enamel

Definitions

  • ENAMEL OR MUFFLE KILN
    ENAMEL OR MUFFLE KILN
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v enamel coat, inlay, or surface with enamel
    • n enamel any smooth glossy coating that resembles ceramic glaze
    • n enamel a paint that dries to a hard glossy finish
    • n enamel hard white substance covering the crown of a tooth
    • n enamel a colored glassy compound (opaque or partially opaque) that is fused to the surface of metal or glass or pottery for decoration or protection
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Enamel is hardest substance in the human body
    • Enamel A cosmetic intended to give the appearance of a smooth and beautiful complexion.
    • Enamel (Min) A glassy, opaque bead obtained by the blowpipe.
    • Enamel A variety of glass, used in ornament, to cover a surface, as of metal or pottery, and admitting of after decoration in color, or used itself for inlaying or application in varied colors.
    • Enamel Any one of various preparations for giving a smooth, glossy surface like that of enamel.
    • a Enamel Relating to the art of enameling; as, enamel painting.
    • Enamel That which is enameled; also, any smooth, glossy surface, resembling enamel, especially if variegated.
    • Enamel (Anat) The intensely hard calcified tissue entering into the composition of teeth. It merely covers the exposed parts of the teeth of man, but in many animals is intermixed in various ways with the dentine and cement.
    • Enamel To disguise with cosmetics, as a woman's complexion.
    • Enamel To form a glossy surface like enamel upon; as, to enamel card paper; to enamel leather or cloth.
    • Enamel To lay enamel upon; to decorate with enamel whether inlaid or painted.
    • v. i Enamel To practice the art of enameling.
    • Enamel To variegate with colors as if with enamel. "Oft he [the serpent]bowed
      His turret crest and sleek enameled neck."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n enamel In ceramics, a vitrified substance, either transparent or opaque, applied as a coating to pottery and porcelain of many kinds. It is simply a fusible kind of glass, and when transparent is commonly called glaze. A vitreous coating of similar character is applied to a class of iron utensils for cooking, etc., and is made to serve other useful purposes.
    • n enamel In the fine arts, a vitreous substance or glass, opaque or transparent, and variously colored, applied as a coating on a surface of metal or of porcelain (see def. 1) for purposes of decoration. It consists of easily fusible salts, such as the silicates and borates of sodium, potassium, lead, etc., to which various earths and metallic oxids are added to give the desired colors. These enamels are now prepared in the form of sticks, like sealing-wax, and for use are pulverized, and applied to the surface either dry or moistened so as to form a paste. The object to be enameled is then exposed to a moderate temperature in a muffle, and the vitreous substance becomes sufficiently fluid to form a brilliant and adhesive coating. Enamels in modern times include an infinite number of tints; but those of the ancient Orientals and of the Byzantine empire present but few colors, and those distinctly contrasting. See def. 3, and Limoges enamel, below.
    • n enamel Enamel-work: a piece or sort of work whose chief decorative quality lies iu the enamel itself: as, a fine piece of cloisonné enamel; a specimen of enamel à jour. Of this work there are three distinct classes: cloisonné enamel, in which partitions surrounding the compartments of enamel of each different color are formed of wire of rectangular section secured to the body or foundation; champlevé enamel, in which the surface of the background is engraved or hollowed out to receive the enamel; surface-enamel, in which the whole surface of a plate of metal is covered with the enamel, which when fused affords a smooth ground for painting. A familiar instance of the last kind of enamelwork is the dial of a common watch, which is enameled on copper in white, the figures being painted upon it in black enamel. Champlevé enamel is most used for jewelry and similar decorative work.
    • n enamel Any smooth, glossy surface resembling enamel, but produced by means of varnish or lacquer, or in some other way not involving vitrification: as, the enamel of enameled leather, paper, slate, etc.
    • n enamel In anatomy, the hardest part of a tooth; the very dense, smooth, glistening substance which crowns a tooth or coats a part of its surface: distinguished from dentin and from cement. It is always superficial, and represents a special modification of epithelial substance. It is usually white, sometimes red, as in the front teeth of most rodents, or reddish-black, as in the teeth of most shrews. See cut under tooth.
    • n enamel Figuratively, gloss; polish.
    • n enamel In cosmetics, a coating applied to the skin, giving the appearance of a beautiful complexion.
    • enamel To lay enamel upon; cover or decorate with enamel.
    • enamel To form a glossy surface like enamel upon: as, to enamel cardboard; specifically, to use an enamel upon the skin.
    • enamel To variegate or adorn with different colors.
    • enamel To practise the use of enamel or the art of enameling.
    • n enamel The firm white substance which covers the bony scales of some ganoid fishes.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Enamel en-am′el the name given to vitrified substances applied chiefly to the surface of metals: any smooth hard coating, esp. that of the teeth: anything enamelled
    • v.t Enamel to coat with or paint in enamel: to form a glossy surface upon, like enamel:—pr.p. enam′elling; pa.p. enam′elled
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Pref. en-, + amel,. See Amel Smelt (v. t.)

