glaze

Definitions

  • Some Jamestown houses had leaded glazed wrought-iron window casements similar to the ones shown here. (Courtesy, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.)
    Some Jamestown houses had leaded glazed wrought-iron window casements similar to the ones shown here. (Courtesy, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.)
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v glaze become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance "Her eyes glaze over when she is bored"
    • v glaze coat with a glaze "the potter glazed the dishes","glaze the bread with eggwhite"
    • v glaze coat with something sweet, such as a hard sugar glaze
    • v glaze furnish with glass "glass the windows"
    • n glaze a coating for ceramics, metal, etc.
    • n glaze a glossy finish on a fabric
    • n glaze any of various thin shiny (savory or sweet) coatings applied to foods
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Additional illustrations & photos:

A few examples of lead-glazed earthenware made in England during the 17th century. All were unearthed at Jamestown A few examples of lead-glazed earthenware made in England during the 17th century. All were unearthed at Jamestown
Examples of lead-glazed earthenware made at Jamestown about 1640-50 Examples of lead-glazed earthenware made at Jamestown about 1640-50
A few examples of German salt-glazed stoneware in the Jamestown collection. All were made during the 17th century A few examples of German salt-glazed stoneware in the Jamestown collection. All were made during the 17th century

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Glaze A glazing oven. See Glost oven.
    • Glaze (Cookery) Broth reduced by boiling to a gelatinous paste, and spread thinly over braised dishes.
    • Glaze The vitreous coating of pottery or porcelain; anything used as a coating or color in glazing. See Glaze v. t., 3.
    • Glaze (Paint) To apply thinly a transparent or semitransparent color to (another color), to modify the effect.
    • v. i Glaze To become glazed of glassy.
    • Glaze (Cookery) To cover (a donut, cupcake, meat, etc.) with a thin layer of edible syrup, or other substance which may solidify to a glossy coating. The material used for glazing is usually sweet or highly flavored.
    • Glaze To furnish (a window, a house, a sash, a case, etc.) with glass. "Two cabinets daintily paved, richly handed, and glazed with crystalline glass."
    • Glaze To incrust, cover, or overlay with a thin surface, consisting of, or resembling, glass; as, to glaze earthenware; hence, to render smooth, glasslike, or glossy; as, to glaze paper, gunpowder, and the like. "Sorrow's eye glazed with blinding tears."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • glaze To place or fasten glass in; furnish or set with glass, as a window, case, frame, or the like; cover with glass, as a picture.
    • glaze To cover, incrust, or overlay with something resembling glass in appearance or effect; cover with a shining vitreous or glairy substance; hence, to make glossy or glass-like in appearance: as, to glaze earthenware; to glaze, pastry, cloth, or paper.
    • glaze Specifically, in oil-painting, to cover, as a picture or parts of a picture, with a thin coat of transparent color to modify the tone.
    • glaze To cause to shine; polish.
    • glaze I. To shine; be brilliant.
    • glaze To assume a dim glassy luster; become overspread with a semi-transparent film.
    • n glaze A vitrifiable substance applied to the surface of fine pottery, stoneware, and porcelain. It is either a substance which can be applied directly to the biscuit in liquid form, or one, as common salt, the vapors of which, when it is placed in the furnace with the ware, will affect the surface of the latter in the manner desired. Porcelain glaze is an example of the first kind, and is a sort of translucent glass which combines with the paste sufficiently to form a perfect union with it, but retains a slight thickness through which the paste is seen. Salt glaze is the commonest instance of the second variety. Also called couverte, covering, glazing.
    • n glaze A bright polish or glazed appearance on any surface.
    • n glaze In oil-painting, a thin layer of transparent color spread over a painted surface.
    • n glaze Stock evaporated to a thin paste by boiling, and applied to meats to give them a polished surface.
    • n glaze A surface coating or sheet of ice.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Glaze glāz to furnish or set with glass: to cover with a thin surface of glass or something glassy: to give a glassy surface to
    • n Glaze the glassy coating put upon pottery: any shining exterior
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Quotations

  • Otto Von Bismarck
    Otto%20Von%20Bismarck
    “Anyone who has ever looked into the glazed eyes of a soldier dying on the battlefield will think hard before starting a war.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. glasen, glazen, fr. glas,. See Glass

Usage

In literature:

