ginger

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj ginger (used especially of hair or fur) having a bright orange-brown color "a man with gingery hair and bright blue eyes","a ginger kitten"
    • v ginger add ginger to in order to add flavor "ginger the soup"
    • n ginger liveliness and energy "this tonic is guaranteed to give you more pep"
    • n ginger pungent rhizome of the common ginger plant; used fresh as a seasoning especially in Asian cookery
    • n ginger dried ground gingerroot
    • n ginger perennial plants having thick branching aromatic rhizomes and leafy reedlike stems
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In India, pickled ginger, minced mutton and a cottage cheese like substance are popular pizza toppings
    • Ginger (Bot) A plant of the genus Zingiber, of the East and West Indies. The species most known is Zingiber officinale.
    • Ginger The hot and spicy rootstock of Zingiber officinale, which is much used in cookery and in medicine.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: In 1938, Cliquot Club ginger ale was the first soft drink to be canned
    • n ginger The rhizome, and also the light-yellow substance of the rhizome, of Zingiber officinale a reed-like perennial plant with annual leafy stems 3 or 4 feet high, and flowers in conical spikes borne on distinct leafless stems. The species is a native of the warmer parts of Asia, though not known in a wild state; it is extensively cultivated throughout tropical Asia, and has been introduced into most other tropical countries. The rhizome has a peculiar agreeable, aromatic odor and a pungent taste, and its substance has been in use as a spice from the remotest times. It is distinguished as black or white, according as it retains its dark integument or has had it removed by scraping. The kind now most esteemed is known as Jamaica ginger, and comes mainly from the island of Jamaica. In medicine ginger is used as a carminative stimulant, and externally as a rubefacient and anodyne, but it is employed much more largely as a condiment than as a drug.
    • ginger Made of or flavored with ginger.
    • ginger Brittle; tender; delicate.
    • n ginger In the West Indies, any one of several species belonging to the genera Costus and Alpinia (Renealmia of many authors).
    • ginger To put some ‘ginger’ into (a person); shake up; revive.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Ginger has been clinically demonstrated to work twice as well as Dramamine for fighting motion sickness, with no side effects.
    • n Ginger jin′jėr the root of a plant in the East and West Indies, with a hot and spicy taste, useful as a condiment or stomachic
    • ***

Quotations

  • Bob Thaves
    Bob Thaves
    “Remember, Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, but she did it backwards and in high heels.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. ginger, gingever, gingivere, OF. gengibre, gingimbre, F. gingembre, L. zingiber, zingiberi, fr. Gr. ; of Oriental origin; cf. Ar. & Pers. zenjebīl, fr. Skr. çṛṅgavëra, prop., hornshaped; ga, horn + vëra, body
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
M. E. gingivere—O. Fr. gengibre—L. zingiber—Gr. zingiberis—Sans. çriñga-veraçriñga, horn, vera, shape.

Usage

In literature:

