example

Definitions

  • Example. To cut with an ax
    Example. To cut with an ax
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n example a task performed or problem solved in order to develop skill or understanding "you must work the examples at the end of each chapter in the textbook"
    • n example an item of information that is typical of a class or group "this patient provides a typical example of the syndrome","there is an example on page 10"
    • n example something to be imitated "an exemplar of success","a model of clarity","he is the very model of a modern major general"
    • n example a representative form or pattern "I profited from his example"
    • n example punishment intended as a warning to others "they decided to make an example of him"
    • n example an occurrence of something "it was a case of bad judgment","another instance occurred yesterday","but there is always the famous example of the Smiths"
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

Example. A lie Example. A lie
Example. To ride Example. To ride
Example. I am going home Example. I am going home
A few examples of lead-glazed earthenware made in England during the 17th century. All were unearthed at Jamestown A few examples of lead-glazed earthenware made in England during the 17th century. All were unearthed at Jamestown
Examples of lead-glazed earthenware made at Jamestown about 1640-50 Examples of lead-glazed earthenware made at Jamestown about 1640-50
English slip-decorated ware. Although made in England mainly for local consumption, many attractive examples were shipped to Virginia during the 17th century English slip-decorated ware. Although made in England mainly for local consumption, many attractive examples were...
A few examples of English delftware in the Jamestown collection A few examples of English delftware in the Jamestown collection
A few examples of German salt-glazed stoneware in the Jamestown collection. All were made during the 17th century A few examples of German salt-glazed stoneware in the Jamestown collection. All were made during the 17th century

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The earliest known example of an organized market for equities dates from Rome, second century B.C
    • Example An instance serving for illustration of a rule or precept, especially a problem to be solved, or a case to be determined, as an exercise in the application of the rules of any study or branch of science; as, in trigonometry and grammar, the principles and rules are illustrated by examples .
    • Example One or a portion taken to show the character or quality of the whole; a sample; a specimen.
    • Example That which is to be avoided; one selected for punishment and to serve as a warning; a warning. "Hang him; he'll be made an example .""Now these things were our examples , to the intent that we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted."
    • Example That which is to be followed or imitated as a model; a pattern or copy. "For I have given you an example , that ye should do as I have done to you.""I gave, thou sayest, the example ; I led the way."
    • Example That which resembles or corresponds with something else; a precedent; a model. "Such temperate order in so fierce a cause
      Doth want example ."
    • v. t Example To set an example for; to give a precedent for; to exemplify; to give an instance of; to instance. "I may example my digression by some mighty precedent.""Burke devoted himself to this duty with a fervid assiduity that has not often been exampled , and has never been surpassed."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Except for 2 and 3, every prime number will eventually become divisible by 6 if you either add or subtract 1 from the number. For example, the number 17, plus 1, is divisible by 6. The number 19, minus 1, is also divisible by 6
    • n example One of a number of things, or a part of anything, generally a small quantity, exhibited or serving to show the character or quality of the whole; a representative part or instance; a sample; a specimen; an exemplar.
    • n example An instance serving for illustration; a particular case or circumstance, quotation, or other thing, illustrating a general statement, proposition, rule, or truth.
    • n example A pattern in morals or manners worthy of imitation; a model of conduct or manner; an archetype; one who or that which is proposed or is proper to be imitated.
    • n example An instance serving for a warning; a warning.
    • n example In zoology, a prepared specimen.
    • n example In mathematics, an arithmetical or algebraic problem, illustrating a rule or method, to be worked out by a student: as, an example in addition; an example in quadratics.
    • n example Synonyms Example, Pattern, Model, Precedent, Ideal, Instance; archetype, prototype; exemplification. Example is the most general of these words; it is the only one of them that admits application to that which is to be avoided. An example is something to guide the understanding, so that one may decide what to do and what not to do. Pattern and model express that which is to be closely followed or copied; they primarily refer to physical shape: as, an artist's model; but also freely to the shaping of conduct and character: as, a pattern of sobriety; a model of virtue. Perhaps model suggests the more complete example, but the difference between the two words in this respect is small. A precedent is an example set in the past, as a legal decision which may be pleaded in law as the basis of a further decision, and in private affairs a thing once done or allowed, and so pleaded as a reason or an excuse for more of the same sort: as, a precedent for indulgence. An ideal is a model of perfection, primarily imaginary, but by hyperbole sometimes real. An example is generally a representative person or thing, but the word is sometimes used instead of instance with reference to a representative act or course of conduct: as, to prove a rule by examples; to prove a man's fidelity or treachery by instances or examples.
    • example To furnish with examples; give examples of.
    • example To justify by the authority of an example.
    • example To set or make an example of; present as an example.
    • example To give an example.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Several buildings in Manhattan, NY have their own zip code. For example the former World Trade Center has several.
    • n Example egz-am′pl that which is taken as a specimen of the rest, or as an illustration of the rule, &c.: the person or thing to be imitated or avoided: a pattern: a warning: a former instance
    • v.t Example to exemplify: to instance
    • ***

