cyanogen

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n cyanogen a colorless toxic gas with a pungent almond odor; has been used in chemical warfare
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Not only do apple seeds contain cyanogens, precursors to cyanide, but peach pits, almond skins, citrus fruits and some berrys contain them aswell.
    • n Cyanogen (Chem) A colorless, inflammable, poisonous gas, C2N2, with a peach-blossom odor, so called from its tendency to form blue compounds; obtained by heating ammonium oxalate, mercuric cyanide, etc. It is obtained in combination, forming an alkaline cyanide when nitrogen or a nitrogenous compound is strongly ignited with carbon and soda or potash. It conducts itself like a member of the halogen group of elements, and shows a tendency to form complex compounds. The name is also applied to the univalent radical, CNthe half molecule of cyanogen proper), which was one of the first compound radicals recognized.Cyanogen is found in the commercial substances, potassium cyanide, or prussiate of potash, yellow prussiate of potash, Prussian blue, Turnbull's blue, prussic acid, etc.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n cyanogen Chemical symbol Cy. A compound radical, CN, composed of one atom of nitrogen and one of carbon. This radical cannot exist free, but the double radical (C2N2) exists as a gas called dicyanogen. It is a gas of a strong and peculiar odor, resembling that of crushed peach-leaves, and burning with a rich purple flame. Under a pressure of between three and four atmospheres it becomes a limpid liquid; and it is highly poisonous and irrespirable. It is obtained by heating dry mercury cyanide. It unites with oxygen, hydrogen, and most other non-metallic elements, and also with the metals, forming cyanides. In combination with iron it forms pigments of a dark-blue color, variously called Prussian blue, Chinese blue, Berlin blue, and Turnbull's blue. Also cyan.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Cyanogen sī-an′o-jen a compound of carbon, obtained by decomposing the cyanide of mercury by heat, so called from being an essential ingredient in the formation of Prussian blue
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. ky`anos a dark blue substance + -gen,: cf. F. cyanogène,. So called because it produced blue dyes
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. kyanos, blue.

Usage

In literature:

So called from the circumstance of cyanogen in its combinations with iron performing a leading part in the process.
"The History and Practice of the Art of Photography" by Henry H. Snelling
Cyanide of potassium or cyanogen gas; either would give such an odour.
"The Silent Bullet" by Arthur B. Reeve
The oxides in the thoroughly roasted ore will not amalgamate with mercury, and are not acted on by chlorine or cyanogen.
"Getting Gold" by J. C. F. Johnson
Cyanogenic: applied to repugnatorial glands in myriapods and sometimes in insects.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
This is done in an alkaline solution, generally containing cyanogen and ammonia.
"On Laboratory Arts" by Richard Threlfall
About a year later (1823) Cutbush discussed the formation of cyanogen in processes not previously noticed.
"James Cutbush" by Edgar F. Smith
CYANOGEN SOAP, for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 208, October 22, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 207, October 15, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 212, November 19, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 213, November 26, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 214, December 3, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, No. 209, October 29 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 219, January 7, 1854" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 218, December 31, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 217, December 24, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 215, December 10, 1853" by Various
CYANOGEN SOAP: for removing all kinds of Photographic Stains.
"Notes and Queries, Number 216, December 17, 1853" by Various
That is why in Delaney it had the appearance of cyanogen poisoning.
"The Social Gangster" by Arthur B. Reeve
The case of cyanogen is of peculiar interest.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 10, Slice 4" by Various
Nitrogen, too, though not directly recognized, proves its presence by the lines of cyanogen.
"Are the Planets Inhabited?" by E. Walter Maunder
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In news:

Sudangrass, johnsongrass, sorghums and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids contain cyanogenic glycosides.
But they also contain compounds called cyanogenic glucosides, which convert quickly to prussic acid in plant tissue damaged by frost.
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In science:

The chemical processes responsible for the formation of HCN involves reactions with cyanogen - an observation which was earlier found to be the case in O-rich IK Tau (DCW99).
HCN in the inner envelope of {chi} Cygni
Observations of interstellar molecules and atomic systems, most especially cyanogen (CN), provide a probe of the CMB temperature in narrow wavelength bands at remote locations.
The Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum
The use of interstellar molecules, such as CN (cyanogen), offer a probe of the CMB at a remote location.
The Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum
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