emission

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n emission the act of emitting; causing to flow forth
    • n emission the occurrence of a flow of water (as from a pipe)
    • n emission any of several bodily processes by which substances go out of the body "the discharge of pus"
    • n emission the release of electrons from parent atoms
    • n emission a substance that is emitted or released
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The word "laser" stands for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission by radiation."
    • Emission That which is sent out, issued, or put in circulation at one time; issue; as, the emission was mostly blood.
    • Emission The act of sending or throwing out; the act of sending forth or putting into circulation; issue; as, the emission of light from the sun; the emission of heat from a fire; the emission of bank notes.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Laser stands for "light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation." Developed 1950s 1960s.
    • n emission The act of emitting, or of sending or throwing out; a putting forth or issuing: as, the emission of light from the sun or other luminous body; the emission of steam from a boiler; the emission of paper money.
    • n emission That which is emitted, or sent or thrown out.
    • n emission Specifically— In finance, an amount or quantity of any representative of value issued or put into circulation; an issue: as, the entire emission (of coin, bank-notes, or the like) has been called in or redeemed; the first, second and third emissions of United States notes issued during the civil war.
    • n emission In physiology, a discharge, especially an involuntary discharge, of semen.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Emission the act of emitting: that which is issued at one time
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. emissio,: cf. F. émission,. See Emit
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. emittĕre, emissume, out of, mittĕre, to send.

Usage

In literature:

As the glow augments the red becomes more brilliant, but at the same time orange rays are added to the emission.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
So that the emission theory harmonizes with the wave theory in regard to reflection.
"Aether and Gravitation" by William George Hooper
These emissions are likely to occur once in two to four weeks and take the place of the nocturnal emission.
"The Biology, Physiology and Sociology of Reproduction" by Winfield S. Hall
These night emissions, therefore, are perfectly natural losses, and need cause absolutely no distress of mind whatever.
"The Eugenic Marriage, Vol 2 (of 4)" by W. Grant Hague
Applied to mortar or bomb vessels, from the great emission of flame to throw a 13-inch shell.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
Mr. Scrope observed that the lava flowed at the rate of about three feet an hour nine months after its emission.
"Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror" by Richard Linthicum
To illustrate the distinction in question, let us take two familiar cases of the emission of light.
"Myths and Marvels of Astronomy" by Richard A. Proctor
Instead of a mumbled, monotonous, machine-like emission of sound they have real speech, vivacious, varied, musical.
"Appearances" by Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson
The acts of exhibition were never accompanied with seminal emission, although he sometimes had such emissions during the night.
"The Sexual Life of the Child" by Albert Moll
The emission of odors and acute sensibility to them is the only presumable agency at work in those instances.
"Man And His Ancestor" by Charles Morris
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In news:

The White House has completed its review of controversial US EPA regulations aimed at curbing renewable fuels' greenhouse gas emissions.
EPA announces changes on indirect land-use emissions in its new biofuels rules, staving off pressure from ag legislators.
EPA Revises Indirect Land-Use Emissions Stance.
Long term global growth in CO2 emissions continues to be driven by power generation and road transport, both in industrial and developing countries.
BRUSSELS, Belgium — The European Union (EU) has banned the most inefficient washing machines in a plan to save the equivalent of two power plants worth of electricity and cut 3.8 million tons in carbon-dioxide emissions annually by 2020.
'Living' buildings could inhale city carbon emissions.
Virtual Instrumentation Monitors Arkansas Emissions.
Emissions from Valero refinery part of repair.
The Valero refinery has been experiencing intermittent visible emissions of what looks like dark gray smoke from its main stacks since Thursday, a spokesman for Valero said.
Plan places cap on emissions from individual polluters.
The images indicate that the emission line extends some 3 solar radii above the Sun's surface.
Rather than a call to throw up one's hands in discouragement, the results show the importance of acting quickly to reduce emissions and so limit the very long-lived effects.
Earthship movement struggles in NM, may not keep pace with fight to reduce carbon emissions.
Cast your vote now and listen for the winner tonight during Nocturnal Emissions.
At the 1-year follow-up, findings on fiberoptic endoscopy of the larynx were normal, and positron-emission tomography found no evidence of a recurrence.
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In science:

Sν ≡ jν /αν is the source function, αν and jν being the extinction (true absorption + scattering) and emission (true emission + scattering) coefficients. A medium is said optical ly thin or thick if τν along a typical path trough the medium is << 1 or >> 1.
High-Redshift Galaxies: The Far-Infrared and Sub-Millimeter View
This implies that dust emission spectra in a variety of galactic environments (from quiescent to actively starbursting galaxies and AGNs) are quite stable and robust, with peak emission mostly confined to the wavelength interval λpeak ≃ 100 to 30 µm.
High-Redshift Galaxies: The Far-Infrared and Sub-Millimeter View
In this model, the optical-NIR spectrum of the galaxy is contributed mostly by old stellar populations unrelated to the ongoing starburst, whereas the starburst emission is mostly observable at λ > 4 µm in the form of dust re-radiation, radio SN and free-free emissions.
High-Redshift Galaxies: The Far-Infrared and Sub-Millimeter View
The curves at 1.25 µm and 2.2 µm follow each other and track the emission from the photosphere while the 12 µm emission is mainly produced by circumstellar dust.
The Very Slow Wind From the Pulsating Semiregular Red Giant L2 Pup
In the CB model, the X-ray emission by a GRB is more complex than its optical emission.
Optical and X-ray Afterglows in the Cannonball Model of GRBs
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