encyclopaedist

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n encyclopaedist a person who compiles information for encyclopedias
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Encyclopaedist the compiler, or one who assists in the compilation, of an encyclopædia: esp. a writer for the French Encyclopédie (1751-65)
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Formed from Gr. engkyklopaideiaengkyklios, circular, paideia, instruction.

Usage

In literature:

The poor lad's head was full of this encyclopaedist trash.
"Scaramouche" by Rafael Sabatini
These men became known as the Encyclopaedists, and their history is fully set forth by Condillac.
"The Interdependence of Literature" by Georgina Pell Curtis
The optimism of the Encyclopaedists was really based on an intense consciousness of the enlightenment of their own age.
"The Idea of Progress" by J. B. Bury
For in his occupation with the Encyclopaedists he had cared little for poetry.
"The History of David Grieve" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
Language like this was much in vogue among the French encyclopaedists of the last century.
"Old-Fashioned Ethics and Common-Sense Metaphysics" by William Thomas Thornton
Some were common to all the group; others lie in germ at least in the writings of the Encyclopaedists.
"Shelley, Godwin and Their Circle" by H. N. Brailsford
Here he became familiar with the works of the Encyclopaedists, and adopted the theories of Rousseau.
"Library of the World's Best literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 12" by Various
The philosophical movement of the Encyclopaedists and Economists was not encouraged at all.
"Women of Modern France (Illustrated)" by Hugo Paul Thieme (1870-1940)
But the greatest of the Encyclopaedists in this respect was unquestionably Diderot.
"A Short History of French Literature" by George Saintsbury
Anyhow, the English appointment was withheld, and the worn-out encyclopaedist succumbed to disease and vexation combined.
"History of Modern Philosophy" by Alfred William Benn
Rich and generous he was the patron of the Encyclopaedists.
"A Biographical Dictionary of Freethinkers of All Ages and Nations" by Joseph Mazzini Wheeler
In the seventeenth century, however, the Spanish court fell under the influence of the French encyclopaedists.
"Spain" by Wentworth Webster
The Encyclopaedist is a most interesting and representative person.
"Boon, The Mind of the Race, The Wild Asses of the Devil, and The Last Trump;" by Herbert George Wells
Diderot (1713-1784) was born to be an encyclopaedist, and a captain of encyclopaedists.
"French Classics" by William Cleaver Wilkinson
The deism of the Encyclopaedists and Voltaire came into vogue.
"The Memoirs of Count Carlo Gozzi; Volume the first" by Count Carlo Gozzi
As an opponent of the Encyclopaedists and a panegyrist of Louis XV., he received considerable pensions.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 1" by Various
The Encyclopaedists of France did more for liberty than all the writers upon theology.
"The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Vol. 5 (of 12) Dresden Edition--Discussions" by Robert G. Ingersoll
The "Encyclopaedists," the most brilliant men and women of the generation, were planning their work of demolition.
"Transcendentalism in New England" by Octavius Brooks Frothingham
Holbach exposed the logical consequences of the theories of the Encyclopaedists.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 13, Slice 5" by Various
In general he regarded music from the attitude of our Encyclopaedists at the time of Rameau.
"Handel" by Romain Rolland
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