herbage

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n herbage succulent herbaceous vegetation of pasture land
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Herbage Herbs collectively; green food beasts; grass; pasture. "Thin herbage in the plaims."
    • Herbage (Law) The liberty or right of pasture in the forest or in the grounds of another man.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n herbage Herbaceous growth in general; vegetation; hence, pasturage; pasture-plants, as grass and clover.
    • n herbage In English law, the liberty or right of pasture in the forest or grounds of another man.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Herbage (hėrb′āj, or ėrb′āj) green food for cattle: pasture: herbs collectively
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. See Herb
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. herbe—L. herba, akin to Gr. phorbē, pasture—pherbein, to feed.

Usage

In literature:

They do well alike in mountain pastures and amid the herbage of the moistest plainland.
"Domesticated Animals" by Nathaniel Southgate Shaler
Often is my childhood troubled, 210 And my thoughts like withered herbage.
"Kalevala, Volume I (of 2)" by Anonymous
They were going slowly up the grassy hill, the short scanty herbage looking gray in the dimness.
"Vixen, Volume I." by M. E. Braddon
These animals live among grass and herbage which they brush against as they walk, and thus "blaze" a plain trail for the mate or young to follow.
"The Log of the Sun" by William Beebe
The luxuriant herbage is trampled down, crushed by the feet of elephants.
"What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales" by Hans Christian Andersen
Leaving the level ground he forced a way through the thick herbage growing on the bank above and crept forward.
"The Rider of Waroona" by Firth Scott
The land is generally low, and covered with an astonishing luxuriance of wood and herbage.
"Narrative of a Voyage to India; of a Shipwreck on board the Lady Castlereagh; and a Description of New South Wales" by W. B. Cramp
Its heat in the herbage was moist.
"Waiting for Daylight" by Henry Major Tomlinson
The herbage constituting pasture is, as every farmer knows, of a varied description.
"Manures and the principles of manuring" by Charles Morton Aikman
It was quite clear of snow; and covered with green herbage.
"Bruin" by Mayne Reid
Numberless summer insects mingled their discordant strains amidst the weedy herbage.
"Alonzo and Melissa" by Daniel Jackson, Jr.
He dropped from his saddle and in a second was feeling for his matches, while the horse fell to sniffing half-heartedly at the meagre herbage.
"A Modern Mercenary" by Kate Prichard and Hesketh Vernon Hesketh-Prichard
One's first impressions are of the green of the foliage and herbage.
"Quaker Hill" by Warren H. Wilson
They bounded through the tall herbage "like grasshoppers" and were remarkably agile in climbing.
"Man And His Ancestor" by Charles Morris
They were grazing on the dry, sparse herbage of the desert.
"Letters on an Elk Hunt" by Elinore Pruitt Stewart
Before her is a meadow of rich herbage, covered with daisies.
"Modern Painters Volume II (of V)" by John Ruskin
She had been rudely torn from her enjoyment of the herbage, and she resented that plainly.
"Betty Gordon in the Land of Oil" by Alice B. Emerson
By the help of these, he began searching among the herbage which grew thickly on either side of the path.
"Hair-Breadth Escapes" by H.C. Adams
It is found near hedges and thickets, from the fruits and herbage of which it obtains its food.
"Illustrative Anecdotes of the Animal Kingdom" by Samuel Griswold Goodrich
The boar, however, went on its way, routing among the herbage.
"Sinister Street, vol. 1" by Compton Mackenzie
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In poetry:

To pastures green and flow'ry meads,
His happy flock he gently leads,
Where water in abundance flows,
And where luxuriant herbage grows.
"Twenty-Third Psalm" by Rees Prichard
In silvery haze the purple hills are swathed,
In dripping dews the faded herbage bathed—
Red Robin trills his winter-warning ditty;
His big bright eye invoking crumbs and pity.
"October, 1861." by Janet Hamilton
David. As Hermon's dews their grateful freshness shed,
And cheer the herbage and the flowers anew,
So do thy words a quickening balm infuse,
And grateful sink in my delighted soul.
"David And Goliath. A Sacred Drama" by Hannah More
Though in a bare and rugged way,
Through devious lonely wilds, I stray,
Thy bounty shall my pains beguile;
The barren wilderness shall smile,
With sudden greens and herbage crowned,
And streams shall murmur all around.
"Psalm 23 : The Lord My Pasture Shall Prepare" by Joseph Addison
Shadowy, and close, and cool,
The pine and poplar keep their quiet nook;
For ever fresh and full,
Shines, at their feet, the thirst-inviting brook;
And the soft herbage seems
Spread for a place of banquets and of dreams.
"From The Spanish Of Villegas" by William Cullen Bryant
It was three months and over since the dear lad had started:
On the green downs at Cromer I sat to see the view;
On an open space of herbage, where the ling and fern had parted,
Betwixt the tall white lighthouse towers, the old and the new.
"Requiescat In Pace" by Jean Ingelow