honeysuckle

Definitions

  • Showing palmette and honeysuckle design
    Showing palmette and honeysuckle design
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n honeysuckle columbine of eastern North America having long-spurred red flowers
    • n honeysuckle shrubby tree with silky foliage and spikes of cylindrical yellow nectarous flowers
    • n honeysuckle shrub or vine of the genus Lonicera
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Honeysuckle (Bot) One of several species of flowering plants, much admired for their beauty, and some for their fragrance.☞ The honeysuckles are properly species of the genus Lonicera; as, Lonicera Caprifolium, and Lonicera Japonica, the commonly cultivated fragrant kinds; Lonicera Periclymenum, the fragrant woodbine of England; Lonicera grata, the American woodbine, and Lonicera sempervirens, the red-flowered trumpet honeysuckle. The European fly honeysuckle is Lonicera Xylosteum; the American, Lonicera ciliata. The American Pinxter flower (Azalea nudiflora) is often called honeysuckle, or false honeysuckle. The name Australian honeysuckle is applied to one or more trees of the genus Banksia. See French honeysuckle, under French.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n honeysuckle A name of upright or climbing shrubs of the genus Lonicera, natural order Caprifoliaceœ, natives of the temperate parts of both hemispheres. They have entire opposite leaves, and axillary, often fragrant, white, red, or yellow flowers, which are succeeded by sweetish red or purple berries. The common honeysuckle, L. Periclymenum, a native of central and western Europe, cultivated in the United States, is also known by the name of woodbine, and is probably the ‘twisted eglantine’ of Milton. L. Caprifolium, which is frequent in gardens, and is characterized by the upper pairs of leaves being united into a cup, and L. Xylosteum, the fly - honeysuckle, are also found in England, the latter only being probably native. L. sempervirens (trumpet or coral honeysuckle), a native of North America, is cultivated on account of the beauty of its large flowers, which are red on the outside and yellowish within. L. ciliata is the American fly-honeysuckle; it has a honey-yellow corolla slightly tinged with purple. L. flexuosa is the Chinese honeysuckle, and L. Tatarica the Tatarian honeysuckle. The bark of L. corymbosa is used for dyeing black in Chili, and the berries of L. cœrulea are a favorite food of the Kamtchadales.
    • n honeysuckle A plant of some other genus. The name honeysuckle is very generally applied in northern New England to the genus Aquilegia, of the natural order Ranunculaceæ, and particularly to the native wild columbine, A. Canadensis. The African fly-honeysuckle is Halleria lucida, of the natural order Scrophularineæ; the Australian honeysuckles belong to the genus Banksia, natural order Proteaceæ, as B. serrata and B. integrifolia. The bush-honeysuckles, of the genus Diervilla (a near relative of Lonicera, the true honeysuckle), are low shrubs of North America, China, and Japan, extensively cultivated for their profuse, mostly rose-colored flowers. The dwarf honeysuckle is Cornus Suecica, of the natural order Cornaceæ, a native of north temperate or arctic countries; the French honeysuckle is Hedysarum coronarium, of the natural order Leguminosæ; the ground-honeysuckle is Lotus corniculatus, of the natural order Leguminosæ; the New Zealand honeysuckle is Knightia excelsa, of the natural order Proteaceæ; the Tasmanian honeysuckle is Banksia australis; the West Indian honeysuckle is Tecoma capensis; the purple honeysuckle or azalea is Rhododendron nudiflorum; the white honeysuckle is Rhododendron viscosum, of the natural order Ericaceæ. Various species of Desmodium are also so called. See Banksia, Diervilla, Lonicera, Cornus, Hedysarum, Desmodium, Halleria, Tecoma, Rhododendron.
    • n honeysuckle The flower of any of the above plants.
    • n honeysuckle The color of the flowers of the common honeysuckle; “a combination of pale pink and even paler yellow.”
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Honeysuckle a climbing shrub with beautiful cream-coloured flowers, so named because honey is readily sucked from the flower
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. AS. hunisūge, privet. See Honey, and Suck
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. hunig; Ger. honig, Ice. hunang.