Sure enough, it was ginger.
"The Boy Settlers" by Noah Brooks
The ginger must be steeped over-night, that you may be able to cut it.
"The Lady's Own Cookery Book, and New Dinner-Table Directory;" by Charlotte Campbell Bury
Tea being exhausted, the soldiers boiled bits of ginger root in water.
"The Story of the Great War, Volume V (of 8)"
Dexter handed it to the captain who opened it gingerly.
"Traffic in Souls" by Eustace Hale Ball
Ginger-beer makes an excellent jelly for those who do not wish for wine, and hedozone is also very good.
"Nelson's Home Comforts" by Mary Hooper
Snap and I tested it gingerly.
"Astounding Stories of Super-Science, March 1930" by Various
I would lift the ailing bit of timber to the stool with gingerly caution.
"The Cruise of the Shining Light" by Norman Duncan
Urga got up groggily, feeling gingerly the tender point of his jaw.
"Slaves of Mercury" by Nat Schachner
Who stands ginger-beer at Lucky MacWhae's, answer me that, Jock, ye meeserable wretch?
"Young Barbarians" by Ian Maclaren
Dog's name is Ginger.
"At the Crossroads" by Harriet T. Comstock
Ginger, vanilla, and other things would no doubt flourish here.
"Out on the Pampas" by G. A. Henty
To obtain a good view of the spot I got up very gingerly on top of the parapet, fixed the machine, and filmed the scene.
"How I Filmed the War" by Lieut. Geoffrey H. Malins
She glanced at his preoccupied face, wondering at this unusual indifference to Big Liza's ginger-bread.
"Kildares of Storm" by Eleanor Mercein Kelly
They're just full of ginger, every one of them.
"The Pony Rider Boys in Alaska" by Frank Gee Patchin
Placing her hand gingerly in his, she let him lead her across, then followed meekly up to the low white house.
"Chicken Little Jane on the Big John" by Lily Munsell Ritchie
The courtyard was paved with the uneven stones of another day, and gingerly Bat picked his way across it toward the light.
"Ashton-Kirk, Criminologist" by John T. McIntyre
It's like a beautiful big white monument being more impressive than a lot of ginger-bread architecture.
"Two Little Women" by Carolyn Wells
Powdered ginger Three to ten grains.
"The Dog" by Dinks, Mayhew, and Hutchinson
She had better have refrained from waking up Ginger just at that moment.
"Janice Day" by Helen Beecher Long
He always called me Ginger.
"Davenport Dunn, Volume 2 (of 2) A Man Of Our Day" by Charles James Lever
***

In poetry:

The Ginger Scot o’ a’ Scots,
The warst shade o’ Scot,
For he’ll pay ye naething,
An’ tak’ a’ you’ve got.
"The Scots [A Dirge]" by Henry Lawson
"'Ere's grub whenever you're 'ungry
An' drink whenever you're dry,
An' a ''Appy New Year,'" says Ginger,
And "Same to yourself," says I.
"Eight Bells" by Cicely Fox Smith
Then she gied them the beer and the wine,
And they gied her the ginger;
But she gied them a far better thing,
The goud ring aff her finger.
"Johnie Faa" by Andrew Lang
‘Lo, Ginger . . . ‘lo, Mike . . .
Where you been this long while
Since you an’ me was in the ol’ Mona’s Isle? . . .
Oh, jus’ moseyin’ around like. . . .
"Wapping: Conversation Piece" by Cicely Fox Smith
He ain't got enny kind ov show
To hear the merry pealins'
Of them thar weddin' bells, unless
He kind ov stirs her feelins'--
By treatin' her tew ginger pop,
An' pilin' peanuts in a-top.
"Old Spense" by Isabella Valancy Crawford
'Ow everlastin' keen I was on gettin' to the front!
I'd ginger for a dozen, and I 'elped to bear the brunt;
But Cheese and Crust! I'm crazy, now I've done me little stunt,
To sniff the air of Blighty in the mawnin'.
"Going Home" by Robert W Service

In news:

A Southern Ginger Ale With Sting in Its Tail.
Try chef Tyler Florence's recipe for Pork Tenderloin with Ginger Ale Sauce, a dinner dish from his complete seven-day menu.
Ginger beer is a soft drink made with the rhizome that flavors many Asian cuisines.
It's not ginger ale, being spicier and less sweet than that cousin.
Ginger beer was brewed in the field by the British Army in the mid-1700s.
Exploring the Valley's ginger obsession, from the farm to the bar.
Making ginger beer is easier than you might think.
Born a century ago, Ginger Rogers blossomed on screen in the 1930s but her show business career lasted more than 60 years.
Courtesy of the Ginger Rogers Estate.
With ginger appearing in all types of food, there's never been a better time to learn how to pair it with wine.
With ginger appearing in all types of food, from savory to sweet, Asian to American, there's never been a better time to learn how to pair it with wine.
Gingerly , Owens does support Obama.
Obama and Romney Debate Gun Control, Gingerly .
Gingerly , GOP Contenders Address Payroll Tax Cut.
Obama Steps Gingerly Into the Culture Wars.
***