harrier

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n harrier hawks that hunt over meadows and marshes and prey on small terrestrial animals
    • n harrier a hound that resembles a foxhound but is smaller; used to hunt rabbits
    • n harrier a persistent attacker "the harassers were not members of the regular army"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Harrier (Zoöl) One of a small breed of hounds, used for hunting hares.
    • Harrier (Zoöl) One of several species of hawks or buzzards of the genus Circus which fly low and harry small animals or birds, -- as the European marsh harrier (Circus æruginosus), and the hen harrier (Circus cyaneus).
    • Harrier One who harries.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n harrier A small kind of hound employed in hunting the hare. There are particular breeds of the barrier, as the large slow-hunting harrier and the little fox-beagle, and a cross-breed between these. In all the scent is extremely keen, which enables them to follow all the doublings of the hare. Also spelled harier.
    • n harrier One who harries. See harry, v.
    • n harrier A bird of prey of the family Falconidæ, subfamily Circinœ, and genus Circus. There are about 12 species, of most parts of the world, of light build, small-bodied in proportion to the length of wing and tail, with a rather long and slender scaly shank, untoothed bill, large external ear-parts, and a ruff or disk somewhat like an owl's. The best-known species is the European hen-harrier or ringtail, Circus cyaneus, from which the common marsh-hawk of America, C. hudsonius, scarcely differs. (See cut under Circinæ.) The European marsh-harrier is C. æruginosus. (See harpy, 3 .) Montagu's harrier is another species, C. cinerascens. The males of the harriers differ much from the females, being bluish above instead of dark-brown, and are often called blue-hawks.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Harrier har′i-ėr a small kind of dog with a keen smell, for hunting hares:
    • n Harrier one who, or that which, harries: a kind of hawk so named from its harrying or destroying small animals
    • n Harrier har′i-ėr (pl.) a name taken by some clubs of cross-country runners (see Hare-and-hounds).
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From Hare (n.)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Formed from hare, like graz-i-er.

Usage

In literature:

To such, harriers afford no amusement.
"A New Illustrated Edition of J. S. Rarey's Art of Taming Horses" by J. S. Rarey
You war with the Carrick harriers last Monday, I'll go bail.
"The Macdermots of Ballycloran" by Anthony Trollope
Luckily for Puss, the harriers never visited her neighbourhood, and only on special occasions was coursing permitted on the estate.
"Creatures of the Night" by Alfred W. Rees
All the rest of the party again landed, and at twelve o'clock Tom and I went on board the 'Harrier.
"The Last Voyage" by Lady (Annie Allnutt) Brassey
Hampstead won't shoot, but he can hunt with the Braeside harriers.
"Marion Fay" by Anthony Trollope
Musical is a pack of harriers as a peal of bells.
"Recreations of Christopher North, Volume I (of 2)" by John Wilson
Without a pull at their reins, and without so much as a shadow of hesitation, they charged the harrier.
"A Gallant Grenadier" by F.S. Brereton
The harriers were soon at the spot, but no hare was to be found.
"Illustrative Anecdotes of the Animal Kingdom" by Samuel Griswold Goodrich
One of the Harriers, E.W.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 8" by Various
The two Harriers are typically Ground Hawks.
"An Australian Bird Book" by John Albert Leach
Harriers, North Norfolk, 277.
"Norfolk Annals A Chronological Record of Remarkable Events in the Nineteeth Century, Vol. 2" by Charles Mackie
He kept a pack of harriers, and had hunting rights over a considerable tract of country.
"Stranger Than Fiction" by Mary L. Lewes
Yet she would have been about as safe a person to have at large as a wild-cat among harriers.
"In the Days of the Guild" by Louise Lamprey
Because it is so pleasant to follow the Harriers on a hired hack in company with other hired hacks.
"Mr. Punch at the Seaside" by Various
The pack of harriers let loose by James and Bancroft were in full cry.
"The Beginners of a Nation" by Edward Eggleston
Another very large harrier from Teaute, which has never yet been properly described.
"Trees. A Woodland Notebook" by Herbert Maxwell
Another very large harrier from Teaute, which has never yet been properly described.
"Extinct Birds" by Walter Rothschild
I was never fond of harriers, and this was not, perhaps, the place or time to acquire the taste.
"My Experiences in a Lunatic Asylum" by Herman Charles Merivale
As we have already said, there should be no fuss and bustle in the field with harriers.
"The Sportswoman's Library, Vol. 1 of 2" by Various
Later the harrier was developed as a separate breed for hunting hares.
"The Dogs of Boytown" by Walter A. Dyer
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In poetry:

Prudence was absent, Love close press'd;
He clasp'd her round the slender waist,
And, like two harriers, in a tether,
Mov'd gently to'ards the wall together;
When she a dreadful yell begun,
"O help, o help, or I'm undone."
"The Milkman" by William Hutton

In news:

JDHS, TMHS harriers run at Skagway .
Local high school harriers tear up Ketchikan course.
Falcons' harriers to run down -under.
A Harrier conducts tests over California last year.
Spartan harriers 31st , 33rd at nationals.
Spartan harriers 31st, 33rd at nationals.
A northern harrier hunts in the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area.
SHS harriers place first in Brighton invitational.
Cub harriers set to contend for HOIC titles.
Red Devil harriers lead Metro Conference cross country contingent at Jaguar Invitational.
Barrington girls place third in Northeast regional harrier event.
A Harrier Jet Pilot True to the Creed , 'Every Marine a Rifleman'.
Barrington High defends girls' harrier title.
Download, fold and fly your own Harrier here.
Would you like to be a Marine aviator and fly your own Harrier AV8 jump jet.
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