Usage

In literature:

When I went home to dinner, I found Gregorios Balsamides seated on the wooden bench under the honeysuckle outside my door.
"Paul Patoff" by F. Marion Crawford
He seated them by the railing, along which trailed a honeysuckle vine.
"Sacrifice" by Stephen French Whitman
Dat Sunday night I did walk wid Jim ter de gate an' stood under de honeysuckles dat wus a-smellin' so sweet.
"Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States" by Various
See that lovely humming-bird around the honeysuckle, searching in vain for honey.
"The Youth of Jefferson" by Anonymous
Some partially virescent honeysuckle flowers have a similar structure.
"Vegetable Teratology" by Maxwell T. Masters
Their white gowns shimmered against the dark honeysuckle-vine.
"The Courting Of Lady Jane" by Josephine Daskam
The tulip, the fern, the honeysuckle, and the lily are examples.
"Wealth of the World's Waste Places and Oceania" by Jewett Castello Gilson
Mr. Sam paused as if for breath, and plucking down a wisp of honeysuckle from the hedgerow, sniffed at it to gain time.
"Shining Ferry" by Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
We changed the conversation to a pergola planned for building next spring, that was to be overrun by grapevines and honeysuckle.
"The Thing from the Lake" by Eleanor M. Ingram
Vines ran riotously over supports, and roses and honeysuckle made the air sweet.
"A Little Girl in Old Boston" by Amanda Millie Douglas
Only the honeysuckle vine retained its greenness.
"The Heart of Arethusa" by Francis Barton Fox
Ardenbough and Honeysuckle Arbour are common.
"Lalage's Lovers" by George A. Birmingham
The honeysuckle fragrance filled the air.
"The Northern Iron" by George A. Birmingham
The buds are made solid, and formed similarly to the honeysuckle; they are shaded green and scarlet, like the flower.
"The Royal Guide to Wax Flower Modelling" by Emma Peachey
Every hedgerow is hoary with May-bloom and honeysuckle.
"New Italian sketches" by John Addington Symonds
He also was out, but he made only one call, and that was to the Honeysuckle, for they were betrothed.
"Seven Little People and their Friends" by Horace Elisha Scudder
The place is very attractive-looking, grapevines and honeysuckles and pine woods near.
"Letters from Port Royal" by Various
Also there had been tense moments in the honeysuckle arbour.
"The Mistress of Shenstone" by Florence L. Barclay
The air was scented with honeysuckle, and from an obscure corner behind a trellis the sound of a waltz floated.
"Virginia" by Ellen Glasgow
The dear old honeysuckle that she is!
"Hester's Counterpart" by Jean K. Baird
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In poetry:

Do I love thee? Ask the bee
If she loves the flowery lea,
Where the honeysuckle blows
And the fragrant clover grows.
As she answers, Yes or No,
Darling! take my answer so.
""Do I Love Thee?"" by John Godfrey Saxe
The blue lake of Devenish!
I put my thousand blessings there;
(The blue lake of Devenish )
On shadow waters all a-stir,
And on the wind-blown honeysuckle
Beauty of Feithfailge's hair.
"Feithfailge" by Anna Johnston MacManus
How fast the year is going by!
Love, it will be September soon;
O let us make the best of June.
Already, love, it is July;
The rose and honeysuckle go,
And all too soon will come the snow.
""How Fast The Year Is Going" by Richard Le Gallienne
Love is in the greenwood building him a house
Of wild rose and hawthorn and honeysuckle boughs:
Love is in the greenwood, dawn is in the skies,
And Marian is waiting with a glory in her eyes.
"A Song of Sherwood" by Alfred Noyes
When the bees are humming in the honeysuckle vine
And the summer days are in their bloom,
Then my love is deepest, oh, dearest heart of mine,
When the bees are humming in the honeysuckle vine.
"Love's Seasons" by Paul Laurence Dunbar
Where is the daughter of old Hawk and Buckle,
And what of Mistress Jenny this hot summer weather?
She sits in the parlour with smell of honeysuckle,
Trimming her bonnet with red ostrich feather.
"Hawk And Buckle" by Robert Graves

In news:

The swamp on this azalea morning was strong with a turpentine smell, honeysuckle, and azaleas .
The Cape honeysuckle is known as a winter bloomer .
Honeysuckle Countertop Spray, $4 for 16 ounces, MrsMeyers.com.
(AP) — Biologists from Northern Kentucky University have begun studying whether restoration efforts will give forests and banks the ability to keep honeysuckle from returning once the invasive plant has been rooted out.
Mexican honeysuckle ( justicia spicigera ).
Although Mexican honeysuckle shares a common name with our common honeysuckle , Lonicera japonica, and looks somewhat similar, the two plants are not related.
Honeysuckle Is No Friend to Habitat.
My "Aunt Grandma" (she's always been both to me, so that's what I call her) has these Mountain Honeysuckle 's in her Yard.
The plants are also know as Wild Honeysuckle or Yellow Azalia.
Winter is a good time to control honeysuckle.
The web was on the honeysuckle climbing on my deck.
This follows the equally vibrant warm hue of 2011, Honeysuckle.
Ian Deutch Memorial Park, corner of Pahrump Valley Blvd and Honeysuckle.
Officials in Salisbury are reporting extensive power outages in parts of the township, including West Rock Road, Honeysuckle Road and mountain areas.
Do men really seek out women who smell like lilacs, jasmine and honeysuckle.
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