Usage

In literature:

When I return, they will be full of light and life, but the fields will not be so enchantingly fresh, nor so enamelled with flowers.
"At Home And Abroad" by Margaret Fuller Ossoli
The leg came off and I dropped it into the white enamelled pail.
"Combed Out" by Fritz August Voigt
The black enamel soon chips off, which gives them a worn-out appearance.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 561, October 2, 1886" by Various
It is of silver gilt, and ornamented in paste with enamel.
"Notes and Queries, Issue No. 61, December 28, 1850" by Various
You're sure the enamel is perfectly dry on that bed?
"The Witness" by Grace Livingston Hill Lutz
It was a glorious thing of deep blue glass and translucent enamel and silver, with the Berovieri signature cut on it.
"The Lee Shore" by Rose Macaulay
Far better is the enameled paint, requiring three coats, or painted burlap.
"The Complete Home" by Various
Years and etiquette combined have led her Majesty to the thraldom of the rouge and enamel pot.
"The Onlooker, Volume 1, Part 2" by Various
Old bindings may be seen too, among them a lavish Byzantine example with enamels and mosaics.
"A Wanderer in Venice" by E.V. Lucas
She fills a tiny brush with glittering, black enamel and begins to apply it in dots and lines.
"Greenwich Village" by Anna Alice Chapin
Sacred emblems enamelled on it,' said Merton, gingerly examining the jewel.
"The Disentanglers" by Andrew Lang
The same is true of the porcelain-like enamel with which our kitchen iron ware is nowadays coated.
"Creative Chemistry" by Edwin E. Slosson
Crude brick, burnt brick, enamelled brick, but always and everywhere brick was the principal element in their construction.
"History Of Egypt, Chaldæa, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 3 (of 12)" by G. Maspero
We will begin with the white or light-tinted enamel.
"French Polishing and Enamelling" by Richard Bitmead
But, howsumever, the Russians did well; their enamel in this exhibit is the best shown anywhere.
"Samantha at the World's Fair" by Marietta Holley
Francia was a very skilful workman in niello, and in enamels.
"Arts and Crafts in the Middle Ages" by Julia De Wolf Addison
Before you go, may I have the pleasure of a nearer look at that beautiful enamel brooch of yours?
"The Second Latchkey" by Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson
Upon her breast was her silver butterfly and the enameled chains were about her throat.
"The Silver Butterfly" by Mrs. Wilson Woodrow
The ring is of gold enamelled, the skeletons being made still more hideous by a covering of white enamel.
"Rambles of an Archaeologist Among Old Books and in Old Places" by Frederick William Fairholt
Its supports were of silver gilt, beautifully chased, and profusely set with enamelled and jewelled medallions.
"The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde
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In poetry:

By old Cephisus deep,
Who spread his wavy sweep
In warbled wand'rings round thy green retreat;
On whose enamell'd side,
When holy Freedom died,
No equal haunt allur'd thy future feet.
"Ode to Simplicity" by William Taylor Collins
Why mourns my friend? why weeps his downcast eye,
That eye where mirth, where fancy, used to shine?
Thy cheerful meads reprove that swelling sigh;
Spring ne'er enamell'd fairer meads than thine.
"Elegy XXVI. Describing the Sorrow of An Ingeneous Mind" by William Shenstone
Ye wild blooming flow'rs, that enamel this brink,
Like me could ye feel, and like me could ye think,
How sadly would droop ev'ry beautiful leaf!
How soon would your sweetness be wasted with grief!
"The Song Of Grief" by Sir John Carr
The rose, that o'er the Cyprian plains,
With flowers enamell'd, blooming reigns,
With undisputed power,
Placed near her cheek's celestial red
(Its purple lost, its lustre fled),
Delights the sense no more.
"Comparison" by William Shenstone
When Morn's bright torch illum'd the sky,
Vainly thy flaunting buds display'd
Enamell'd leaves of crimson die,
Ill-fated blossoms doom'd to fade; So 'tis with BEAUTY, hapless flow'r, Its lustre blooms but for an hour.
"Stanzas to the Rose" by Mary Darby Robinson
It will not bat an eye if you heap gold
And jewels on it-this shyest of fays
In blue enamel and tinfoil enfolded
Creeps in your heart of hearts—and there it stays.
Ah, how I love it all in these first days,
All golden finery and silver shades!
"A Walts With a Tear in It" by Boris Pasternak

In news:

Revision of D7786 - 12 Standard Test Method for Determining Enamel Holdout .
This work item is being initiated to start an Interlaboratorty Study (ILS) for the newly published test Method for Enamel Holdout .
The items include lamps , windows, vases, paintings, enamels and mosaics that were previously part of Japan's Garden Museum Collection.
Portable pieces of art' is what Earl Pardon called his work Pardon was among the best of the modernists , using enamel the way a painter uses paint, his pieces heavily influenced by African art.
Theo modernists have been called 'sculptors in small scale', 'painters in enamel', architects in miniature.
This distinctive enamel-on-aluminum work by artist Denice Bizot is both — $95 at Cameron Jones for Your Home (2117 Magazine St, 524-3119).
8 cooking programs, retractable controls, ventilated steam outlet, easy to clean enamel 208V-240V.
Maytag's latest range line, for example, features AquaLift, a self-clean technology that utilizes low heat and water to activate an enamel coating on the oven interior and thus release baked-on spills in less than an hour.
The porcelain enameling industry will meet for the 72nd Porcelain Enamel Institute Technical Forum, scheduled for May 11-13 at the downtown Doubletree Hotel in Nashville, TN.
I've got them salted down in an enamel pot in the kitchen, and I thought I'd share the pickle recipe I used.
WHAT SHE WORE Freida Pinto wowed in a one-of-a-kind Ralph Lauren Collection gown and enamel Salvatore Ferragamo minaudiere at the Dubai International Film Festival screening of Life of Pi.
Collaborative Efforts in New Technology Development of Reactive Porcelain Enamels for Reinforcing Steel in Concrete.
It offers full strength even to uncut enamel.
Their sleek glass and porcelain rods long gone, enameled, ceramic, and metal towel-bar supports often turn up at flea markets.
"No Title Required ," 2006 Enamel on wood 10 panels, overall dimensions: 55 x 688 inches.
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In science:

This Faraday glass is housed in a Teflon mount wound around with 2500 turns of 0.2 mm enamel-insulated wire.
Building a 3.5 m prototype interferometer for the Q & A vacuum birefringence experiment and high precision ellipsometry
Enamel volume steadily decreases as an animal consumes resources.
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
Teaford and Oyen also showed that the enamel thickness decreased by ca. 0.58 µm day−1 when vervets fed on the raw diet, versus ca. 0.24 µm day−1 when they fed on the pre-mashed diet.
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
The basal loss of enamel thickness has an expected value E(Ω) = ¯ω = 0.24 µm.
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
Mangel 2000), and assume that at the end of this interval, the fitness of an individual with energy reserves x and enamel volume v is Φ(x, v).
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
C values of carbonate, the mineral component of bone and tooth enamel.
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
USOs is influenced by both energetic reserves and enamel volume.
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
If foraging costs are too great, low risk, fracture resistant foods are preferred despite greater enamel wear, resulting in a higher δ 13Cavg ≈ −8.8(cid:104) (fig. 5C).
Stable isotopes, functional morphology, and human evolution: a model of consilience
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