She crashed them down on the glazed white surface in front of him.
"Gigolo" by Edna Ferber
A Zuni window glazed with selenite 197 91.
"Eighth Annual Report" by Various
It was the latest fashion in domestic glazing.
"Clayhanger" by Arnold Bennett
The name is derived from the glazed or polished surface of the leaves.
"The Field and Garden Vegetables of America" by Fearing Burr
They were similarly glazed outside as the edges proved, but this has perished.
"The Journal of Negro History, Volume 6, 1921" by Various
In 1893 this window was glazed with stained glass by Rev.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Abbey Church of Tewkesbury" by H. J. L. J. Massé
The face was purple; the bloodshot eyes were glazed.
"Bloom of Cactus" by Robert Ames Bennet
Taking Glaze Out of Grindstone.
"Practical Mechanics for Boys" by J. S. Zerbe
Some of greater pretension had windows that looked as though they were glazed.
"The White Chief" by Mayne Reid
It was the Dutch who taught the English how to use the potter's wheel and glaze and burn earthenware.
"Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 13" by Elbert Hubbard
King fixed his glazing eyes upon her.
"Rookwood" by William Harrison Ainsworth
Willem's wide-open eyes were glazed like a sleep-walker's.
"The Return of Peter Grimm" by David Belasco
The puff-paste must always be glazed with the yolk of eggs.
"The Italian Cook Book" by Maria Gentile
This glazing is quite hard, and breaks up into angular pieces.
"Our Common Insects" by Alpheus Spring Packard
His hysterical eyes glazed and closed; his face relaxed.
"The Planet Strappers" by Raymond Zinke Gallun
When the work is quite dry, go over all with a glaze of Prussian blue mixed with Brunswick black.
"Practical Taxidermy" by Montagu Browne
Hermann, was hired to glaze them.
"The Care of Books" by John Willis Clark
Two are heads of men and two of women, only one of each being glazed.
"Portuguese Architecture" by Walter Crum Watson
He is attired in a red shirt, top boots, and a glazed cap.
"The Pearl of the Antilles, or An Artist in Cuba" by Walter Goodman
Rum glaze is made the same as Maraschino Glaze.
"Desserts and Salads" by Gesine Lemcke
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In poetry:

No kind friend to sit beside them,
Or to close the glazing eye;
Naught save the cold stars above them,
Keeping watch, as thus they die.
"Caleb's Vision" by Alfred Gibbs Campbell
The night is dark, the stinging sleet,
Swept by the bitter gusts of air,
Drives whistling down the lonely street,
And glazes on the pavement bare.
"The Forlorn" by James Russell Lowell
He paused and then his goblet fill'd,
But never touch'd his lips the brim,
His arm was stay'd, his pulses still'd,
And ah! his glazing eyes grew dim.
"Forty Years After" by John Marchborn Cooley
He loves the haggard frame, the shattered mind,
Gloats with delight upon the glazing eye,
Yet, in one thing, His cruelty is kind,
He sends them lovely dreams before they die;
"Malaria" by Laurence Hope
The Man
He lies forgotten 'neath the watching skies,
the blood upon his bayonet scarlet bright;
the red moon shining in his glazed eyes,
the 'Last Post' crying, crying in the night.
"The Three Concerned" by Leon Gellert
Yet not alone! for in thy ear, and on thy glazing eye,
Were angel whispers breathed, and dawned the Sun of Glory's sky;
And when thy daughter stood and gazed upon thy tranquil face,
It seemed to her thy features wore a calm celestial grace.
"Lines On The Death of My Mother" by Janet Hamilton

In news:

ChoLon's Tamarind -Glazed Lamb Shank.
Sweet & Tangy Soy-Glazed Salmon: Quick prep work for an easy dinner any night.
Tangy mustard glaze, pecans add kick and crunch to dinnertime.
Maple- Tarragon Glazed Turkey with Orange Gravy.
Teaism 's Miso-Glazed Sweet Potatoes.
Our weekend chef makes a Cowboy steak Japanese style with a Ginger-Wasabi teriyaki glaze.
STP1168 Science and Technology of Building Seals, Sealants, Glazing, and Waterproofing .
Fired with reactive glazes, the ceramic­ blossoms are then fitted with a single keyhole for quick installation.
Maple-glazed pork belly nestles on the bakery's chewy pretzel bread and, when dipped in egg, the pretzel bread turns into Yolk 's delightfully savory French toast.
From spa an bath salts to salt-glazed potter, salt tiles to cook and serve on, and food that you wouldn't normally pair with salt.
Chef Alli's Bacon -Pork Chops with BBQ Glaze.
Bacon -Pork Chops with BBQ Glaze Recipe from PorkBeInspired.com.
About 10 minutes before chicken in done, mix the glaze and pour over the chicken to finish cooking.
I started counting how many drinks he was having during the set and I could see him getting more and more glazed.
Here, she uses honey to glaze baby carrots and two kinds of baby beets .
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In science:

One can also mention other examples from material science, like cracking in glazes, fracture and dewetting of polymer films above their glass transition temperature -.
Inhomogenous Poisson Networks and Random Cellular Structures
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