dripstone

Definitions

  • Dripstone
    Dripstone
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n dripstone a protective drip that is made of stone
    • n dripstone the form of calcium carbonate found in stalactites and stalagmites
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Dripstone (Arch) A drip, when made of stone. See Drip, 2.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n dripstone In architecture, a projecting molding or cornice over a doorway, window, etc., to prevent rain-water from trickling down. It is of various forms, and terminates at each end in a head or other sculptured device serving for support or merely for ornament, or sometimes in a simple molding. Also called weather-molding, or hood-molding, and, when returned square, label.
    • n dripstone A filtering-stone: so called by seamen.
    • n dripstone Same as stalagmite.
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Usage

In literature:

But you will be as doleful as a dripstone if you marry for money.
"Father Goriot" by Honore de Balzac
The church here has the Pelham buckle as a dripstone.
"Seaward Sussex" by Edric Holmes
Reynard's Cave is four miles west of Galena on the farm of Dr. Fox, but is so nearly filled up with dripstone that only crawling room remains.
"Cave Regions of the Ozarks and Black Hills" by Luella Agnes Owen
At the east end is a three-light window without any transom, with an obtuse arch under a dripstone.
"Bell's Cathedrals: Wimborne Minster and Christchurch Priory" by Thomas Perkins
On three sides of the tower the dripstone is almost perfect.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Abbey Church of Tewkesbury" by H. J. L. J. Massé
The dripstone of the window terminates in two carved heads.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Rochester" by G. H. Palmer
The terminations of the dripstones are foliated and stand out detached.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Ripon" by Cecil Walter Charles Hallett
Before passing to the dripstone, however, let us examine a little farther into the nature of the true cornice.
"The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3)" by John Ruskin
Above is a dripstone and string-course.
"Cathedral Cities of Italy" by William Wiehe Collins
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