Quotations

  • Source Unknown
    Source Unknown
    “A pint of example is worth a gallon of advice”
  • Aesop
    Aesop
    “Example is the best precept.”
  • Barbara De Angelis
    Barbara%20De%20Angelis
    “The greatest gift you and your partner can give your children is the example of an intimate, healthy, and loving relationship.”
  • Scottie Pippen
    Scottie Pippen
    “I've always led by example and I'm not that vocal.”
  • Albert Schweitzer
    Albert%20Schweitzer
    “Example is leadership.”
  • Albert Schweitzer
    Albert%20Schweitzer
    “Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
A later form for ensample, fr. L. exemplum, orig., what is taken out of a larger quantity, as a sample, from eximere, to take out. See Exempt, and cf. Ensample Sample

Usage

In literature:

America has set you the example, and you may follow it and be free.
"The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete" by Thomas Paine
Let us give one example among a thousand to show how indifferent these men of money become to everything but money.
"The Forerunners" by Romain Rolland
A few other examples of reflexes may be given.
"Psychology" by Robert S. Woodworth
Of course, I selected my examples.
"The Position of Woman in Primitive Society" by C. Gasquoine Hartley
An example will show the nature of this help, and what it was worth.
"Logic, Inductive and Deductive" by William Minto
The crude examples teach nothing as to stage of culture.
"Ancient Pottery of the Mississippi Valley" by William H. Holmes
No country has preserved finer or more numerous examples of Romanesque architecture than Germany.
"The Cathedrals and Churches of the Rhine" by Francis Miltoun
In this grand example the pseudo-bulbs are more than 2 feet high, proportionately thick.
"The Woodlands Orchids" by Frederick Boyle
This is a good example of wash drawing for process; that is to say, a good example from the "process man's" point of view.
"The Art of Illustration" by Henry Blackburn
In foreign policy Bulgaria under Chervenkov continued to follow the Soviet example.
"Area Handbook for Bulgaria" by Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole
Take the pruning knife for example.
"Trees and Shrubs for English Gardens" by Ernest Thomas Cook
The spirit of the Americans may be an useful example to us.
"Junius Unmasked" by Joel Moody
In order to illustrate this argument, I shall select the Pyrenees as an example.
"Principles of Geology" by Charles Lyell
A few examples, less generally known, may be given to prove that the beliefs of folklore are not peculiar to any one race or stock of men.
"Custom and Myth" by Andrew Lang
What is the example of a miner.
"Geography and Plays" by Gertrude Stein
Let us consider some examples of this.
"A Critical History of Greek Philosophy" by W. T. Stace
Let the Blessed Virgin Mary be our example.
"Mary, Help of Christians" by Various
But most growths of subterranean origin which pass for roots are forms of stems, the common Potato for example.
"The Elements of Botany" by Asa Gray
For one or two examples I appeal to chemistry.
"The Religion of Geology and Its Connected Sciences" by Edward Hitchcock
Let us take, then, as our example, one of what are termed the sensible qualities of objects, and let that example be whiteness.
"A System of Logic: Ratiocinative and Inductive" by John Stuart Mill
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In poetry:

Hail to the beings,
Unknown and glorious,
Whom we forebode!
From his example
Learn we to know them!
"The Godlike" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Shall we from scenes of trial shrink,
Now our Example lives?
Or shall we all with patience drink
The cup our Father gives?
"Hymns for Communion III" by John Pierpont
"Neither by beauty nor belief
Nor white example shown.
Something a wanton—more a thief—
But—most of all—mine own."
"Dinah in Heaven" by Rudyard Kipling
Alas! one bad example shown;
How quickly all the sex pursue!
See, madam, see the arts o'erthrown,
Between John Overton and you!
"On the Countess of Burlington Cutting Paper" by Alexander Pope
The moral of this quaint example
Is do just the best that you can,
Be proud of yourself but remember,
There's no indispensable man.
"There Is No Indispensable Man" by Anonymous British
Yea, from the hours that heard his speech
High shining mem’ries give
That fine example which will teach
Our children how to live.
"Robert Parkes" by Henry Kendall

In news:

Take Spasso, a West Village newcomer, for example.
Then he used his own example.
We've had examples of prison literature throughout history, but The Ghost Writer may be the closest we've ever had to prison filmmaking.
The most recent example is in Milwaukee.
Take, for example, the Folsom Symphony.
This is a prime example of what the Cockfight stands for.
The supreme example in my experience is served at Vong, the New York restaurant where Jean-Georges Vongerichten works his Gallic culinary magic on exotic Thai specialties.
Martell, for example, prefers the more aromatic Troncais oak.
Here's an example of what Bun B created for kids to color.
Take Heidelberg and Xerox, for example.
Legos, for example, will never go out of style.
She's setting the example for all, using her gifts accordingly.
76ers center Andrew Bynum, who injured his knee while bowling, is only the most recent example of athletes hurting themselves in less-than-glorious ways.
Here are a few examples.
There are many examples of doctors already taking steps in this direction.
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In science:

One example is the instanton liquid vacuum , which is a model for an ensemble of relevant gauge field configurations. Effective low-energy theories are a second example.
Random Matrix Theory and Chiral Symmetry in QCD
Example: [w ] = D4(a1) To illustrate the developed technique we consider the example served as the motivation of the present work.
Solutions to WDVV from generalized Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies
The first example is treated in detail and results for the other examples are sketched.
Random matrix theory over finite fields: a survey
Example 2: Proportions of semisimple elements in exceptional groups Although Example 5 of Section 2.2 was estimating proportions of semisimple matrices, this was only for the finite classical groups, where the index n can take an infinite number of values.
Random matrix theory over finite fields: a survey
Polycyclic examples are given in [BG]; similar ideas can be used to produce nonpolycyclic examples.
Problems on the geometry of finitely generated solvable groups
This would exclude the examples of a large internal approximate three-sphere and also the long internal throat, since these examples would be expected to collapse gravitationally to singularities.
Defining Entropy Bounds
While there are several examples of a flat IMF for stars less massive than 1 M⊙ (see Larson 1999), this is the first example of a flattening above this point.
The Formation of Star Clusters
The meaning of many common notions and constructions depends on whether they are considered over C or over R. (The rationality of a real surface is a good example.) The conj-equivariant category is usually designated with the word ‘real’; for example, a real curve on a real surface is a conj-invariant analytic curve.
Real Rational Surfaces Are Quasi-Simple
One direction of the inequalities are simple corollaries to Theorem 1; the other direction is provided by the “fast graphs” of Example 17 (expected value) and Example 18 (large deviations).
Fast graphs for the random walker
Example 18 We now show that in the previous example the large deviation bounds of Proposition (16) are also achieved.
Fast graphs for the random walker
Also notice that reversed implications are not true, see for instance Example 5.3 (according to this is an example of a mixed TOAt graph).
Classification on the average of random walks
Our examples involve rotational motion, but now it should be possible to generate other forms of collectivity, as seen by the simplest example: with the same two body interaction the (sd)4 spectrum is rotational (20Ne) and the (sd)−4 spectrum is vibrational (36Ar).
Spectroscopy with random and displaced random ensembles
This example concerns a single higher order equation but presumably similar examples can be constructed for systems of first order equations.
Applications of the theory of evolution equations to general relativity
The ring R is a noetherian regular commutative k-algebra of infinite Krull dimension obtained by localizing a polynomial ring of countably many variables, which is essentially the example of Nagata [Na, Example 1, p.203].
Dualizing Complexes and Tilting Complexes over Simple Rings
We develop techniques of construction, obtaining new examples in this class in the case of von Neumann regular rings, and we compute the Grothendieck groups of these examples.
$K_0$ of purely infinite simple regular rings
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