emigrant

Definitions

  • Brass weights and a piece of scrap brass unearthed at Jamestown. Records indicate that many metalworkers emigrated to Virginia during the 17th century
    Brass weights and a piece of scrap brass unearthed at Jamestown. Records indicate that many metalworkers emigrated to Virginia during the 17th century
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n emigrant someone who leaves one country to settle in another
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Emigrant Pertaining to an emigrant; used for emigrants; as, an emigrant ship or hospital.
    • Emigrant Removing from one country to another; emigrating; as, an emigrant company or nation.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • emigrant Moving from one place or country to another for the purpose of settling there: as, an emigrant family: used with reference to the country from which the movement takes place. See immigrant.
    • emigrant Pertaining to emigration or emigrants: as, an emigrant ship.
    • n emigrant One who removes his habitation from one place to another for settlement; specifically, one who quits one country or region to settle in another.
    • n emigrant In biology, one of a generation of parthenogenetic insects which migrate from the plant upon which they were born to a plant of another kind upon which they multiply.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Emigrant emigrating or having emigrated
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Quotations

  • Helen Hunt Jackson
    Helen Hunt Jackson
    “Oh, write of me, not Died in bitter pains, but Emigrated to another star!”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. emigrans, -antis, p. pr. of emigrare, to emigrate: cf. F. émigrant,. See Emigrate (v. i.)
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. emigrāre, -ātume, from, migrāre, to remove.

Usage

In literature:

The country gentlemen of La Vendee had either not emigrated, or had returned to their homes, after seeing what the emigration came to.
"Lectures on the French Revolution" by John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton
But there's a new Emigration Jane among the housemaids.
"The Dop Doctor" by Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
Severe laws were passed against the emigrants.
"Louis Philippe" by John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott
The sons of the Quakers emigrated.
"Quaker Hill" by Warren H. Wilson
I'm going to sell out and emigrate.
"One Way Out" by William Carleton
It contains about twelve hundred inhabitants, chiefly emigrants from New England.
"Travels in North America, From Modern Writers" by William Bingley
What is the relation of village and city emigration and immigration to isolation?
"Introduction to the Science of Sociology" by Robert E. Park
As the spring odors filled my nostrils, my wish to emigrate was like that of the birds.
"A Son of the Middle Border" by Hamlin Garland
Nothing of the sort; Aucklanders are too well used to the arrival of emigrant ships.
"Brighter Britain! (Volume 1 of 2)" by William Delisle Hay
The emigrants decided to go into Kansas by way of Parkville.
"The Boy Settlers" by Noah Brooks
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In poetry:

Far away, far away,
The emigrant ship must sail to-day:
Cruel ship,— to look so gay
Bearing the exiles far away.
"The Emigrant Ship" by Martin Farquhar Tupper
And live in that dear Norway still,
And let the emigrant crowd sail West
Without you? Well, you have had your will.
Why would you fly from your sheltering nest?
"Karen" by Celia Laighton Thaxter
You have the kindly sympathetic heart
Of her who loved the common people well,
The noble lady who with witching art
Taught us to sing the "Emigrant's Farewell.'
"Farewell To Lord And Lady Dufferin" by Nora Pembroke
He found us, Rosie, Mickie, an' meself,
Just landed in the emigration shed;
Meself was tyin' on their bits of clothes;
Their mother—rest her tender sowl!—was dead.
"A Hungry Day" by Isabella Valancy Crawford
On the river's brink the emigrant's child
Passed all his lonely hours,
He laughed when he ruffled the bosom mild
Of the flowing streamlet so bright and wild,
As it bore his boon of flowers.
"The Forest River." by Harriet Annie Wilkins

In news:

The world has only really known one Nabokov : Vladimir, the Russian emigre who wrote Lolita, Pale Fire, and Pnin, to name just a few works from a prolific career.
"Chef Waka" emigrated to the US from Japan in 1989.
His parents emigrated from the Philippines to Houston in the '50s, and his mom, a nurse, soon learned to mangle American dishes as thoroughly as she wrecked those of the Southeast Asian islands.
2 Emigres, Father and Son; Pugnacious Manager and Shy, Brilliant Player.
Liv Ullmann is a Golden Globe-winning actress (Best Actress for "The Emigrants" in 1971) who has been nominated twice for an Oscar.
A native of Russia, Rabbi Kotler emigrated to Palestine in 1940.
Since emigrating in 1973, he has lived in France, and recently started, with his wife, the magazine Syntaxis.
Hussain Aldiwan, left, and Najem Alekabi, Iraqi emigres who suffered under the Hussein regime were photographed at Aldiwan's El Cajon home.
Iran draws many Afghan emigrants in search of work, and is home to more than 1.5 million Afghan refugees.
Russian emigre taking on broader role at office products giant, is likely successor to chairman and CEO.
Shane McNamee (left) is one of many young GAA players to have emigrated to the United States.
After emigrating from the United Kingdom in 1985, Buckman took an appointment in the medical oncology department at Sunnybrook Hospital.
A Federal judge yesterday restored the American citizenship of Rabbi Meir Kahane, the Brooklyn-born founder of the Jewish Defense League who emigrated to Israel more than 15 years ago.
In 1850 Oscar Roos, Carl Fernström and August Sandahl emigrated from Västergötland and built a cabin by Hay Lake.
GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Upon emigrating to the United States in 1948, Neal Mast never envisioned he would continue the greenhouse business his family had maintained in the Netherlands.
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In science:

In Biology, Eq. (6) may model the changes in the population of a species in some geographically-limited region, assuming that it has an effective growth rate Γ and is sub jected to recurrent immigration and punctual massive emigrations: e.g., the case of many birds, swallows or flamingos among others.
Monotonous continuous-time random walks with drift and stochastic reset events
The choices in (2.2) correspond to geographic spaces that are needed, respectively, for finite approximations of the hierarchical group, for the hierarchical group, for a single-colony with immigration-emigration, and for the McKean-Vlasov limit.
Renormalisation of hierarchically interacting Cannings processes
Furthermore, we define the Λ-coalescent with immigration-emigration as the spatial Λ-coalescent with geographic space G = {0, ∗} and migration kernel a(0, ∗) = c, a(∗, 0) = 0.
Renormalisation of hierarchically interacting Cannings processes
R) the same notation we used for the McKean-Vlasov process with immigration-emigration on P (E ).
Renormalisation of hierarchically interacting Cannings processes
Z and (cid:101)Z agree. where the right-hand side is the McKean-Vlasov process with Fleming-Viot part at rate d1 , Cannings part Λ1 , and immigration-emigration at rate c1 from the random source Z (s).
Renormalisation of hierarchically interacting Cannings processes
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