gum tree

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n gum tree any of various trees of the genera Eucalyptus or Liquidambar or Nyssa that are sources of gum
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Chewing gum was created by the Mayans over 300 years ago. They boiled the sap of the sapodilla tree and chewed it.
    • n gum tree Any tree that exudes a gum,
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Idioms

Up a gum tree - (AU) If you're up a gum tree, you're in trouble or a big mess.
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Usage

In literature:

There was one kind of tree which shed an abundance of gum, as pleasant to burn as the best French pastilles.
"The Adventures of the Chevalier De La Salle and His Companions, in Their Explorations of the Prairies, Forests, Lakes, and Rivers, of the New World, and Their Interviews with the Savage Tribes, Two Hundred Years Ago" by John S. C. Abbott
Wherever his hunters came upon a red gum tree they cut it down.
"Bones" by Edgar Wallace
Not far off also were some gum-trees, from which he gathered a handful or two of gum.
"In the Wilds of Florida" by W.H.G. Kingston
The bee-gums of that day were made of sections of hollow trees.
"Stories Of Georgia" by Joel Chandler Harris
The bark of the tree is cut near the foot, and the sap that oozes from the scar quickly hardens into a gum.
"Commercial Geography" by Jacques W. Redway
There was one kind of tree which shed an abundance of gum, as pleasant to burn as the best French pastilles.
"Historical Tales, Vol. 2 (of 15)" by Charles Morris
They then saw him narrowly examining a tall gum-tree, up to which he had ridden.
"The Young Berringtons" by W.H.G. Kingston
Well, there's more gum where the limbs were cut on the nearest trees than on them farther away.
"Desert Conquest" by A. M. Chisholm
Then the fisherman gets under the shadow of a gum-tree and enjoys a quiet life, reading or just lazing.
"Peeps At Many Lands: Australia" by Frank Fox
And the one boy would climb trees and get spruce gum for her, while she would seek scouring rush for him.
"Lisbeth Longfrock" by Hans Aanrud
It is the gum of the rubber tree that becomes the rubber.
"Fil and Filippa" by John Stuart Thomson
Like a brace of opossums, they were up a gum-tree in no time, although the lady was in an advanced state of pregnancy.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, Number 385. November, 1847." by Various
The almost neutral eucalyptian tint was splashed with the gay hues of many parrots, as though the gum-trees had burst into flower.
"Stingaree" by E. W. (Ernest William) Hornung
I went with one of the troopers down the river, where the soil at the roots of a large gum tree had been hollowed out by the water.
"Reminiscences of Queensland" by William Henry Corfield
The blaze upon a sweet-gum-tree, which I remembered well, showed me the direction.
"The Quadroon" by Mayne Reid
To make the Sudden Remedy, grandma got roots, herbs, barks, twigs, leaves, mints, moss, and tree gum.
"Harper's Young People, February 10, 1880" by Various
These two products come from the sap or "gum" of the pine tree.
"Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts" by Girl Scouts
Now isn't that better than "gum" tree?
"Getting Acquainted with the Trees" by J. Horace McFarland
The Finke is a wide river of soft white sand, bordered on each side by gnarled and ancient gum trees.
"In the Musgrave Ranges" by Jim Bushman
The mother-bird lays her eggs in a hole in a gum-tree.
"Our Young Folks at Home and Abroad" by Various
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In poetry:

I thought the earth itself
Under the green gum-tree,
All in the sweet of summer
Reached out to strike at me.
"The Brown Snake" by Douglas Alexander Stewart
The dew-drenched nights of Summer,
When gum-trees are aflower,
In foamy waves of sweetness
Bring round the fairies’ hour.
"Fairies" by Alice Guerin Crist
The torn leaves swirled about my head;
The gum-trees tall and stout
Waved limbs and tossed tormented crests
As in a forest rout.
"Arnold Rode Behind" by Roderic Quinn
Then hearken how the poplar trees unfold
Their buds, yet close and gummed and blind,
In airy leafage of the mind,
Rustling in silvery whispers the twin-hued scales
That fade not nor grow old.
"Song of Poplars" by Aldous Huxley
“The Forest will show me the secrets of Fame,”
I said to myself in the gum-shadowed glen,
“I will call every blossom and tree by its name,
And the people shall deem me a man of the men.
"Sunset" by Henry Kendall
The far-travelled sheep lie at rest in the bend,
And the camp fire gleams red to the sky,
The shadows creep round us, and day's at an end
And the gum trees lean down to us, friend unto friend,
As the night-winds go murmuring by.
"A Leaf From Macquarie" by William Henry Ogilvie

