diorama

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n diorama a picture (or series of pictures) representing a continuous scene
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Diorama A building used for such an exhibition.
    • Diorama A mode of scenic representation, invented by Daguerre and Bouton, in which a painting is seen from a distance through a large opening. By a combination of transparent and opaque painting, and of transmitted and reflected light, and by contrivances such as screens and shutters, much diversity of scenic effect is produced.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n diorama A spectacular painting, or a connected series of paintings, intended for exhibition to spectators in a darkened room, in a manner to produce by optical illusions an appearance of reality. The paintings are so executed and arranged that a variety of effects may be induced by varying the direction, intensity, and color of the light; one of the most notable of these effects coming from light transmitted through the picture itself, which is painted in transparent coloring on a thin fabric. Different scences may be painted on the two faces of the fabric, and a change from one to the other may be made by altering the soucre of the illumination. A daylight scene may be thus changed with wonderful realism to one by moonlight, or a desert place may become all at once peopled by a busy crowd. The diorama was devised in 1822 by Daguerre (the chief inventor of photography) and Bouton.
    • n diorama A building in which dioramic paintings are exhibited.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Diorama dī-ō-rä′ma an exhibition of pictures, illuminated, and viewed through an opening in the wall of a darkened chamber
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. to see through; = dia` through + to see; cf. that which is seen, a sight: cf. F. diorama,. Cf. Panorama
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. dia, through, horama, a sight.

Usage

In literature:

Apart from motions, a complete diorama of the fluctuations of the game went on in their eyes.
"Return of the Native" by Thomas Hardy
The memory has as many moods as the temper, and shifts its scenery like a diorama.
"Middlemarch" by George Eliot
What a heap of play-tickets, diorama-tickets, concert-tickets, he used to give you!
"The Wolves and the Lamb" by William Makepeace Thackeray
I was once at a diorama in Rotunda.
"A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" by James Joyce
The diorama had no sudden changes or striking contrasts, for a universal forest of green trees clothed every peak, cone, and summit.
"How I Found Livingstone" by Henry M. Stanley
The place, as we rode along, presented a shifting diorama of delightful views.
"The Lands of the Saracen" by Bayard Taylor
Cosmoramas and Dioramas, 430.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction" by Various
To fit out the diorama, it needed about $15,000.
"The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 2" by Rupert Hughes
The latest stages of the process might be represented by a diorama.
"Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development" by Francis Galton
It is a fragmentary diorama of finite life-processes seen from the outside, and very imperfectly known.
"Outspoken Essays" by William Ralph Inge
Apart from motions, a complete diorama of the fluctuations of the game went on in their eyes.
"The Return of the Native" by Thomas Hardy
Mrs. Darcy wants a circus-poster, or the canvas of a diorama.
"My New Curate" by P.A. Sheehan
They espied the diorama and it interested them very much.
"A Little Girl in Old New York" by Amanda Millie Douglas
Diorama of Tropical Banana Plantation, late 19th century.
"Agricultural Implements and Machines in the Collection of the National Museum of History and Technology" by John T. Schlebecker
Historique et description des procedes du daguerreotype et du diorama, Paris, 1839.
"A History of Science, Volume 5(of 5)" by Henry Smith Williams
She wheeled away and paused at the next diorama to set down a doll-house in a child's room diorama.
"Makers" by Cory Doctorow
The biography is a succession of scenes, a diorama.
"The Cradle of the Christ" by Octavius Brooks Frothingham
There is another very common error, that of calling a diorama a panorama.
"The Ladies' Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners" by Eliza Leslie
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In news:

There's a really cool service station in town (sadly closed) that I might attempt for a diorama.
Tamiya has added a British light utility (" Tilly ") car to its 1/48 scale lineup, a move that should please builders of dioramas and aircraft alike.
A Dublin Diorama Reveals A Very Untidy Francis Bacon.
Woolly mammoth diorama with museum worker.
Horror meets humor in Abigail Goldman's crime scene dioramas.
Celebrate National Library Week (April 8-14, 2012) at Ida Rupp Public Library by telling everyone why they belong at the library using marshmallow Peeps to create a diorama or shadow box.
Muji and tha ltd Create a Gorgeous Holiday Cookie Diorama.
Kirk Johnson of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science gestures to visitors from inside a diorama featuring Campbell Island animals such as elephant seals and rockhopper penguins.
An open house is set for Tuesday introduce the newly renovated home of Heurlin's work and a new diorama by Dave Lyons that shows what gold dredging was like in Interior Alaska.
Pioneers plan open house Tuesday to showcase Heurlin paintings, gold dredge diorama.
Tour of Dioramas (Source: Jihad Museum).
These Tiny Dioramas Have Seen Some Big Disasters.
Jim Lund 's diorama of the China Clipper (perhaps laying to with a service boat in attendance) — photo by Joseph May.
One of the many famous dioramas offered by the American Museum of Natural History .
Hiroshi Sugimoto photographing diorama displays that get extra attention before a shoot in Manhattan.
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