escallop

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v escallop bake in a sauce, milk, etc., often with breadcrumbs on top
    • n escallop edible marine bivalve having a fluted fan-shaped shell that swim by expelling water from the shell in a series of snapping motions
    • n escallop thin slice of meat (especially veal) usually fried or broiled
    • n escallop edible muscle of mollusks having fan-shaped shells; served broiled or poached or in salads or cream sauces
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Escallop See Escalop.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • escallop Same as scallop.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Escallop es-kal′up a variant of scallop
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Usage

In literature:

Stewed tomatoes are a nice accompaniment for escalloped vegetable oysters.
"Science in the Kitchen." by Mrs. E. E. Kellogg
Nine miles south of Boston, just a little back from the escalloped shores of Old Ocean, lies the village of Braintree.
"Little Journeys To the Homes of the Great, Volume 3 (of 14)" by Elbert Hubbard
Asparagus escalloped with toast crumbs and butter was for the moment symbol of all humanity's will to keep alive.
"Christmas" by Zona Gale
Escalloped corn in ramikins.
"Games For All Occasions" by Mary E. Blain
Dried peaches, stewed, broiled honeycomb tripe, escalloped potatoes, reheated rolls.
"American Cookery" by Various
St. James the Greater has the escallop shell and staff of the pilgrim.
"The Worship of the Church" by Jacob A. Regester
Prepare it exactly as for escalloped cauliflower and finish in the same way.
"The Golden Age Cook Book" by Henrietta Latham Dwight
Crenate, notched, indented or escalloped at the edge.
"The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise" by M. E. Hard
Gardens are sometimes bordered with escallop shells, which are neat enough but seem rather out of place among flowers.
"What Shall We Do Now?: Five Hundred Games and Pastimes" by Dorothy Canfield Fisher
Per pale sable and or, a cheveron between three escallop shells, all counterchanged.
"Notes and Queries, Number 235, April 29, 1854" by Various
The escallops of the field of the Spencer arms probably find their origin in the fossil escallops of the Wormleighton stone.
"Edge Hill" by Edwin Walford
Serve with turkey, chicken, mutton or game and with escalloped oysters.
"Civic League Cook Book" by Anonymous
Baked or escalloped potatoes.
"Dietetics for Nurses" by Fairfax T. Proudfit
Use white sauce very sparingly with some escalloped vegetable for variety.
"Foods and Household Management" by Helen Kinne
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