filiation

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n filiation inherited properties shared with others of your bloodline
    • n filiation the kinship relation between an individual and the individual's progenitors
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Filiation Descent from, or as if from, a parent; relationship like that of a son; as, to determine the filiation of a language.
    • Filiation One that is derived from a parent or source; an offshoot; as, the filiations are from a common stock.
    • Filiation (Law) The assignment of a bastard child to some one as its father; affiliation.
    • Filiation The relationship of a son or child to a parent, esp. to a father. "The relation of paternity and filiation ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n filiation The relation of a son or daughter to a parent: the correlative of paternity.
    • n filiation The establishment of a filial relation, specifically by adoption.
    • n filiation In law, the judicial determination of the paternity of a child, especially of a bastard; affiliation.
    • n filiation Any analogous close connection or relation.
    • n filiation An individual or group of individuals derived from one source or parent.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Filiation Same as Affiliate, Affiliation.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. filiatio, fr. L. filius, son: cf. F. filiation,. See Filial

Usage

In literature:

The filiation was indeed quite traceable.
"War and the Future" by H. G. Wells
De fus' question he axed me wuz 'whut party does yo' 'filiate wif?
"Slave Narratives: Arkansas Narratives" by Work Projects Administration
On these the filiated societies model their opinions, their conduct, their passions, and attachments.
"Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson" by Thomas Jefferson
The second is the theory of their filiation.
"August Comte and Positivism" by John-Stuart Mill
Les Contes de Pomigliano et la filiation des Mythes populaires.
"Italian Popular Tales" by Thomas Frederick Crane
Our aim is only to indicate the main lines of filiation that have produced the prevailing novel of the day.
"Studies in Literature and History" by Sir Alfred Comyn Lyall
Followin' de Knights wid de Red Pants comes de 'Filiated Toilers.
"Lady Luck" by Hugh Wiley
The duration, geographical distribution, origin, and filiation of conceptions belong to historical synthesis.
"Introduction to the Study of History" by Charles V. Langlois
In Japan, as among the Basques, filiation is subordinated to the transmission of property.
"The Truth About Woman" by C. Gasquoine Hartley
Undoubtedly the tradition which, in the general filiation of English poetry, connects Tennyson with Keats, is not wholly wrong.
"A History of Nineteenth Century Literature (1780-1895)" by George Saintsbury
It ascends by uninterrupted filiation, and without any unequal alliance, to the year 1030.
"The Clan Fraser in Canada" by Alexander Fraser
There are religious filiations, just as there are historical genealogies.
"Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion based on Psychology and History" by Auguste Sabatier
In trying to subject history to the order of logic they sometimes misconceive the filiation of ideas.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 2" by Various
At their head stands Jean Lamarck, who occupies the first place next to Darwin and Goethe in the history of the Doctrine of Filiation.
"The History of Creation, Vol. I (of 2)" by Ernst Haeckel
Many events remain without any filiation.
"Voltaire" by John Morley
Why is the relation of the Son to the Father called filiation?
"The Catholic World. Volume III; Numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6." by E. Rameur
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