deprecatory

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj deprecatory tending to diminish or disparage "belittling comments","managed a deprecating smile at the compliment","deprecatory remarks about the book","a slighting remark"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • deprecatory Serving to deprecate; expressing a low opinion of.
    • deprecatory Tending to remove or avert evil by prayer; apologetic. "Humble and deprecatory letters."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • deprecatory Serving or intended to deprecate or avert some threatened evil or action; characterized by entreaty or protest intended to avert something evil or painful.
    • n deprecatory A deprecating speech or act.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adjs Deprecatory tending to avert evil by prayer: having the form of prayer
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. deprecatorius,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. deprecāri, deprecātusde, away, and precāri, to pray.

Usage

In literature:

Ottawa chiefs did not thrust themselves forward, and when they spoke it was in a deprecatory way.
"The Riflemen of the Ohio" by Joseph A. Altsheler
The "straightforward chap" made a deprecatory gesture, and then yielded obligingly.
"A Son of Hagar" by Sir Hall Caine
There was an air at once deprecatory and insinuating about the rascal that I thought I recognised.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 20 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
The little man made a deprecatory gesture.
"The Bandbox" by Louis Joseph Vance
Clarissa made a deprecatory gesture, yet she retained a friendly and calm air.
"The German Classics, v. 20" by Various
It even raised a deprecatory claw.
"The Monster and Other Stories" by Stephen Crane
There was a gentle, deprecatory air about him that reminded Wyn strongly of Polly herself.
"Wyn's Camping Days" by Amy Bell Marlowe
The question was met by a deprecatory laugh.
"A Frontier Mystery" by Bertram Mitford
Then he would wait with anticipated pleasure the deprecatory grimace, the penitent, appealing glance.
"Lady Cassandra" by Mrs George de Horne Vaizey
But the deprecatory smile on the other's face was beautiful to behold.
"The White Hand and the Black" by Bertram Mitford
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In news:

The word does have deprecatory and patronizing connotations that occasionally backfire.
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