cuttle

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n cuttle ten-armed oval-bodied cephalopod with narrow fins as long as the body and a large calcareous internal shell
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Cuttle (Zoöl) A cephalopod of the genus Sepia, having an internal shell, large eyes, and ten arms furnished with denticulated suckers, by means of which it secures its prey. The name is sometimes applied to dibranchiate cephalopods generally.
    • Cuttle A foul-mouthed fellow. "An you play the saucy cuttle with me."
    • n Cuttle A knife.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n cuttle A cuttlefish.
    • n cuttle Cuttlebone.
    • n cuttle A knife, especially one used by cutpurses or pickpockets.
    • n cuttle Same as cutter, 1 .
    • cuttle To talk; chat.
    • n cuttle A fold or plait of cloth, formed when the piece is done up in layers.
    • cuttle To fold (cloth) in plaits, with the exception of a length at one end, which is wrapped around the plaited part for convenience in unfolding and showing it.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Cuttle kut′l a kind of mollusc, remarkable for its power of ejecting a black inky liquid—also Cutt′le-fish
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. codule, AS. cudele,; akin to G. kuttelfish,; cf. G. kötel, D. keutel, dirt from the guts, G. kuttel, bowels, entrails. AS. cwiþ, womb, Goth. qiþus, belly, womb
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. cudele.

Usage

In literature:

He ranged easily from Handy Andy to Bob Brierly, and from Cuttle to Obenreizer.
"Shadows of the Stage" by William Winter
The food of the sperm consists greatly of the huge rock squid or cuttle-fish, which they swallow in large lumps.
"Natural History of the Mammalia of India and Ceylon" by Robert A. Sterndale
He was often employed in what is called 'cuttling,' that is, drawing cloth from the machine.
"Little Abe" by F. Jewell
Cuttle-bone is not bone, but a structure of pure chalk imbedded loosely in the substance of a species of cuttlefish.
"The Handy Cyclopedia of Things Worth Knowing" by Joseph Triemens
Their ink was sometimes composed of a black liquid emitted by the cuttle fish.
"Roman Antiquities, and Ancient Mythology" by Charles K. Dillaway
In the cuttle-fishes we find an eye even more completely constructed on the vertebrate type than is the ear.
"On the Genesis of Species" by St. George Mivart
Some of them have been seen to vomit lumps of these cuttle-fish as long as a whale-boat.
"Fighting the Whales" by R. M. Ballantyne
I came by surprise the other day on a cuttle-fish in a pool at low tide.
"On the Old Road, Vol. 2 (of 2)" by John Ruskin
Squid and cuttle do very well for us 'bout here.
"Menhardoc" by George Manville Fenn
The aluminium is carefully cleaned by rubbing with a cuttle bone, or fine sand, and strong warm potash.
"On Laboratory Arts" by Richard Threlfall
Cuttle, Jack Bunsby, &c. testified for the prosecution, and Fairweather, Westwind, Brother Jonathan and Mr.
"Glances at Europe" by Horace Greeley
Walter, his uncle, and Captain Cuttle, might stand over.
"The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete" by John Forster
A name of a kind of cuttle-fish.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
Crabs or lobsters, cuttle-fish, jelly-fish, star-fish, oysters, snails, and worms lived contemporary with the first vertebrates.
"The Christian Foundation, Or, Scientific and Religious Journal, Volume 1, January, 1880" by Various
Suddenly a wet, icy mouth, like that of a dead cuttle-fish, shapeless, jelly-like, fell over mine.
"Black Spirits and White" by Ralph Adams Cram
That means, as we fishes describe it, a kind of cuttle or ink-fish among men.
"Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen" by Hans Christian Andersen
Get him some scraped cuttle-fish bone, if he will eat it, and rub on a little vaseline, and on a bright day get him to bathe.
"Little Folks (November 1884)" by Various
The natural was made from a black earth, or from the secretion of the cuttle-fish, sepia.
"Museum of Antiquity" by L. W. Yaggy
OF A CUTTLE-FISH AND HIS SQUIRT.
"Somehow Good" by William de Morgan
The sound seemed to issue from the mansion of Lord Cuttle-fish, the palace physician.
"Japanese Fairy World" by William Elliot Griffis
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