fascia

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n fascia instrument panel on an automobile or airplane containing dials and controls
    • n fascia a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue separating or binding together muscles and organs etc
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Fascia A band, sash, or fillet; especially, in surgery, a bandage or roller.
    • Fascia (Zoöl) A broad well-defined band of color.
    • Fascia (Arch) A flat member of an order or building, like a flat band or broad fillet; especially, one of the three bands which make up the architrave, in the Ionic order. See Illust. of Column.
    • Fascia (Anat) The layer of loose tissue, often containing fat, immediately beneath the skin; the stronger layer of connective tissue covering and investing all muscles; an aponeurosis.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n fascia In Roman antiquity, a band, sash, or fillet of various forms and uses, worn around the head, the waist, the feet and legs, etc.
    • n fascia Hence In architecture, any flat member or molding with but little projection, as the narrow horizontal bands or broad fillets into which the architraves of Ionic and Corinthian entablatures are divided (see cut under column); also, in brick buildings, the jutting of the bricks beyond the windows in the several stories except the highest.
    • n fascia In botany, an encircling or transverse band or ridge.
    • n fascia In music:
    • n fascia A tie or bind.
    • n fascia The sides of a fiddle.
    • n fascia In astronomy, a belt of the planet Jupiter. See belt, 3
    • n fascia In surgery, a bandage, roller, or ligature.
    • n fascia In anat.:
    • n fascia A sheet or layer of condensed connective tissue, forming a fibrous membrane resembling tendon or ligament, spread out in a layer, and investing, confining, supporting, and separating or uniting some muscle or any other special tissue, part, or organ of the body; also, such tissue in general; an aponeurosis (which see). The general contour of the body is invested just beneath the skin with a thin, light fascia, known as the subcutaneous or superficial fascia, as distinguished from the thicker, tougher, and more distinctly fibrous deep fascia, which invests and forms sheaths for the muscles, and dips down among the muscles and bundles of muscular fibers, forming fibrous intermuscular septa. Fasciæ being simply condensed layers of the general fibrous connective tissue of the body, there is really no abrupt demarcation or definition between any of them; and the general system of fasciæ is continuous with ligaments, tendons, sinews, periosteum, etc.
    • n fascia Some fillet-like arrangement of parts; a band: as, the fascia dentata, the dentate fascia of the brain, the serrated band of gray matter lying alongside of and beneath the fimbria.
    • n fascia In zoology, a bar, band, or belt of color on the skin or its appendages, as hair, feathers, or scales: chiefly an ornithological term applied to broad crosswise markings, as distinguished from longitudinal stripes or streaks.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Fascia fash′i-a (archit.) a flat space or band between mouldings:
    • n Fascia fash′i-a (anat.) a layer of condensed connective tissue between some muscle and any other tissue
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L., a band: cf. It. fascia,. See Fasces, and cf. Fess
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L.

Usage

In literature:

A false hip intrigues them as effectively as the soundest one of living fascia.
"In Defense of Women" by H. L. Mencken
He has in his hand the fascia herbarum, and the crepidae on his feet.
"Travels Through France and Italy" by Tobias Smollett
In the skin and fasciae, the yellow elastic is found mixed with white fibrous and areolar tissues.
"A Practical Physiology" by Albert F. Blaisdell
Smaris rostro porosissimo; fascia obscura e rostro per oculum recte ad caudam tracta; fascia altera in summo dorso.
"Discoveries in Australia, Volume 1." by J Lort Stokes
The fascia and the ulnar head of the flexor carpi ulnaris have been removed.
"Lameness of the Horse" by John Victor Lacroix
In the course of operations also, portions of skin, fascia, or bone, or even a complete joint may be transplanted, and unite by primary union.
"Manual of Surgery" by Alexis Thomson and Alexander Miles
The abdomen with three narrow interrupted fasciae.
"Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society - Vol. 3" by Various
State of tension of the muscles, fasciae, and ligaments at the moment of impact, and fixity or otherwise of the part of the body struck.
"Surgical Experiences in South Africa, 1899-1900" by George Henry Makins
Bifasciate: with two bands or fascia.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
Extravasation of urine into the sac of the superficial fascia.
"Surgical Anatomy" by Joseph Maclise
I know of no part of the body that equals the fascia as a hunting ground.
"Philosophy of Osteopathy" by Andrew T. Still
The fasciae, ligaments, and muscles of the sole of the foot are also shortened.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition." by Alexander Miles
This division may also have arisen from the fascia covering the temporal opening (Romer and Price, 1940:53).
"The Adductor Muscles of the Jaw In Some Primitive Reptiles" by Richard C. Fox
What is said of fascia?
"A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (Revised Edition)" by Calvin Cutter
Anteriorly M. submaxillaris is broadly attached by fascia to M. hyoglossus and M. geniohyoideus, which lie dorsal to M. submaxillaris.
"Neotropical Hylid Frogs, Genus Smilisca" by William E. Duellman
The fascia lata adheres strongly to its anterior border for a considerable length.
"Artistic Anatomy of Animals" by Édouard Cuyer
Suppuration may also take place beneath the fascia of the tendons.
"A System of Practical Medicine by American Authors, Vol. I" by Various
I expect my new fascia has opened your eyes to what's coming.
"Mrs. Thompson" by William Babington Maxwell
Deinde reliqua fasciae sub anquilas missa ad manus alligabis, ita ut patefacti pedes ventri eius cohaereant.
"Surgical Instruments in Greek and Roman Times" by John Stewart Milne
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In poetry:

Che stai? già il secol l'orma ultima lascia;
Dove del tempo son le leggi rotte
Precipita, portando entro la notte
Quattro tuoi lustri, e obblio freddo li fascia.
"Che Stai?" by Ugo Foscolo

In news:

Inside, wood and metal surround the driver while a Thommen aviation -grade clock sits in the upper fascia, sporting orange needle tips.
Cutting Open Transversalis Fascia and Perirenal Fascia .
Protecting the Plantar Fascia's Propulsion Power.
Bryant had missed the first two practices of the week as he continues to deal with a plantar fascia issue in his foot.
The front fascia is handsomely sculpted.
Apart from a new hexagonal lower grille opening, it bears a striking resemblance to the Escape's front fascia.
2013 Nissan 370Z Coupe has been updated with a new fascia and LED daytime running lights.
Bryant has been dealing with a plantar fascia issue in his foot for the last few weeks.
Volvo C30 was restyled last year with a new front fascia, fenders, a new honeycomb grille and trapezoidal headlights.
Chicago Bulls guard Richard Hamilton will miss an indefinite amount of time after suffering a torn plantar fascia in his left foot.
The Juke 's front fascia -- grille, headlight and bumper -- looks like a smiling kid with braces.
Only the front fascia and the separate rocker panels betray any sink marks.
Bulls' Hamilton has torn plantar fascia in left foot.
Mazda3 has a bolder stance, a new front fascia and updated five-point grille opening for both sedan and hatchback styles.
Grove Roofing , Siding & Remodeling Shingling, siding, windows, doors, fascia & soffit, seamless gutters & more.
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