edifice

Definitions

  • Showing an edifice of several storeys
    Showing an edifice of several storeys
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n edifice a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place "there was a three-story building on the corner","it was an imposing edifice"
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Additional illustrations & photos:

In the British Museum: NORTH WEST EDIFICE NIMROUD In the British Museum: NORTH WEST EDIFICE NIMROUD

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The oldest man-made building of any kind still existing is the central edifice of the 4,600-year-old mastaba (a tomb for kings) built at Sakkara, Egypt. It was created to honor King Zoser, the first ruler of the Third Dynasty.
    • n Edifice A building; a structure; an architectural fabric; -- chiefly applied to elegant houses, and other large buildings; as, a palace, a church, a statehouse.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Owing to a faulty cornerstone, the church of St. John in Barmouth, Wales, crashed in ruins a minute after it was finished. It was rebuilt, and the new edifice has endured to the present day.
    • n edifice A building; a structure; an architectural fabric: applied chiefly to large or fine buildings, public or private.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Edifice a large building or house
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Quotations

  • George Santayana
    George%20Santayana
    “The loftiest edifices need the deepest foundations.”
  • Mark Twain
    Mark%20Twain
    “The highest perfection of politeness is only a beautiful edifice, built, from the base to the dome, of ungraceful and gilded forms of charitable and unselfish lying.”
  • Andre Maurois
    Andre%20Maurois
    “A successful marriage is an edifice that must be rebuilt every day.”
  • Prince Of Wales Charles
    Prince Of Wales Charles
    “The whole imposing edifice of modern medicine is like the celebrated tower of Pisa --slightly off balance.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. aedificium, fr. aedificare,: cf. F. édifice,. See Edify
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. édifier—L. ædificāreædes, a house, facĕre, to make.

Usage

In literature:

The edifice itself was of green stone, and sparkled in the sunlight like a colossal emerald.
"Edmond Dantès" by Edmund Flagg
The convent was a spacious edifice, but gloomy and forbidding, with the aspect of a prison.
"Monte-Cristo's Daughter" by Edmund Flagg
Buildings were everywhere in course of demolition, to make room for larger edifices.
"Aladdin & Co." by Herbert Quick
The present edifice was rebuilt under the eye of Pius IX., who was to have been buried here.
"Fair Italy, the Riviera and Monte Carlo" by W. Cope Devereux
He uncovered an edifice belonging to the age preceding the conquests of Alexander.
"The World's Greatest Books, Volume 19" by Various
As you traverse the streets, each edifice, be it lordly or humble, presents to your gaze some record of prouder days.
"Germany, Bohemia, and Hungary, Visited in 1837. Vol. II" by G. R. Gleig
He knew that the master could be at ease in any part of his church edifice.
"The Journal of Negro History, Volume 7, 1922" by Various
Such is the vista which this edifice with its contents opens and brightens before me.
"Glances at Europe" by Horace Greeley
Their edifices are marvels of artistic skill, and, by the time of Kait Bey, perfection seemed almost to have been reached.
"Travels in the Far East" by Ellen Mary Hayes Peck
A short distance to the east stands a long edifice, with lofty rooms, which was undoubtedly the dormitory, with large cellars beneath it.
"A Yacht Voyage Round England" by W.H.G. Kingston
There were scarcely any buildings on the valley side of the street, except one or two edifices of an ornamental or public character.
"Rollo in Scotland" by Jacob Abbott
Quite a number of the large and handsome edifices which you see in the engraving, on both sides the water, are hotels.
"Rollo in Geneva" by Jacob Abbott
The fact of its being an edifice of the Shinto religion is self-evident from the torii which stand before every Shinto temple.
"The Empire of the East" by H. B. Montgomery
Higher up Queen Street, and in the cross-streets, stone and brick edifices are less numerous, and wooden houses more plentiful.
"Brighter Britain! (Volume 1 of 2)" by William Delisle Hay
Many of these edifices were large and commodious, containing several rooms.
"Ferdinand De Soto, The Discoverer of the Mississippi" by John S. C. Abbott
This ancient edifice was built by William Rufus, the son of the Conqueror himself.
"John and Betty's History Visit" by Margaret Williamson
In Priory Road is St. Mary's Church, a fine stone edifice in the Gothic style, dating from 1857.
"Hampstead and Marylebone" by Geraldine Edith Mitton
After the last Arab invasion, an extemporaneous edifice was erected in place of the shrine which had been demolished.
"The Cathedrals of Northern Spain" by Charles Rudy
The capitals are among the great glories of the edifice.
"Cathedrals of Spain" by John A. (John Allyne) Gade
The little villa of La Rocca was now a holy edifice.
"The Daltons, Volume II (of II) Or,Three Roads In Life" by Charles James Lever
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In poetry:

