doctrine of analogy

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n doctrine of analogy the religious belief that between creature and creator no similarity can be found so great but that the dissimilarity is always greater; any analogy between God and humans will always be inadequate
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Usage

In literature:

Martin Luther was especially drawn to believe in the alchemistic doctrine of transmutation by this analogy.
"History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom" by Andrew Dickson White
In other words, she aimed at the proclamation of something in the nature of a Far Eastern doctrine analogous to that of Monroe.
"The Inside Story Of The Peace Conference" by Emile Joseph Dillon
The analogy of the Old Testament, and also of the New, leads to the acknowledgment of doctrinal developments.
"Apologia pro Vita Sua" by John Henry Newman
The doctrine of analogies recurs.
"The Confidence-Man" by Herman Melville
The analogy of the Old Testament, and also of the New, leads to the acknowledgment of doctrinal developments.
"Apologia Pro Vita Sua" by John Henry Cardinal Newman
Finally, precisely the same analogy forces itself upon us in the Christian doctrine of the way of salvation.
"The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality" by Rudolf Schmid
The customs of those people were very analogous to the doctrines that directed them.
"The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 28 of 55)" by Various
The doctrine of the Trinity can be best understood from an analogy of man.
"The Hearts of Men" by H. Fielding
The points of analogy, both in doctrine and practice, are very numerous and strikingly brought out, pp.
"Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates, 3rd ed. Volume I (of 4)" by George Grote
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