fluxion

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n fluxion a flow or discharge
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Fluxion A constantly varying indication.
    • Fluxion (Math) A method of analysis developed by Newton, and based on the conception of all magnitudes as generated by motion, and involving in their changes the notion of velocity or rate of change. Its results are the same as those of the differential and integral calculus, from which it differs little except in notation and logical method.
    • Fluxion (Med) An unnatural or excessive flow of blood or fluid toward any organ; a determination.
    • Fluxion Fusion; the running of metals into a fluid state.
    • n Fluxion The act of flowing.
    • Fluxion (Math) The infinitely small increase or decrease of a variable or flowing quantity in a certain infinitely small and constant period of time; the rate of variation of a fluent; an incerement; a differential.
    • Fluxion The matter that flows.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n fluxion The act of flowing; fluxation; change.
    • n fluxion That which flows; that which changes; a flux.
    • n fluxion Specifically— In medicine: An abnormal flow or determination of blood or other humor to any organ, as the brain; active hyperemia. A catarrh.
    • n fluxion The running or reduction of metals to a fluid state; fusion.
    • n fluxion Something, as an indication, which constantly varies.
    • n fluxion In mathematics, the rate of change of a continuously varying quantity; the differential coefficient relatively to the time. A fluxion is denoted by a dot placed over the symbol of the fluent or variable. This term and the method of fluxions (which see, below) were invented by Sir Isaac Newton.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Fluxion a flowing or discharge: a difference or variation: :
    • Fluxion (math.) the rate of change of a continuously varying quantity
    • Fluxion (pl.) the name given after Newton to that branch of mathematics which with a different notation is known after Leibnitz as the differential and integral calculus
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Quotations

  • Edward M. Forster
    Edward%20M.%20Forster
    “Towns are excrescences, gray fluxions, where men, hurrying to find one another, have lost themselves.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. F. fluxion,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr.,—L. fluxusfluĕre, to flow.

Usage

In literature:

Accordingly they either vomit them up again, or suffer from indigestion, whence come gripings, fluxions, and fevers.
"The Golden Sayings of Epictetus" by Epictetus
His theoretic notions were fluent; and when minds less plastic than his own attempted to render those fluxional images rigid, he rebelled.
"Faraday As A Discoverer" by John Tyndall
Brings on white fluxions.
"Ulysses" by James Joyce
The discovery of fluxions, which he claimed, was contested by Leibnitz, and led to a long and bitter controversy between the two philosophers.
"A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature" by John W. Cousin
Mr. Fluxion came on deck with a pair of handcuffs.
"Outward Bound" by Oliver Optic
Oh, by the sowl of Isaac, that invented fluxions, what's this for?
"The Hedge School; The Midnight Mass; The Donagh Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of William Carleton, Volume Three" by William Carleton
Returning to France, he translated Hales's Vegetable Statics and Newton's Treatise on Fluxions.
"Selections from Previous Worksand Remarks on Romanes' Mental Evolution in Animals" by Samuel Butler
Craig is known in the early history of fluxions, and was a good mathematician.
"A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II)" by Augustus De Morgan
At twenty-three he facilitated the calculation of planetary movements by his theory of Fluxions.
"History of the English People, Volume VI (of 8)" by John Richard Green
At the request of the principal, Mr. Fluxion acted as interpreter in the conversation with the Dutch skipper.
"Dikes and Ditches" by Oliver Optic
Mr. Fluxion was the first vice-principal in charge of the Josephine.
"Up The Baltic" by Oliver Optic
Found out a method of infinite series in 1665, and began the invention of Fluxions.
"Pioneers of Science" by Oliver Lodge
Fluxions, query on the controversy about, 103.
"Notes and Queries, Index of Volume 5, January-June, 1852" by Various
He's been having what you call here a 'fluxion of the chest.
"Aurora the Magnificent" by Gertrude Hall
Perhaps some one may ask: Why may not practical efficiency reside in the non-fluxional (or permanent)?
"The Sarva-Darsana-Samgraha" by Madhava Acharya
He understood the doctrine of fluxions, and delighted in his favourite author, Maclaurin.
"Norfolk Annals A Chronological Record of Remarkable Events in the Nineteeth Century, Vol. 1" by Charles Mackie
Occasionally they show a fluxional banding; they may also be spherulitic or vesicular.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 10, Slice 2" by Various
They had not learned the use of logarithms, and were ignorant of fluxions.
"The Works of Daniel Webster, Volume 1" by Daniel Webster
Me mean de fluxion of de quantity.
"Three Hours after Marriage" by John Gay
It is difficult to account for the fragmentary manner of publication of the Fluxional Calculus and for the long delays which took place.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 5" by Various
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In news:

Cellectricon, Fluxion Settle Microfluidic Cellular Analysis IP Dispute.
Fluxion Registers South San Francisco Facility as Medical Device Establishment With FDA.
At a dingy shop in downtown Fluxion City, you can buy, for only $29.95, the suitcase of a desperate man.
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