deport

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v deport expel from a country "The poet was exiled because he signed a letter protesting the government's actions"
    • v deport hand over to the authorities of another country "They extradited the fugitive to his native country so he could be tried there"
    • v deport behave in a certain manner "She carried herself well","he bore himself with dignity","They conducted themselves well during these difficult times"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Ellis Island opened to begin the processing of what would amount to more than 20 million immigrants to the United States in 1892. The immigration center was also used as a deportation station, and later, a Coast Guard Station, and then, a national park. Ellis Island is now a museum.
    • n Deport Behavior; carriage; demeanor; deportment. "Goddesslike deport ."
    • Deport To carry or demean; to conduct; to behave; -- followed by the reflexive pronoun. "Let an ambassador deport himself in the most graceful manner befor a prince."
    • Deport To transport; to carry away; to exile; to send into banishment; to expel (from a region or country). "He told us he had been deported to Spain."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • deport To transport or carry off; carry away, or from one country to another; specifically, to transport forcibly, as to a penal colony or a place of exile.
    • deport To carry; demean; behave: with a reflexive pronoun.
    • n deport Deportment; mien.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Deport de-pōrt′ to transport, to exile: to behave
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Quotations

  • James F. Cooper
    James%20F.%20Cooper
    “A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. déporter, to transport for life, OF., to divert, amuse, from L. deportare, to carry away; de-, + portare, to carry. See Port demeanor
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. deportārede, away, and portāre, -ātum, to carry.

Usage

In literature:

His piety was genuine and fervent, and diffused a sober dignity over his whole deportment.
"The World's Greatest Books, Vol X" by Various
And, secondly, in many districts, unemployment has been deliberately created by the authorities in order to justify the deportations.
"Through the Iron Bars" by Emile Cammaerts
Quite contentedly conventional in most matters of mere social deportment, she often resisted purely physical conventions.
"The Roll-Call" by Arnold Bennett
Of his drunken deportment, I can be sure, because I saw it.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 474" by Various
And he was interested in the clothes and in the deportment of the chauffeur.
"Mr. Prohack" by E. Arnold Bennett
At last they went out together, two models of style and deportment, and Helen pulled to the great front door with a loud echoing clang.
"Helen with the High Hand (2nd ed.)" by Arnold Bennett
Their amiable deportment and truly noble bearing have left on my mind a very favorable impression.
"The Young Captives" by Erasmus W. Jones
If a man thinks well of himself in matters of appearance his general deportment is likely to coincide.
"Laugh and Live" by Douglas Fairbanks
And her relief, beneath that stately deportment of hers, was pathetic in its simple intensity.
"The Price of Love" by Arnold Bennett
His deportment was grave and dignified, and his duties as a priest were always performed with exemplary diligence.
"Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 1 of 14" by Elbert Hubbard
He was elegant in his manners and bland and refined in his deportment.
"Eugene Field, A Study In Heredity And Contradictions" by Slason Thompson
In their deportment towards strangers they are queens, when, in costume, they are peasants.
"What I Saw in California" by Edwin Bryant
At these primitive tea parties the utmost propriety and dignity of deportment prevailed.
"Knickerbocker's History of New York, Complete" by Washington Irving
This deportment, surrounded by a guard of tall martial-looking men, all clad in skins.
"A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume X" by Robert Kerr
Our deporting division looks after that, and it is one of the hardest parts of our work.
"The Boy With the U.S. Census" by Francis Rolt-Wheeler
Deportation over-sea and confiscation of farms seem hard measures, and I hope more lenience will be shown.
"In the Ranks of the C.I.V." by Erskine Childers
She ordered the deportation of vagrant Irishmen in 1594.
"Our Legal Heritage, 5th Ed." by S. A. Reilly
It is not often that we see an artist so entirely free from affectation in his aspect and deportment.
"Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Vol. XV., No. 85. January, 1875." by Various
The elegant deportment of women had been largely supplanted by the rattle of hoydens and the giggling of the nursery.
"James Fenimore Cooper" by Thomas R. Lounsbury
The men are required to be quiet and orderly in their deportment in going to and returning from fires.
"Lights and Shadows of New York Life" by James D. McCabe
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In poetry:

Lovely in form, in features mild;
In thy deportment pure:
Zealous for right, e'en from a child,
A friend, both true and sure.
"To Miss Annie Eliza M'Namee" by David John Scott
Per melhs cobrir lo mal pes e.l cossire
chan e deport et ai joi e solatz;
e fatz esfortz car sai chantar ni rire,
car eu me mor e nul semblan no.n fatz;
e per Amor sui si apoderatz,
tot m'a vencut a forsa e batalha.
"Per mels cobrir lo mal pes (Anne)" by Bernard De Ventadorn

In news:

Better days await children orphaned by death, deportation.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images U.S.-born children with their undocumented parents demonstrating in Washington against recent deportations in July.
"With respect to the notion that I can just suspend deportations through executive order, that's just not the case, because there are laws on the books that Congress has passed".
Deports Bosnian sought for war crimes.
Lotus Communications' KWKW(AM) 1330 ESPN Deportes Los Angeles has partnered with the Los Angeles Boys & Girls Club for fundraising.
Michelle Yeoh, who plays pro-democracy champion Aung San Suu Kyi in an upcoming film, has been deported by army-dominated Myanmar and blacklisted, an official said on June 28, 2011.
Children brought to America by their parents before they were 16, will not be deported.
At least they won't be deported until after the election.
Some Detainees Are Drugged For Deportation.
But key to Wildes' argument were documents he found proving the government had overlooked deportation cases .
A fraudulent insurance claim involving a $64,000 BMW could result in a Duluth man's deportation, authorities said.
Her former husband was deported.
The larger-than-estimated crowd also showed its class by its very deportment throughout the evenings performances.
It would be interesting to know if any Kosovo Roma in London risk being socially cleansed before being deported back to the country that they were ethnically cleansed from.
He won a legal battle to avoid deportation from the UK to face terror charges in Jordan.
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In science:

To prevent this actuator from large axial effort, we placed two parallel gears deporting the motors relative to the axis vertebrae.
The eel-like robot
The exhausted IAU members still present and voting denied any wish for a recount, after being threatened with deportation to Florida.
Astrophysics in 2006
Another model for non–circular grains has been proposed by Mustoe and DePorter .
Simulation of rotating drum experiments using non-circular particles
DB is supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, and MG in part by the US Dept. of Energy, and in part by the Spanish Ministerio de Educaci ´on, Cultura y Deporte, under program SAB2011-0074.
The strong coupling from tau decays without prejudice
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