hereditament

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n hereditament any property (real or personal or mixed) that can be inherited
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Hereditament (Law) Any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements, anything corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal, or mixed, that may descend to an heir.☞ A corporeal hereditament is visible and tangible; an incorporeal hereditament is not in itself visible or tangible, being an hereditary right, interest, or obligation, as duty to pay rent, or a right of way.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n hereditament In law, any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements, or anything corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal, or mixed, that may descend to an heir in the strict sense (see heir, 1); inheritable property, as distinguished from property which necessarily terminates with the life of the owner, and, according to some writers, as distinguished in modern times from personal assets which go to the executor or administrator instead of the heir. A corporeal hereditament is visible and tangible; an incorporeal hereditament is a right existing in contemplation of law, issuing out of corporeal property, but not itself the object of bodily senses as an easement a franchise, or a rent.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Hereditament all property of whatever kind that may pass to an heir
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. hereditamentum,. See Hereditable
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. hereditas, the state of an heir—heres, herēdis, an heir.

Usage

In literature:

He is in of the same fee, or hereditas, which means, as I have shown, that he sustains the same persona.
"The Common Law" by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
Nobody denied that all the lands and hereditaments of the Crown had passed with the Crown to the new Sovereigns.
"The History of England from the Accession of James II." by Thomas Babington Macaulay
In legal language, it was an incorporeal hereditament.
"The Theory of Social Revolutions" by Brooks Adams
He concluded that it must be an ancestral hereditament from Athens, Ohio.
"By Advice of Counsel" by Arthur Train
Define corporeal and incorporeal hereditaments.
"The Government Class Book" by Andrew W. Young
An aid of three shillings in the pound for one year was laid upon all lands, tenements, and hereditaments, according to their true value.
"The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. From William and Mary to George II." by Tobias Smollett
Five years away at the diggings, and left a house worth twenty pounds per year per annum, not to spake of other hereditaments.
"The Manxman A Novel - 1895" by Hall Caine
But you don't have any idea what incorporeal hereditaments are.
"Modus Vivendi" by Gordon Randall Garrett
Together with all the tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances thereto belonging.
"Putnam's Handy Law Book for the Layman" by Albert Sidney Bolles
I got an entail I'll show you in camp, and a pair of hereditaments.
"A Man in the Open" by Roger Pocock
Real property consists of lands, tenements and hereditaments.
"Toppleton's Client" by John Kendrick Bangs
The luctuosa hereditas, the mournful succession of ascendants to descendants, to the twentieth penny only.
"An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations" by Adam Smith
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