diamagnetism

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n diamagnetism phenomenon exhibited by materials like copper or bismuth that become magnetized in a magnetic field with a polarity opposite to the magnetic force; unlike iron they are slightly repelled by a magnet
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Diamagnetism The magnetic action which characterizes diamagnetic substances, the magnetic moments of which tend to oppose an externally applied magnetic field. Contrasted with paramagnetism and ferromagnetism.
    • Diamagnetism The science which treats of diamagnetic phenomena, and of the properties of diamagnetic bodies.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n diamagnetism The phenomena exhibited by a class of substances which, when under the influence of magnetism and freely suspended, take a position with the longer axis at right angles to the magnetic lines of force. From the experiments of Faraday it appears to be clearly established that all matter is subject to the magnetic force as universally as it is to the gravitating force, arranging itself into two divisions, the paramagnetic and the diamagnetic. Among the former are iron, nickel, cobalt, palladium, titanium, and a few other substances; and among the latter are bismuth, antimony, cadmium, copper, gold, lead, mercury, silver, tin, zinc, and most solid, liquid, and gaseous substances. When a paramagnetic substance is suspended freely between the poles of a powerful horseshoe magnet, it points in a line from one pole to the other, which Faraday terms the axial line. On the other hand, when a diamagnetic substance is suspended in the same manner, it is repelled alike by both poles, and assumes an equatorial direction, or a direction at right angles to the axial line.
    • n diamagnetism That branch of magnetism which treats of diamagnetic phenomena and diamagnetic bodies.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Diamagnetism the form of magnetic action possessed by diamagnetic bodies: the branch of magnetism which deals with diamagnetic phenomena
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. dia, through, magnētēs, magnēs, a magnet.

Usage

In literature:

So far an identity of action was established between magnetic and diamagnetic bodies.
"Faraday As A Discoverer" by John Tyndall
The properties of paramagnetism and diamagnetism are not possessed by solids only, but exist also in liquids and gases.
"Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIV" by John Lord
By a similar arrangement the feeble attractions and repulsions of the diamagnetic force have been made manifest.
"Six Lectures on Light" by John Tyndall
They are triatomic, diamagnetic, and positive.
"Occult Chemistry" by Annie Besant and Charles W. Leadbeater
If we present to it the vibrating body, it will be repelled, and we shall obtain the results known by the name of diamagnetism.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 315, January 14, 1882" by Various
They are called the diamagnetics.
"Electricity for Boys" by J. S. Zerbe
Rapidly following it is the discovery of Diamagnetism, or the repulsion of matter by a magnet.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
These rays impinge upon a diamagnetic surface which is concave.
"Second Sight" by Sepharial
Diamagnetism, its etymology, 169.
"Notes and Queries, Index of Volume 3, January-June, 1851" by Various
A diamagnetic body is one which is not so magnetic as the medium in which it is suspended.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia" by Various
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In news:

We model this magneto-orientation as a strictly passive, nonphysiological response to a magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic components of the paramecia.
We model this magneto-orientation as a strictly passive, nonphysiological response to a magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic components of the paramecia .
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In science:

Foo et al. have suggested that there are strong correlations between the Na ions and the charge carriers (in this case 2 holes (C o4+ ) hopping in a diamagnetic background of C o3+ ions).
Investigation of the Spin Density Wave in NaxCoO2
However, for orbital magnetism, Bext cannot be separated out cleanly like this due to the diamagnetic term, and one is limited to Eq. (48) if the diamagnetic contribution is significant.
Free energies in the presence of electric and magnetic fields
The intrinsic anomalous Hall effect in metallic ferromagnets is shown to be controlled by Berry phases accumulated by adiabatic motion of quasiparticles on the Fermi surface, and is purely a Fermi-liquid property, not a “bulk” Fermi sea property like Landau diamagnetism, as has been previously supposed.
Berry Curvature on the Fermi Surface: Anomalous Hall Effect as a Topological Fermi-Liquid Property
Note the differences between density and energy shifts due to Landau quantization: the latter derive from changes to states deep below the Fermi level, and Landau diamagnetism is not a Fermi surface effect.
Berry Curvature on the Fermi Surface: Anomalous Hall Effect as a Topological Fermi-Liquid Property
The different Tc values were obtained from the onset of the diamagnetic signal (see inset for the real (closed symbols) and imaginary (open symbols) parts of the magnetic susceptibility.
Dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on the doping level in single crystalline diamond films
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