Feign then what's by a decent tact believed,
And act that state is only so conceived,
And build an edifice of form
For house where phantoms may keep warm.
"This Last Pain" by William Empson
If neither palaces nor robes
Nor unguents nor expensive toddy
Insure Contentment's soothing bliss,
Why should I build an edifice
Where Envy comes to fret a body?
"In Praise Of Contentment" by Eugene Field
Thou hast beheld him shape the pyramids,
Heap up the mound and build the massive wall,
Create the castle and the towering spire,
The ponderous dome and stately edifice.
"Metabole." by Alfred Castner King
Herbert's chapel at Bemerton
Hardly more spacious is than this;
But poet and pastor, blent in one,
Clothed with a splendor, as of the sun,
That lowly and holy edifice.
"Ultima Thule: Old St. David's At Radnor" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
XXIX. Fear to whom fear, to whom is honour due
Still honour yield — the fabric nicely ranged
In parts proportional, of seemly view,
Were ill for looser edifice exchanged.
"The Toils Of The Voyager" by George Jehoshaphat Mountain
For ages an edifice here has been found,
It is not a dwelling, it is not a Pane;
A horseman for hundreds of days may ride round,
Yet the end of his journey he ne'er can attain.
"Parables And Riddles" by Friedrich von Schiller

In news:

The faded mocha edifice that until last year housed CBS's Columbia Square studios looks at first glance completely abandoned.
From outside, Palais Coburg looks imposing enough, its neoclassical edifice looming over a small street in the center of Vienna.
SPS Commerce buys Edifice for its Internet supply chain system.
The brutalist, 36-year-old J. Edgar Hoover building, which houses the Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters in an entire block on Pennsylvania Avenue, has long been maligned as downtown D.C.'s ugliest edifice.
This story was written by Raúl A Carrillo, Harvard Crimson Yesterday morning, the leaders of Indias right-wing Bharatiya Janata Party called for a United Nations mandate to destroy the edifice of terrorism in Pakistan through intervention.
James Church, an imposing 19th century neo-Gothic edifice that is among Chicago's oldest houses of worship, will be demolished — likely within months — according to the city's Roman Catholic Archdiocese .
Some Oppose Plans To Raze Unique Chicago Edifice.
Mary's is such an imposing and eye-drawing edifice on the other side of the street.
James Church, an imposing 19th century neo-Gothic edifice that is among Chicago's oldest houses of worship, will be demolished — likely within months — according to the city's Roman Catholic Archdiocese.
SALEM — When you see the large glass and steel edifice that Warren Shore built on Technology Way as the new headquarters of United States Biological Corp.
And that's the rock on which the Catholic church has built the natural law edifice of its opposition to.
An Edifice Over an Abyss.
Inspired by an architectural icon, the De La Warr chair was commissioned in 2005 for the reopening of the De La Warr Pavilion , a modernist edifice built in 1935 in the English town of Bexhill-on-Sea.
When pastor Andrena Ingram throws open the doors of St Michael's Lutheran Church in Mount Airy, she almost seems to jar the spacious 283-year-old edifice from a long slumber.
When a new brick sanctuary was erected in 1843 on West Winter Street in downtown Delaware, it replaced the small stone edifice that previously housed the congregation of First Presbyterian Church.
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