efface

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v efface remove completely from recognition or memory "efface the memory of the time in the camps"
    • v efface remove by or as if by rubbing or erasing "Please erase the formula on the blackboard--it is wrong!"
    • v efface make inconspicuous "efface oneself"
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Efface To cause to disappear (as anything impresses or inscribed upon a surface) by rubbing out, striking out, etc.; to erase; to render illegible or indiscernible; as, to efface the letters on a monument, or the inscription on a coin.
    • Efface To destroy, as a mental impression; to wear away. "Efface from his mind the theories and notions vulgarly received."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • efface To erase or obliterate, as something inscribed or cut on a surface; destroy or render illegible; hence, to remove or destroy as if by erasing: as, to efface the letters on a monument; to efface a writing; to efface a false impression from a person's mind.
    • efface To keep out of view or unobserved; make inconspicuous; cause to be unnoticed or not noticeable: used reflexively: as, to efface one's self in the midst of gaiety.
    • efface Synonyms Deface, Erase, Cancel, Expunge, Efface, Obliterate. To deface is to injure, impair, or mar to the eye, and so generally upon the surface: as, to deface a building. The other words agree in representing a blotting out or removal. To erase is to rub out or scratch out, so that the thing is destroyed, although the signs of it may remain: as, to erase a word in a letter. To cancel is to cross out, to deprive of force or validity. To expunge is to strike out; the word is now rarely used, except of the striking out of some record: as, to expunge from the journal a resolution of censure. To efface is to make a complete removal: as, his kindness effaced all memory of past neglect. Obliterate is more emphatic than efface, meaning to remove all sign or trace of.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Efface ef-fās′ to destroy the surface of a thing: to rub out: to obliterate, wear away
    • ***

Quotations

  • Germaine De Stael
    Germaine De Stael
    “Love is the emblem of eternity; it confounds all notion of time; effaces all memory of a beginning, all fear of an end.”
  • Maurice Baring
    Maurice Baring
    “Memory is the greatest of artists, and effaces from your mind what is unnecessary.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. effacer,; pref. es-,L. ex,) + face, face; prop., to destroy the face or form. See Face, and cf. Deface
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. effacer—L. ex, out, facies, face.

Usage

In literature:

Look me in the face, Charmian, and answer me as fearlessly as a mirror: did Olympus really succeed in effacing the wrinkles?
"Cleopatra, Complete" by Georg Ebers
No rain will wash a single one of them away, and I hope it won't efface the least word of my speech either.
"In The Fire Of The Forge, Complete" by Georg Ebers
Neither years nor decades would efface the wrong inflicted upon me to-day.
"Barbara Blomberg, Complete" by Georg Ebers
Sinai, and in doing so, one effaced a letter with its wing.
"A Word Only A Word, Complete" by Georg Ebers
He was beginning to win his way to her regard by judiciously effacing himself.
"A Fascinating Traitor" by Richard Henry Savage
Having effaced himself from the calculation, justice became forgiveness.
"The March Of The White Guard" by Gilbert Parker
Nothing could possess him wholly; nothing inherent could make him self-effacing.
"The Weavers, Complete" by Gilbert Parker
He made a step towards them, and then strode on losing himself fast in the cool effacing fog.
"Three Soldiers" by John Dos Passos
The Indians said there were other rocks near it which bore similar markings until effaced by tides and drifting ice.
"Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Complete" by Charles M. Skinner
Laurent swiftly effaced this drawing and tried another.
"Therese Raquin" by Emile Zola
This new experience was very agreeable to her, so agreeable that it almost effaced her previous emotion about Philip.
"The Mill on the Floss" by George Eliot
It was one of those Titanic struggles which Time cannot efface from the memory.
"The Man Upstairs" by P. G. Wodehouse
These advantages have often been enough to efface every idea of danger.
"Good Sense" by Paul Henri Thiry, Baron D'Holbach
How curiously had his face altered, how shadowy it had grown, effacing the charm of youth, in it.
"The Fighting Chance" by Robert W. Chambers
Our names alone survive: no revolution can efface them.
"The Parisians, Complete" by Edward Bulwer-Lytton
The demon in her had never been so plain, the woman never so effaced.
"The History of David Grieve" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
It probably seemed to her that that old debt had been more than effaced.
"Robert Elsmere" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
Law alone can efface the wrong which law has done me.
"Night and Morning, Complete" by Edward Bulwer-Lytton
At the entrance of the grotto are engraved these lines, nearly effaced by the hand of time.
"A Visit to the Monastery of La Trappe in 1817" by W.D. Fellowes
The home of Christianity was effaced.
"A Short History of France" by Mary Platt Parmele
***

In poetry:

