fulminate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v fulminate cause to explode violently and with loud noise
    • v fulminate come on suddenly and intensely "the disease fulminated"
    • v fulminate criticize severely "He fulminated against the Republicans' plan to cut Medicare","She railed against the bad social policies"
    • n fulminate a salt or ester of fulminic acid
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Fulminate (Chem) A salt of fulminic acid. See under Fulminic.
    • Fulminate To cause to explode.
    • Fulminate To issue or send forth decrees or censures with the assumption of supreme authority; to thunder forth menaces.
    • Fulminate To thunder; hence, to make a loud, sudden noise; to detonate; to explode with a violent report.
    • Fulminate To utter or send out with denunciations or censures; -- said especially of menaces or censures uttered by ecclesiastical authority. "They fulminated the most hostile of all decrees."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • fulminate To lighten; flash with detonation.
    • fulminate Hence To explode with a loud noise; detonate.
    • fulminate Figuratively, to issue threats, denunciations, censures, and the like, with or as with authority.
    • fulminate In refining, to become suddenly bright and uniform in color: said of melted gold mixed with antimony.
    • fulminate To cause to explode.
    • fulminate Figuratively, to utter or send out, as a denunciation or censure; especially, to send out, as a menace or censure, by ecclesiastical authority.
    • n fulminate A compound formed by the union of a base with fulminic acid. The fulminates are very unstable bodies, exploding with great violence by percussion or heating. Fulminate of mercury, or fulminating mercury, is used in percussion-caps and detonators for nitroglycerin preparations.
    • n fulminate An explosion; a sudden and explosive action.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Fulminate ful′min-āt to thunder or make a loud noise: to issue decrees with violence, or with menaces of grave censure
    • v.t Fulminate to cause to explode: to send forth, as a denunciation—(Milt.) Ful′mine
    • n Fulminate a compound of fulminic acid with mercury, &c
    • n Fulminate a thunderbolt, explosive
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. fulminatus, p. p. of fulminare, to lighten, strike with lightning, fr. fulmen, thunderbolt, fr. fulgere, to shine. See Fulgent, and cf. Fulmine

Usage

In literature:

This speech was the conclusion of dreadful catalinics, internally fulminated.
"The Petty Troubles of Married Life, Complete" by Honore de Balzac
At length the sentence of excommunication was fulminated against the king.
"The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12)" by Edmund Burke
He little dreamed what ears heard his fulminations and what deadly peril threatened him.
"Historical Tales, Vol 5 (of 15)" by Charles Morris
Instantly Suvy's old-time fulminate was jarred into violent response.
"The Furnace of Gold" by Philip Verrill Mighels
When the Council rejected his Bill, he indulged in threats and fulminations which would have done credit to a Berryite of the Berryites.
"Town Life in Australia" by R. E. N. (Richard) Twopeny
After all your fulminations against the tribe!
"Dangerous Ages" by Rose Macaulay
Jovis fulmine ardenti pectus ejus percussit.
"The Evolution of the Dragon" by G. Elliot Smith
During this fulmination, Holland stood very quiet, and when he was about to depart, he begged permission to speak a few words.
"Fox's Book of Martyrs" by John Foxe
Who fulminate o'er my father's land, protect him!
"The Works of Lord Byron" by Lord Byron
It's easier to fulminate than to fight.
"Jewel Weed" by Alice Ames Winter
In very early ages Charlemagne and his successors fulminated their wrath against them in common with sorcerers.
"Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds" by Charles Mackay
Both utter threats, oaths, angry fulminations.
"The Flag of Distress" by Mayne Reid
Agamemnon, meanwhile, remembered a recipe he had read somewhere for making a "fulminating paste" of iron-filings and powder of brimstone.
"The Peterkin Papers" by Lucretia P Hale
All the pulpits began to fulminate against him.
"The Doctrines of Predestination, Reprobation, and Election" by Robert Wallace
Hence he fulminates a general and sweeping condemnation against all that exists out of man.
"The Life or Legend of Gaudama" by Right Reverend Paul Ambroise Bigandet
Just peruse this document, which I have just fulminated.
"The Orpheus C. Kerr Papers. Series 2" by Robert H. Newell
All the percussion cap makers {25} are indebted to Howard and Brugnatelli for fulminating silver.
"The Scientific Basis of National Progress" by George Gore
Hartmann's fulminating speeches have made them all red hot.
"Success and How He Won It" by E. Werner
The prophet of that day fulminated against the economic evils of society.
"The Literature of Ecstasy" by Albert Mordell
He knew this, without the threat which Ravener had fulminated in such positive terms.
"The Maroon" by Mayne Reid
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In news:

Fulminant pneumonia with cavitary destruction of lung parenchyma.
Fulminant Clostridium difficile Colitis—Invited Critique.
This review confirms the substantial mortality associated with fulminant C difficile colitis (FCDC).
So Colin Powell, fulminating about the economy (as if he is an expert on that.
The feeling is accentuated by Andersen's off-camera voice — angrily fulminating, lamenting long-gone hamburger joints.
Fulminant Clostridium difficile Colitis—Invited Critique.
Fulminant pneumonia with cavitary destruction of lung parenchyma.
In this article, we report a case of myxoid liposarcoma of the supraclavicular fossa with a fulminant course.
Acute fulminant cecal volvulus ischemic bowel with pseudomembranous colitis (Online Only).
The disease is usually mild, except in pregnant women, who have a high case-fatality rate from fulminant hepatic failure.
And Ryan certainly did his share of anti-Obama fulminating.
In stark contrast (I hope) to the thumbsucking and fulminating about the horrific events in Aurora, Colo.
While Thomas's fulminations are heartfelt, they border on the repetitious.
So Colin Powell , fulminating about the economy (as if he is an expert on that.
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