In news:

Tree replaces bedpost to stick gum.
Especially the "gum tree" on the campus of Southeast Missouri State University.
The tree, Monday's photo puzzler on the "Faces & Places" page, is not even a distant cousin of the gum tree family.
Chewing gum was originally exactly that, congealed tree gum or resin, plus a flavoring agent, also usually natural.
Chewing gum was originally exactly that, congealed tree gum or resin, plus a flavoring agent, also usually natural.
Simply put – they are gum resins made from tree sap.
The sweet gum tree creates fireworks in the garden, with star-shape leaves that change to fiery hues in fall.
The roots of a sweet gum tree push through the curb along Westwood Avenue on Monday.
See bluebirds, tupelo gum trees on GWF hikes.
Alfredo Rodriguez Arzate is a Mexican gum harvester who, like his Mayan ancestors before him, searches the forests of Chetumal for chico zapote trees.
Sweet gum trees, often called "gumball" trees, are a nuisance because each one annually drops hundreds of round, prickly seed capsules that can be easy to slip on when walking and are difficult to clean up SJ-R file.
Local media said the astonished canoeists put the animal on an embankment at a local golf club where koalas were known to live in the gum trees.
The cry of these birds, clustered in the gray gum trees that shade this dusty pit stop on the Great Northern Highway, triggers memories of a year I once spent in Fremantle, another town on the outback 's verge.
Photos by Ted Buss/Special to the Times Record News Derek Watson, of Complete Lawn Service, maneuvers a stump grinder during final stages of removing a dead sweet gum tree.
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In science:

For example, for black gum as the base species and Carolina ash as the NN species, the cell count is 26 which is 13 % of the 205 black gums (which is 28 % of all trees).
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Observe that the percentages and Figure 9 are suggestive of segregation for all tree species, especially for Carolina ashes, water tupelos, black gums, and the “other” trees since the observed percentages of species with themselves as the NN are much larger than the row percentages.
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Black gums and Carolina ashes are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gums and bald cypresses are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gum and other trees are significantly segregated for all the distances plotted.
Overall and Pairwise Segregation Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
We will only consider the three most frequent tree species in this data set (i.e., water tupelos, black gums, and Carolina ashes).
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
For example, for black gum as the base species and Carolina ash as the NN species, the cell count is 31 which is 15 % of the 205 black gums (which is 36 % of all trees).
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Figure 10: The scatter plot of the locations of water tupelos (circles ◦), black gum trees (triangles △), and Carolina ashes (pluses +).
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Table 8: The NNCT for swamp tree data and the corresponding percentages (in parentheses), where the cell percentages are with respect to the row sums and marginal percentages are with respect to the total size. W.T. = water tupelos, B.G. = black gums, and C.A. = Carolina ashes.
New Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
For example, for black gum as the base species and Carolina ash as the NN species, the cell count is 26 which is 13 % of the 205 black gums (which is 28 % of all trees), and 15 % of the 171 times Carolina ashes serves as NN (which is 23 % of all trees).
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Observe that the percentages and Figure 3 are suggestive of segregation for all tree species, especially for Carolina ashes, water tupelos, black gums, and the “other” trees since the observed percentage of species with themselves as the NN is much larger than the marginal (row or column) percentages.
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Figure 3: The scatter plot of the locations of water tupelos (triangles △), black gum trees (pluses +), Carolina ashes (crosses ×), bald cypress trees (diamonds ⋄), and other trees (inverse triangles ▽).
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Black gums and Carolina ashes are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gums and bald cypresses are significantly segregated for t > 2 m; black gum and other trees are significantly segregated for all the distances plotted.
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Wide dashed lines around 0 are the upper and lower 95 % confidence bounds for the L-functions based on Monte Carlo simulations under the CSR independence pattern. W.T. = water tupelo, B.G. = black gum, C.A. = Carolina ash, B.C. = bald cypress, and O.T. = other tree species.
Class-Specific Tests of Spatial Segregation Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
The plot contains 13 different tree species, of which we only consider two, namely, bald cypress (Taxodium distichum ) and black gum trees (Nyssa sylvatica ).
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Figure 7: Ripley’s univariate L-functions (top row) bLii (t) − t for i = 0, 1, 2, where i = 0 stands for all data combined, i = 1 for black gums, and i = 2 for bald cypresses; and pair correlation functions g (t) for all trees combined and for each species (bottom row).
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
Table 12: The NNCT for swamp tree data and the corresponding percentages (in parenthesis). B.G. = black gum trees, B.C. = bald cypress trees.
Directional Clustering Tests Based on Nearest Neighbor Contingency Tables
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