drama

Definitions

  • Fancy Picture of Hanwellian Admirer of the Ibsenesque Drama thoroughly enjoying himself
    Fancy Picture of Hanwellian Admirer of the Ibsenesque Drama thoroughly enjoying himself
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n drama the quality of being arresting or highly emotional
    • n drama the literary genre of works intended for the theater
    • n drama a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
    • n drama an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional
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Additional illustrations & photos:

MODERN DRAMA BELOW STAIRS MODERN DRAMA BELOW STAIRS
Elizabethan Drama Elizabethan Drama

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Daytime dramas are called Soap Operas because they were originally used to advertise soap powder. In America in the early days of TV, advertisers would write stories around the use of their soap powder
    • Drama A composition, in prose or poetry, accommodated to action, and intended to exhibit a picture of human life, or to depict a series of grave or humorous actions of more than ordinary interest, tending toward some striking result. It is commonly designed to be spoken and represented by actors on the stage. "A divine pastoral drama in the Song of Solomon."
    • Drama A series of real events invested with a dramatic unity and interest. "The drama of war.""Westward the course of empire takes its way;
      The four first acts already past,
      A fifth shall close the drama with the day;
      Time's noblest offspring is the last."
      "The drama and contrivances of God's providence."
    • Drama Dramatic composition and the literature pertaining to or illustrating it; dramatic literature.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: In 1975, it cost only $180,000 to produce an hour-long TV drama.
    • n drama A story put into action, or a story of human life told by actual representation of persons by persons, with imitation of language, voice, gesture, dress, and accessories or surrounding conditions, the whole produced with reference to truth or probability, and with or without the aid of music, dancing, painting, and decoration; a play.
    • n drama A composition in verse or prose, or in both, presenting in dialogue a course of human action, designed, or seemingly designed, to be spoken in character and represented on the stage; a form of imitated and represented action regulated by literary canons; the description of a story converted into the action of a play, and thereby constituting a department of literary art: as, the classic drama; the Hindu drama; the Elizabethan drama. The construction of such a composition is, as a general rule, marked by three stages: first, the opening of the movement; second, the growth or development of the action; third, the close or catastrophe, which must in all cases be the consequence of the action itself, as unfolded in acts, scenes, and situations. The drama, whether in actual life or mimic representation, assumes two principal forms, namely, tragedy and comedy; and from modifications or combinations of these result the mixed or minor forms, known as tragicomedy, melodrama, lyric drama or grand opera, opera bouffe, farce, and burletta. Other forms, suggested by the subject and the manner of presenting it, are the nautical drama, the pastoral drama, the society drama, etc. Both tragedy and comedy attained a high degree of development in the ancient Greek drama, which originated in the worship of Bacchus.
    • n drama Dramatic representation with its adjuncts; theatrical entertainment: as, he has a strong taste for the drama.
    • n drama Action, humanly considered; a course of connected acts, involving motive, procedure, and purpose, and by a related sequence of events or episodes leading up to a catastrophe or crowning issue.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Drama dram′a a story of human life and action represented by actors imitating the language, dress, &c. of the original characters: a composition intended to be represented on the stage: dramatic literature: theatrical entertainment: a series of deeply interesting events
    • ***

Quotations

  • Mark Twain
    Mark%20Twain
    “There was never yet an uninteresting life. Such a thing is an impossibility. Inside of the dullest exterior there is a drama, a comedy, and a tragedy.”
  • Igor Stravinsky
    Igor Stravinsky
    “Film music should have the same relationship to the film drama that somebody's piano playing in my living room has to the book I am reading.”
  • Wilson Mizner
    Wilson%20Mizner
    “A drama critic is a person who surprises the playwright by informing him what he meant.”
  • Kenneth Tynan
    Kenneth Tynan
    “A good drama critic is one who perceives what is happening in the theatre of his time. A great drama critic also perceives what is not happening.”
  • Minna Antrim
    Minna%20Antrim
    “The drama of life begins with a wail and ends with a sigh.”
  • Barbara De Angelis
    Barbara%20De%20Angelis
    “What allows us, as human beings, to psychologically survive life on earth, with all of its pain, drama, and challenges, is a sense of purpose and meaning”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. drama, Gr. dra^ma, fr. dra^n to do, act; cf. Lith. daryti,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L.,—Gr. drama, dramatosdraein, to do.

