funeral pyre

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n funeral pyre wood heaped for burning a dead body as a funeral rite
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Funeral pyre a structure of combustible material, upon which a dead body is placed to be reduced to ashes, as part of a funeral rite; a pyre.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

The wagon was to be the wretched Manuelito's funeral pyre.
"Sunset Pass" by Charles King
Gloomy the old vassal prepared the funeral pyre of his mistress.
"Bakemono Yashiki (The Haunted House)" by James S. De Benneville
We ought to have had a funeral pyre.
"A Canyon Voyage" by Frederick S. Dellenbaugh
As their household gods, they formed little idols of the ashes from the funeral pyres of their great men, kneading them with clay.
"The Annals of the Cakchiquels" by Daniel G. Brinton
Many of the fallen lay unseen amid the ravines and hollows, and the burning forest was their funeral pyre.
"Before the Dawn" by Joseph Alexander Altsheler
Hercules was compelled to ascend the funeral pyre, and there be burned alive.
"Architects of Fate" by Orison Swett Marden
His attendant winds and voices had been sacrificed on his funeral pyre.
"The Daughters of Danaus" by Mona Caird
In India women leap on the funeral pyre of a dead husband.
"The Wedding Ring" by T. De Witt Talmage
Then he looked at the orange glow that marked the funeral pyre of the ship.
"The Quantum Jump" by Robert Wicks
An island in the lagoons devoted to funeral pyres is a solemn and ennobling conception.
"New Italian sketches" by John Addington Symonds
By midnight the dreadful funeral pyre was completed.
"The Call Of The South" by Louis Becke
The island grove was like a great funeral pyre.
"In The Boyhood of Lincoln" by Hezekiah Butterworth
The last words of Myrrha on the funereal pyre are in good keeping with the grand conception of her character.
"My Recollections of Lord Byron" by Teresa Guiccioli
This light came from the funeral pyre of Francoise and the old man.
"The Son of Monte Christo" by Jules Lermina
So, too, the Hindoo widows used to laugh when seated on the funeral pyre ready to be burnt.
"More Science From an Easy Chair" by Sir E. Ray (Edwin Ray) Lankester
Already one body had been placed on a funeral pyre of wood.
"The Critic in the Orient" by George Hamlin Fitch
There is no escaping the funeral-pyre in Bali.
"Where the Strange Trails Go Down" by E. Alexander Powell
During nine days wood was collected and brought, in carts drawn by oxen, to the site of the funeral pyre.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3" by Various
The Greatest Funeral Pyre in History.
"The Johnstown Horror" by James Herbert Walker
This self-immolation, like that of the burning of widows upon their husband's funeral pyres, has latterly been suppressed.
"Due West" by Maturin Murray Ballou
***

In poetry:

Pointless your mourning and your toil
Helpless your curses dire
Past forms no miracle can bring
Back from funereal pyre.
"Pointless Your Morning" by Adam Asnyk
As Lot's wife, in her flight, could not refrain
From viewing foul Gomorrah's funeral pyre,
From one last glance across that ancient plain,
At guilty Sodom wreathed in vengeful fire;
"From A Saxon Legend." by Alfred Castner King
From his meridian throne the eye of day
Beheld the kindlings of the funeral fire,
Where, like a war-worn Roman chieftain, lay
Upon his pyre
The poet of the broken heart and broken lyre.
"Shelley's Obsequies" by Nathan Covington Brooks
Rarest woods were coarse and rough,
Sweetest spice not sweet enough,
Too impure all earthly fire
For this sacred funeral-pyre;
These rich relics must suffice
For their own dear sacrifice.
"On Burning Some Old Letters" by James Russell Lowell
We see the trees in beauty clad,
But still that beauty makes us sad,
E'en while we may admire,
For death has caus'd that sudden bloom
Stern death, the tenant of the tomb,
Or funereal pyre.
"Autumn" by Thomas Frederick Young
Saw far off aspire,
With crash of mine and gate,
From a single pyre
The myriad flames of fate,
Soul by soul transfigured in funereal fire,
Hate made weak by love, and love made strong by hate.
"Ode On The Insurrection In Candia" by Algernon Charles Swinburne