curtal

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj curtal (obsolete) cut short "a dog with a curtal tail"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Curtal A horse with a docked tail; hence, anything cut short.
    • a Curtal Curt; brief; laconic. "Essays and curtal aphorisms."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • curtal Short; cut short; abridged; brief; scant.
    • n curtal A horse or dog with a docked tall: hence applied to a person mutilated in any way.
    • n curtal A short cannon.
    • n curtal A musical instrument of the bassoon kind. Also written courtal, courtel, corthal, cortand, courtant.
    • curtal To cut short; curtail.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Curtal kur′tal a horse with a curt or docked tail: anything docked or cut short
    • adj Curtal docked or shortened
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. courtault, F. courtaud, having a docked tail (cf. It. cortaldo,), fr. court, short, L. curtus,. See Curt, and Curtail

Usage

In literature:

Gasping with fury, he drew back his horse, flung his great sword at his opponent's head, and once more plunged at him, wielding his curtal-axe.
"Burlesques" by William Makepeace Thackeray
COURTEAU, curtal, small horse with docked tail.
"Volpone; Or, The Fox" by Ben Jonson
COURTEAU, curtal, small horse with docked tail.
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
COURTEAU, curtal, small horse with docked tail.
"The Poetaster" by Ben Jonson
COURTEAU, curtal, small horse with docked tail.
"Sejanus: His Fall" by Ben Jonson
COURTEAU, curtal, small horse with docked tail.
"Every Man In His Humor" by Ben Jonson
I with `gallant curtal axe,' dressed as a youth.
"Valerie" by Frederick Marryat
Now I may go in and out as I will, being a curtal friar and not now remembered in these parts.
"Robin Hood" by Paul Creswick
Here is a thong indeed, by the mass, though ich speak it; Tom Tankard's great bald curtal, I think, could not break it!
"Gammer Gurton's Needle" by Mr. S. Mr. of Art
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In poetry:

To see the poverty of man! he still
Receives but curtall'd happinesse, his skill
Makes him not capable of a full store,
But if he have some, he must want the more.
"To Mr. Holiday Archdeacon of Oxon: from Flower 1625" by Robert Gomersall