But I've always loved the jewels,
Always thought that it was cruel,
To efface their youthful beauty
It has been a life-time duty.
"The Simple Reason. III John, 1:4" by Frank Barbour Coffin
And I left the lake; but never
Shall the years to come efface
From my heart the dream and vision
Of that strange and lonely place.
"Lake Como" by Abram Joseph Ryan
Those wrinkles mock your daily toil,
No labor will efface 'em,
You wear a mask of smoothest oil,
Yet still with ease we trace 'em.
"On A Similar Character (From The Greek)" by William Cowper
For, let me say, the wilding placed
By hands unseen amongst these stones,
Restores a Past by Time effaced,
Lost loves and long-forgotten tones!
"Moss on a Wall" by Henry Kendall
His epitaph shall mock the short-lived stone,
No lichen shall its lines efface,
He needs these few and simple lines alone
To mark his resting-place:
"To The Memory Of Hood" by James Russell Lowell
Man pays the debt with new munificence,
Not piecemeal now, not slowly, by the old;
Not grudgingly, by the effaced thin pence,
But greatly and in gold.
"Lord I Owe Thee a Death" by Alice Meynell

In news:

Philip Youn, a senior consultant with the International Biometric Group, says prints don't register as well with certain groups such as construction workers whose fingerprints have been effaced.
Her jokes were always self-effacing and hysterically funny.
Because Scott is low-key, even self-effacing, he is underestimated by the loud-voiced crowd.
'Foolish and Backward Nation': A Self-Effacing Chinese Satire of America.
A Self-Effacing Scholar Is Psychiatry's Gadfly.
Quiet and self-effacing, he's an unlikely hero for 9/11 conspiracy theorists of every stripe, but that's exactly what he's become.
It's duty dads gladly embrace amid self-effacing humor, jokes about getting a second job and wondering if you can still get paid for blood donations.
Though his subjects were the enduring ones—lovelessness, being alone, " desire for self-effacement," "the static past"—the past was not yet static as having electric limits.
There's a self-effacing charm to the semiautobiographical yarns of comedian Mike Birbiglia.
' Foolish and Backward Nation': A Self-Effacing Chinese Satire of America.
Self-effacing driver knows how to make the calm comeback.
In just about every way possible, according to the Tao of Buck Brannaman, the self-effacing hero and subject of Buck, an engaging and evocative documentary from filmmaker Cindy Meehl.
The adamantly deadpan story concerns a goodhearted, self-effacing killer… (Strand Releasing ).
Don't be fooled by his mellow, self-effacing demeanor: Architect Thomas Phifer is a master of his craft, designing daylit, minimalist buildings that meld the ideals of classic modernism with 21st-century innovations.
At times, he can be sensitive, self-effacing, even chivalrous.
***

In science:

Cauchon, Effacement des d´erivations et spectres premiers des alg`ebres quantiques, J.
On Morita equivalence for simple Generalized Weyl algebras
Passing to cohomology we obtain i). ii) In dimension 1, the effacability follows from the description of H 1 (C • st (D)) in terms of extensions (see Proposition 1.4.4 ii)).
A Generalization of Greenberg's $\Cal L$-invariant
Now prove that D 7→ H i (C • st(D)) is effacable in dimension 2.
A Generalization of Greenberg's $\Cal L$-invariant
Let cl(x) ∈ H 2 (C • usual way using effacability.
A Generalization of Greenberg's $\Cal L$-invariant
Existence and uniqueness follow from Corollary 1; alternatively, one can use the universal property of effaceable homological functors (see ).
Mixed Artin-Tate motives with finite coefficients
Damour calls this the “effacement” of the bodies’ internal structure.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
This effacement does not occur in an alternative gravitional theory like scalar-tensor gravity.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
Even though the strong-field nature of the bodies is effaced in GR, it is not in other theories, thus any result in agreement with the predictions of GR constitutes a kind of “null” test of strong-field gravity.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
Damour calls this the “effacement” of the bodies’ internal structure.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
This effacement does not occur in an alternative gravitional theory like scalar-tensor gravity.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
Even though the strong-field nature of the bodies is effaced in GR, it is not in other theories, thus any result in agreement with the predictions of GR constitutes a kind of “null” test of strong-field gravity.
The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment
Kopeikin spoke about the irrelevancy of the internal structure of gravitating bodies (i.e. the effacement principle) in the PN approximations of general relativity and scalar-tensor theories of gravity.
Post-Newtonian Approximations, Compact Binaries, and Strong-Field Tests of Gravity
He argued that in general relativity the effacing principle is violated by terms proportional to the rotational moments of inertia of the fourth order.
Post-Newtonian Approximations, Compact Binaries, and Strong-Field Tests of Gravity
In the scalar-tensor theories of gravity the violation begins earlier, by the terms proportional to the second order rotational moments of inertia.51 When the effacement principle is violated, the equations of motion of extended bodies differ from those of point-like particles.
Post-Newtonian Approximations, Compact Binaries, and Strong-Field Tests of Gravity
In the limit where the size of the body is taken to be close to the Schwarzschild radius rg = 2GM /c2 , Kopeikin evaluates that the effacement principle is violated in the 3PN approximation in the case of scalar-tensor theories, and in the 5PN approximation (terms of the order of (v/c)10 ) in general relativity.
Post-Newtonian Approximations, Compact Binaries, and Strong-Field Tests of Gravity
***