galago

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n galago agile long-tailed nocturnal African lemur with dense woolly fur and large eyes and ears
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The only animals that are capable of turning their heads 180 degrees are from the genus Galago, such as the Tarsier
    • n Galago (Zoöl) A genus of African lemurs, including numerous species.☞ The grand galago Galago crassicaudata) is about the size of a cat; the mouse galago G. murinus)is about the size of a mouse.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n galago [NL.] The typical genus of the subfamily Galagininæ, containing the true galagos of Africa, of the size of a squirrel and upward. One of the best-known species is the squirrellemur, G. senegalensis, also called Otolicnus galago, extensively distributed in Africa; the thick-tailed galago is G. crassicaudatus, about a foot long, the tail 16 inches; others are G. mahali and G. demidoffi. The larger and smaller forms of the genus are sometimes separated under the names Otolemur and Otolicnus respectively. One of the least of the latter is G. murinus, only about 4 inches long.
    • n galago [lowercase; pl. galagos (-gōz).] A species or individual of the genus Galago or subfamily Galagininæ. See gum-animal.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Galago ga-lā′go a genus of large-eared, long-tailed African lemurs, arboreal and nocturnal in habit, living on fruit and insects.
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Native name

Usage

In literature:

I, the Indri; II, the true Lemurs; III, the slow Lemurs and IV, the Galagos.
"Natural History in Anecdote" by Various
The Galagos are chiefly nocturnal, and are more or less omnivorous.
"The Cambridge Natural History, Vol X., Mammalia" by Frank Evers Beddard
***

In news:

According to the study, the world's most endangered primate species include Red Ruffed Lemur, Rondo dwarf galago, Madame Berthe's Mouse Lemur, Roloway monkey, and Grauer's gorilla.
***

In science:

Primates like Galagos (bushbabies) have been documented to perform this double jump behavior to reach a higher platform .
Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot
***