hendiadys

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n hendiadys use of two conjoined nouns instead of a noun and modifier
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Hendiadys (Gram) A figure in which the idea is expressed by two nouns connected by and, instead of by a noun and limiting adjective; as, we drink from cups and gold, for golden cups .
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n hendiadys In rhet, a figure which consists in using two words connected by a copulative conjunction to express a single complex idea; especially, substitution of two substantives so coördinated for a substantive with its attributive adjective or limiting genitive. Thus Virgil (Georgics ii. 192) says ‘pateris libamus et auro,’ we pour out (wine) in libation from pateræ and gold—that is, ‘from golden pateræ’; Cicero (II. Verr. V. xiv. 36) speaks of ‘jus imaginis ad memoriam posteritatemque prodendæ,’ the right of transmitting one's portrait to memory and posterity, for ‘to the memory of posterity.’ Verbs can be used in the same way: as, ‘fundi fugarique,’ to be overthrown and put to flight —that is, to be utterly routed.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Hendiadys hen-dī′a-dis a rhetorical figure in which one and the same notion is presented in two expressions, as 'with might and main'=by main strength.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr. one by two
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. hen dia dyoin, lit. 'one by two.'

Usage

In literature:

Real instances of hendiadys are much rarer than is generally supposed.
"Cato Maior de Senectute" by Marcus Tullius Cicero
Hendiadys, 374, 4. heri, locative, 232, 2.
"New Latin Grammar" by Charles E. Bennett
***

In news:

The hendiadys "good and loud" appears in many reviews of the concert.
***