks hotfoot after them.
"The Great Airship." by F. S. Brereton
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In news:

The Jamaican sprint great hotfooted it from Olympic Stadium on Saturday night to a party nearby in East London and turned DJ to entertain the packed crowd.
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