fiord

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n fiord a long narrow inlet of the sea between steep cliffs; common in Norway
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Fiord A narrow inlet of the sea, penetrating between high banks or rocks, as on the coasts of Norway and Alaska.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n fiord A deep indentation of the land, forming a comparatively narrow arm of the sea, with more or less precipitous slopes or cliffs on each side. The coast of Norway offers the best examples. True fiords can exist only where a steep and lofty mountain-range borders closely on the sea.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Fiord fyord name given in Scandinavia to a long, narrow, rock-bound inlet.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Dan. & Norw. fiord,. See Frith
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Norw.

Usage

In literature:

Sweden is a rugged country, its northern part serried by great fiords, its mountains steep and often desolate, its forests thick and many.
"Historic Boyhoods" by Rupert Sargent Holland
In front of it the sea came up into the land and made a fiord.
"Viking Tales" by Jennie Hall
Everywhere about Puget Sound and the adjoining waters are little arms of the sea running up into the land, like the fiords of Northern Europe.
"Life at Puget Sound: With Sketches of Travel in Washington Territory, British Columbia, Oregon and California" by Caroline C. Leighton
But no pines, no peaks, no fiords!
"Robert Elsmere" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
BISHOP SIGURD AT SALTEN FIORD.
"Tales of a Wayside Inn" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
There are only thirty or forty more miles to go, and then we shall enter the Voranger Fiord.
"Condemned as a Nihilist" by George Alfred Henty
The cathedral's slender spires tower over the low town, and are reflected on the surface of the fiord.
"The Sand-Hills of Jutland" by Hans Christian Andersen
As the rays of the sun shot over the fiord, he sprang out of bed and ran to the window.
"Soap-Bubble Stories" by Fanny Barry
In my fiording the pillar of the people has fallen.
"The Cruise of the Betsey" by Hugh Miller
It looks like a piece of lace-work, so numerous are the inlets or fiords.
"ZigZag Journeys in Northern Lands;" by Hezekiah Butterworth
He knows of a house on the Hardanger Fiord, a house in a wood.
"Love and Lucy" by Maurice Henry Hewlett
We passed by Muir Glacier on the other side of the bay, seeking to attain the extreme end of the great fiord.
"Alaska Days with John Muir" by Samual Hall Young
Consulting our maps, and pointing to the mouth of some new fiord, we asked him if it would not afford us a short cut to our destination.
"Memoirs of Life and Literature" by W. H. Mallock
An Inspector sent a boat-load of Eskimo to a fiord to get some grass for his goats.
"Grenfell: Knight-Errant of the North" by Fullerton Waldo
Soon thereafter Frithjof sailed across the fiord to demand the hand of Ingeborg.
"The Standard Cantatas" by George P. Upton
Whoever would see Norway must visit the fiords in a yacht, and not trouble the land much.
"The Galaxy, May, 1877" by Various
Lym-Fiord, breaches made by the sea in, 330.
"Principles of Geology" by Charles Lyell
They formed an insuperable barrier, recalling, but with more wildness, the fiords of Norway.
"Abandoned" by Jules Verne
They took refuge in a coasting schooner, setting sail for the eastern fiords.
"The Bondman" by Hall Caine
Lym-Fiord invaded by the sea, 33. kelp in, 217.
"A Manual of Elementary Geology" by Charles Lyell
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In poetry:

"Even now o'er Njord's sea-meadows
The summer dawn begins
The tun shall have its harvest,
The fiord its glancing fins."
"The Dole Of Jarl Thorkell" by John Greenleaf Whittier
All without the Fiord was quiet
But within it storm and riot,
Such as on his Viking cruises
Raud the Strong was wont to ride.
"Tales Of A Wayside Inn : Part 1. The Musician's Tale; The Saga of King Olaf XI. -- Bishop Sigurd At " by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
As into the Fiord they darted,
On each side the water parted;
Down a path like silver molten
Steadily rowed King Olaf's ships;
"Tales Of A Wayside Inn : Part 1. The Musician's Tale; The Saga of King Olaf XI. -- Bishop Sigurd At " by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Loud the anngy wind was wailing
As King Olaf's ships came sailing
Northward out of Drontheim haven
To the mouth of Salten Fiord.
"Tales Of A Wayside Inn : Part 1. The Musician's Tale; The Saga of King Olaf XI. -- Bishop Sigurd At " by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Then baptized they all that region,
Swarthy Lap and fair Norwegian,
Far as swims the salmon, leaping,
Up the streams of Salten Fiord.
"Tales Of A Wayside Inn : Part 1. The Musician's Tale; The Saga of King Olaf XI. -- Bishop Sigurd At " by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
And King Olaf heard the cry,
Saw the red light in the sky,
Laid his hand upon his sword,
As he leaned upon the railing,
And his ships went sailing, sailing
Northward into Drontheim fiord.
"Tales Of A Wayside Inn : Part 1. The Musician's Tale; The Saga of King Olaf II. -- The King's Return" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In news:

A piece of ice the size of a house crashes into the Rype Fiord from Eielson Glacier in east Greenland.
A boat skims through the melting ice in the Ilulissat fiord, on the western coast of Greenland, in 2008.
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