flake

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v flake come off in flakes or thin small pieces "The paint in my house is peeling off"
    • v flake cover with flakes or as if with flakes
    • v flake form into flakes "The substances started to flake"
    • n flake a small fragment of something broken off from the whole "a bit of rock caught him in the eye"
    • n flake a person with an unusual or odd personality
    • n flake a crystal of snow
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Kellogg?s started selling their most famous product, Corn Flakes, in 1906
    • Flake A little particle of lighted or incandescent matter, darted from a fire; a flash. "With flakes of ruddy fire."
    • Flake A loose filmy mass or a thin chiplike layer of anything; a film; flock; lamina; layer; scale; as, a flake of snow, tallow, or fish. "Lottle flakes of scurf.""Great flakes of ice encompassing our boat."
    • Flake A paling; a hurdle.
    • Flake a person who behaves strangely; a flaky{2} person.
    • Flake A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, for drying codfish and other things. "You shall also, after they be ripe, neither suffer them to have straw nor fern under them, but lay them either upon some smooth table, boards, or flakes of wands, and they will last the longer."
    • Flake (Naut) A small stage hung over a vessel's side, for workmen to stand on in calking, etc.
    • Flake (Bot) A sort of carnation with only two colors in the flower, the petals having large stripes.
    • v. t Flake To form into flakes.
    • v. i Flake To separate in flakes; to peel or scale off.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Corn Flakes were invented after Will Keith Kellogg and his brother Dr. John Harvey Kellogg set about developing a nutritious cereal for the patients of a health resort in 1890
    • n flake A small flat or scale-like particle or fragment of anything; a thin fragment; a scale: as, a flake of tallow; a flake of flint; a flake of snow. As applied to chips or fragments detached from a mass of rock or mineral, flake often refers especially to such chips or fragments produced in the process of making stone weapons, especially in prehistoric times. Flint and obsidian are the materials which, in consequence of their characteristically conchoidal fracture, can most readily be made to take a desired form by chipping or flaking; but when these were not to be had, chert, jasper, quartz, and even rocks of various kinds, have been utilized in this way. There are many localities where these chips or flakes (as the larger and more regular chips are sometimes designated), cores, broken tools, stone hammers, and other similar relics, are found heaped together in large quantities, indicating the abandoned sites of workshops.
    • n flake Among florists, any variety of carnation in which the petals are marked with stripes of one color upon a white ground.
    • flake To break or separate in flakes or layers; peel or scale off: absolutely or with off.
    • flake To form or break into flakes: as, the frost flaked off the plaster.
    • flake To cover with or as with flakes; fleck.
    • n flake A hurdle or portable framework of wicker, boards, or bars, for fencing; a fence; a paling.
    • n flake Nautical, a small stage hung over a ship's side, from which to calk or repair any breach.
    • n flake A platform for drying salted fish; a fish-flake. It keeps the fish clean, and allows a current of air to pass under them, so that they dry evenly. It may consist of a series of horizontal hurdles at a convenient height from the ground, or of three-edged strips of wood nailed to frames resting on trestles or horses, with one edge uppermost so that the pickle may easily drain away. Flakes are usually made so that they can be taken down and put up when required.
    • n flake A rack for bacon.
    • n flake A wooden frame for oat-cakes.
    • n flake A sort of flap fastened to a saddle to keep the rider's knee from contact with the horse.
    • n flake Same as fake.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Frosted Flakes mascot "Tony the Tiger" has a wife, son (Tony Jr.) and daughter (Antoinette) that were used in early advertising commercials
    • n Flake flāk a small flat layer or film of anything: a very small loose mass, as of snow or wool
    • v.t Flake to form into flakes
    • n Flake flāk (Scot.) a movable hurdle for fencing; (naut.) a stage hung over a ship's side for caulking, &c.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. Icel. flakna, to flake off, split, flagna, to flake off, Sw. flaga, flaw, flake, flake, plate, Dan. flage, snowflake. Cf. Flag a flat stone
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Scand.; cf. Ice. flake; Dut. vlaak.

Usage

In literature:

He could also feel flakes of snow on his face.
"The Bobbsey Twins at Home" by Laura Lee Hope
Drain off the juice from a can of salmon, and flake, picking out every fragment of bone and skin.
"Good Things to Eat as Suggested by Rufus" by Rufus Estes
Flake cold cooked bluefish and mix it with an equal quantity of mashed potatoes.
"How to Cook Fish" by Olive Green
Bottles containing chips and flakes of obsidian and agate, from ancient pueblo on mesa.
"Illustrated Catalogue of the Collections Obtained from the Indians of New Mexico in 1880" by James Stevenson
Small grooved axe of schistose rock, much flaked off at each end.
"Illustrated Catalogue Of The Collections Obtained From The Indians Of New Mexico And Arizona In 1879" by James Stevenson
Later on, the snow-flakes flutter silently and sparely through the lifeless air.
"Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete" by John Symonds
Not a flake of flint was seen.
"Archeological Investigations" by Gerard Fowke
If the fish is to be used in flakes, the flakes will separate more easily while the fish is still hot.
"Salads, Sandwiches and Chafing-Dish Dainties" by Janet McKenzie Hill
All this time it continued to rain hard, with mingled flakes of snow.
"Left on Labrador" by Charles Asbury Stephens
A few feathery flakes began falling now, and there was the promise of more in the clouds overhead, and in the sighing of the North wind.
"The Moving Picture Girls Snowbound" by Laura Lee Hope
They wandered to the flakes and on to the salt works.
"Some Three Hundred Years Ago" by Edith Gilman Brewster
See how the torch-flakes shake their gleaming locks?
"The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus" by Caius Valerius Catullus
The flakes were of the largest size, and coming down thickly to the tune of a moaning wind.
"The Grammar School Boys Snowbound" by H. Irving Hancock
A few flakes of snow began to fall, which every instant increased in number.
"Manco, the Peruvian Chief" by W.H.G. Kingston
Each flake was a flower with six leaves.
"Rivers of Ice" by R.M. Ballantyne
It was early in the season for such a shower, consequently the flakes were large.
"The Crew of the Water Wagtail" by R.M. Ballantyne
Sometimes the cloud flakes are less solid and look like the foam in the wake of a steamer.
"The Boy with the U. S. Weather Men" by Francis William Rolt-Wheeler
But it is after the snow-storms, when the ground is white with the downy flakes, that the Snow-birds become the most friendly.
"Illustrated Science for Boys and Girls" by Anonymous
Fine flakes at first, but with a steadiness that betokened a real snowstorm.
"Patty's Social Season" by Carolyn Wells
Foam flakes cloud the hurrying blast, Love alone will last.
"The Opened Shutters" by Clara Louise Burnham
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In poetry:

With flowers or snow-flakes for its sod,
Around the seasons ran,
And evermore the love of God
Rebuked the fear of man.
"The Old Burying-Ground" by John Greenleaf Whittier
Great gold-flakes from the starry sky
Fell flashing on the deep:
One scent of moist earth floating by,
Almost it made me weep.
"Songs of the Spring Nights" by George MacDonald
And now the winter snow-flakes lie
All on thy widow'd wing;
Trembler! methinks I hear thee sigh
For the silver days of spring.
"To A Storm-Staid Bird" by Thomas Stoddart
What hath he to do with rabble?
Froth is better than their babble;
Let him toss them flakes of froth,
To pronounce his scorn and wrath.
"Lita of the Nile" by Richard Doddridge Blackmore
And shakes, shakes, shakes
His mantle that holds the snows
Till the mute and silent flake,
Its purity throws
O'er all the dreary earth.
"The Rape Of The Flowers" by Samuel Alfred Beadle
Oh, the snow, the beautiful snow,
How the flakes gather and laugh as they go
Whirling about in maddening fun:
Chasing, Laughing, Hurrying by.
"Beautiful Snow" by Joseph Warren Watson

In news:

Quite a bit of it, though the precious metal was in flakes and not nuggets.
Kmart employee Sabrina Smith hands Debbie Flake her layaway purchases in the store's layaway department on Thursday morning.
Italian man-child Mario Balotelli flake with formidable talent.
Floyd Flake blessed Bill Thompson's campaign for mayor.
"I'm on board with Bill," Flake — pastor of Greater Allen AME Church in Jamaica.
Ray Suarez talks to US Representative turned Senator-elect Jeff Flake , R-Ariz.
Characters wrestle with real-life problems in Sharon Flake 's 'Pinned'.
"Pinned," like many of Ms Flake 's earlier works, is set in an urban high school.
We will all find something to take away from Ms Flake 's realistic and memorable new work, "Pinned.".
Chester Flake is running for a spot on the Jefferson County School Board in District 4.
Kirkpatrick Returns To Congress, Obama Is Re-Elected, Flake Wins Senate Seat.
MSNBC projected that Republican Representative Jeff Flake won the US Senate seat for Arizona in Tuesday's election.
Flake , who has been a member of the House of Representatives since 2003, defeated Richard Carmona, a former US Surgeon General.
Flake and his wife, Cheryl, live in Mesa, Ariz.
Keys to Republican Jeff Flake 's victory in the battle for Arizona's open US Senate seat.
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In science:

Flake A was measured with two current paths along θ ≈ 20◦ and 70◦ .
Rippled Graphene in an In-Plane Magnetic Field: Effects of a Random Vector Potential
Flake et al. give what appears to be a very successful algorithm, at least in the context of the Web, based on a maximum flow method.
The structure and function of complex networks
Rev. E 64, 057104 (2001). [338] Pennock, D. M., Flake, G. W., Lawrence, S., Glover, E. J., and Giles, C. L., Winners don’t take all: Characterizing the competition for links on the web, Proc.
The structure and function of complex networks
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