Usage

In literature:

All the dramas I act in after this will be on dry land.
"Dave Porter At Bear Camp" by Edward Stratemeyer
That blank verse is better adapted than any other for the drama, has been settled by Shakspeare.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845" by Various
No more superb setting could have been chosen for the opening scenes of the New World drama.
"Carmen Ariza" by Charles Francis Stocking
Critics of the early drama are equally one-sided.
"Hours in a Library" by Leslie Stephen
The drama, not the philosophy, of life is the sphere of their intellectual activity.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume 9" by Robert Louis Stevenson
This expedient is therefore of especial importance in the drama.
"Materials and Methods of Fiction" by Clayton Hamilton
If we make these qualifications, we may fairly say that the old drama died and that a new drama was born.
"An Introduction to Shakespeare" by H. N. MacCracken
In 1914 his biblical drama, Simson (Samson), was produced with mixed success.
"Ivory Apes and Peacocks" by James Huneker
DRAMA, anecdotes of the early, ii.
"Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3)" by Isaac Disraeli
The result was the gradual evolution of a type of hero which modified the drama of the country.
"The German Classics, v. 20" by Various
We can at need fix the exact period of the origin of the drama.
"The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare" by J. J. Jusserand
In a drama of the highest order there is little food for censure or hatred; it teaches rather self-knowledge and self-respect.
"English Critical Essays" by Various
Dick listened, commended the drama of it, and yet found it drama only.
"Old Crow" by Alice Brown
Tchekoff has also tried himself out on the drama, and he has there established himself in a peculiar manner.
"Contemporary Russian Novelists" by Serge Persky
A woman only could have imagined that divine drama.
"Recreations of Christopher North, Volume I (of 2)" by John Wilson
The natural transition from story to play, from narrative to drama, is by way of the monologue.
"Vocal Expression" by Katherine Jewell Everts
This summer I went to the Glastonbury Musical Festival and heard one of the wonderful song-dramas which are produced there.
"Loyal to the School" by Angela Brazil
He was believed to aid Euripides in composing his dramas.
"Library of the World's Best literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 12" by Various
For the Examining Magistrate, the drama in which he was about to unravel the mystery was to begin.
"The Crime of the Boulevard" by Jules Claretie
They were influential as patrons of the early drama, and as producers of amateur dramatists.
"Francis Beaumont: Dramatist" by Charles Mills Gayley
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In poetry:

My Puritan training
Has kept me from going
To dramas in which
Little Olga was showing.
"Footlight Motifs" by Franklin Pierce Adams
Bernard.
Most unexpectedly I found myself
Spectator of a scene in a home-drama
Worth all stage-tragedies I ever saw.
"Within and Without: Part IV: A Dramatic Poem" by George MacDonald
As if the intenser drama
Shown me there
Of what the walls had witnessed
Filled the air,
And left no room for later passion anywhere.
"The Re-Enactment" by Thomas Hardy
Just dreaming, loving, dying so,
The actors in the drama go--
A flitting picture on a wall,
Love, Death, the themes; but is that all?
"The Sum" by Paul Laurence Dunbar
He wrote a play; by day and night
He strove with passion and delight;
Yet knew, long ere the curtain drop,
His drama was a sorry flop.
"Failure" by Robert W Service
Wouldst thou fashion the song, O! Poet-heart,
For a mission high and free?
The drama of Life, in its every part,
Must a living poem be.
"The Poet's Lesson" by Mary Gardiner Horsford

In news:

Brevity , wit make good drama.
Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling turn in achingly realistic performances in the somber drama 'Blue Valentine'.
Milla Jovovich plays an immigrant con artist on the lam with her 10-year-old son in this drama by Famke Janssen.
That seems to be the question exasperated investors are asking after another tedious plot twist in a Greek drama that has lasted far beyond the curtain call.
As with Fish Tank and Red Road, Arnold's previous feature-length dramas, the new Wuthering Heights is very much about the act of looking.
Writer-director Tanya Hamilton's striking debut is the rare recent American-independent film that goes beyond the private dramas of its protagonists, imagining them as players in broader historical moments.
Stages Theatre's Fullerton staging is almost devoid of emotion, which spells doom for Shakespeare's 1599 historical drama.
Thursday night was opening night of the Buhl High School drama department's performance of the classic play "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night".
That it doesn't matter if you're promoting a musical, a comedy or a historical drama - highlighting Zac Efron's buff bod is the defacto marketing plan.
Matthias Schoenaerts' raging bull a standout performance in crime drama that's light on crime, heavy on drama.
A drama with balls about a guy with none.
Crime Drama Directed by: Michael R Roskam Starring: Matthias Schoenaerts, Jeroen Perceval, Jeanne Dandoy, Barbara Sarafian, Tibo Vandenborre.
Actor and 30 Seconds to Mars frontman Jared Leto is stepping before the cameras for the first time in three years for The Dallas Buyer 's Club, joining Matthew McConaughey and Jennifer Garner in the long-in-the-works AIDS drama.
Is it 'suspenseful,' 'cerebral,' or a 'sentimental dysfunctional-family drama'.
Mikael Marcimain's drama is inspired by a real-world scandal involving Swedish politicians and prostitution.
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In science:

As an example, in the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) a query can be used to check whether the average rank of action movies is higher than the average rank of drama movies.
Query Significance in Databases via Randomizations
If certain structures or patterns remain after simple randomizations (e.g., the fact that history movies are also drama movies in the toy example), the answers of a query that rely on such patterns should be regarded as not significant.
Query Significance in Databases via Randomizations
Another very similar query is: select drama movies and project age only.
Query Significance in Databases via Randomizations
On the relation GM, drama movies and history movies have no independent edges to swap between them.
Query Significance in Databases via Randomizations
Given a CSTNU S , a drama is any pair (s, ω), where s is a scenario, and ω is a situation.
The Dynamic Controllability of Conditional STNs with Uncertainty
Next, the projection of a CSTNU onto a drama, (s, ω), is defined.
The Dynamic Controllability of Conditional STNs with Uncertainty
An execution strategy for S is a mapping, σ : (I × Ω) → ΨT , such that for each drama, (s, ω), the domain of σ(s, ω) is T + s . σ is called viable if for each drama, (s, ω), the schedule σ(s, ω) is a solution to the projection, drPrj (s, ω).
The Dynamic Controllability of Conditional STNs with Uncertainty
For any time-point X and drama (s, ω), the execution time of X in the schedule, σ(s, ω), is denoted by [σ(s, ω)]X .
The Dynamic Controllability of Conditional STNs with Uncertainty
Let σ be an execution strategy for S , (s, ω) some drama, and t some real number.
The Dynamic Controllability of Conditional STNs with Uncertainty
However, suppose that there is some drama, (s, ω), such that: (1) the label αβ γ is true in scenario s; but (2) the schedule, σ(s, ω), does not satisfy the constraint, (Y − X ≤ v).
The Dynamic Controllability of Conditional STNs with Uncertainty
Recently BHC has been challenged by Almheiri, Marolf, Polchinski and Sully (AMPS) . who argued that the postulates of BHC are mutually inconsistent; in particular, they claim that the purity postulate, the assumption of semiclassical QFT outside the black hole, and the no-drama postulate lead to a contradiction1 .
Black Hole Complementarity and the Harlow-Hayden Conjecture
According to BHC such an observer sees “no drama” at the horizon, meaning that she sees the ordered Minkowski vacuum of a field theory like the one in Section 2.1.
Black Hole Complementarity and the Harlow-Hayden Conjecture
Therefore the no-drama postulate of BHC requires that the A, B pairs remain in a state of maximal entanglement as the black hole evaporates5 .
Black Hole Complementarity and the Harlow-Hayden Conjecture
Loss of H, B Entanglement In the infalling frame A, B entanglement is essential for the no-drama postulate, i.e., for the existence of a smooth horizon.
Black Hole Complementarity and the Harlow-Hayden Conjecture
The eyewitnesses convey to us the drama of one of the deepest discoveries in theoretical physics in the 20th century.
Introduction to "The Supersymmetric World: The Beginnings of The Theory"
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