dawdler

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n dawdler someone who takes more time than necessary; someone who lags behind
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Dawdler One who wastes time in trifling employments; an idler; a trifler.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n dawdler One who dawdles; a trifler; an idler.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

But that dawdler, Hivert, doesn't come!
"Madame Bovary" by Gustave Flaubert
The handsome, tender-hearted, truthful, susceptible boy was no doubt a dawdler in routine studies, but he assimilated what suited him.
"Washington Irving" by Charles Dudley Warner
The quick movement expressed scorn of dawdlers.
"Uncle William" by Jennette Lee
I have been a boy and a dawdler as yet.
"The History of Pendennis" by William Makepeace Thackeray
A frolicsome youth may leave something to regret in the way of time misspent; but Goethe the man was no dawdler, no easy-going Epicurean.
"Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII" by John Lord
And a weakling, a dawdler like himself, must reply to a hero like that!...
"The Torrent" by Vicente Blasco IbaƱez
I am but a dawdler, a do-nothing, the butt and laughing-stock of all brave men.
"Helmet of Navarre" by Bertha Runkle
The handsome, tender-hearted, truthful, susceptible boy was no doubt a dawdler in routine studies, but he assimilated what suited him.
"Washington Irving" by Charles Dudley Warner
The trifler and dawdler lower the level of democracy by reason of their inefficiency.
"The Vitalized School" by Francis B. Pearson
He had been called a dawdler and a trifler and a do-nothing.
"Under Handicap" by Jackson Gregory
***

In poetry:

Except for this: my love was married
Some weeks before I married you:
While you, my amorous dawdler, tarried
Till we'd been wed a year or two.
"After the Golden Wedding (Three Soliloquies)" by James Kenneth Stephen