extempore

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj extempore with little or no preparation or forethought "his ad-lib comments showed poor judgment","an extemporaneous piano recital","an extemporary lecture","an extempore skit","an impromptu speech","offhand excuses","trying to sound offhanded and reassuring","an off-the-cuff toast","a few unrehearsed comments"
    • adv extempore without prior preparation "he spoke extemporaneously"
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • adv Extempore Without previous study or meditation; without preparation; on the spur of the moment; suddenly; extemporaneously; as, to write or speak extempore .
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • extempore On the spur of the moment; without previous study or preparation; offhand: as, to write or speak extempore.
    • extempore Extemporary; extemporaneous.
    • extempore Synonyms See extemporaneous.
    • n extempore Language uttered or written without previous preparation.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adv Extempore eks-tem′po-re on the spur of the moment: without preparation: suddenly
    • adj Extempore sudden: rising at the moment: of a speech delivered without help of manuscript
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. ex, out + tempus, temporis, time. See Temporal

Usage

In literature:

He could not read or write, but he was wise, And knew right smart how to extemporize.
"The Book of Humorous Verse" by Various
Within a year I took my part regularly at that service, first using my manuscript, and then extemporizing as I best could.
"Life and Work in Benares and Kumaon, 1839-1877" by James Kennedy
His extempore expressions suggested an overweening view of his own position.
"The Negro and the Nation" by George S. Merriam
The natives sang to these instruments, and often made extempore verses.
"Captain Cook" by W.H.G. Kingston
And now Pastor Tappau began his prayer, extempore, as was the custom.
"Curious, if True" by Elizabeth Gaskell
Very well; I will play the Sicilian snob, but I never saw one so I shall have to do it extempore as Snug had to play the part of Lion.
"Castellinaria and Other Sicilian Diversions" by Henry Festing Jones
Not unless preparation for war is to be rejected, and reliance placed upon extemporized means.
"From Sail to Steam, Recollections of Naval Life" by Captain A. T. Mahan
The prayer was extempore, and roused the girls to amazed attention.
"Betty Vivian" by L. T. Meade
For these reasons the first rush to privateering, although feverishly energetic, was of a somewhat extemporized character.
"Sea Power in its Relations to the War of 1812" by Alfred Thayer Mahan
I have complied with the desire of certain persons who just now begged me to speak extempore.
"The Apologia and Florida of Apuleius of Madaura" by Lucius Apuleius
We see examples of it wherever we look among those whose preaching is exclusively extempore.
"Hints on Extemporaneous Preaching" by Henry Ware
Clavering tugged at the extemporized girth.
"The Cattle-Baron's Daughter" by Harold Bindloss
And in simple narrative he was as willing to use extempore language as language prepared.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 89, March, 1865" by Various
For a time the whole camp was illuminated with extemporized torches of hay.
"The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte" by William Milligan Sloane
RICCOBONI, a celebrated actor, his remarks on the Italian extempore comedy, ii.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3)" by Isaac Disraeli
During the dinner John Uzdi, captain of the scouts, entered the extemporized banquet-hall with terror in his face.
"The Golden Age in Transylvania" by Mór Jókai
The Mall was roped off, and at an extempore gate a man in uniform received the cards of admission.
"Fairfax and His Pride" by Marie Van Vorst
I prefer the pig sticking on mule-back with our extemporized spears.
"With the World's Great Travellers, Volume 2" by Various
A large store with a brick floor was the extemporized ballroom.
"The Story of a Strange Career" by Anonymous
It was not like the extemporized Sanhedrim that tried Christ, a body which kept the appearance of justice but mocked the reality.
"Historic Towns of the Western States" by Various
***

In poetry:

Then Joan brought the tea-pot, and Caleb the toast,
And the wine was frothed out by the hand of mine host;
But we clear'd our extempore banquet so fast,
That the Harrisons both were forgot in the haste.
Derry down, down, hey derry down.
"Down-Hall. A Ballad." by Matthew Prior