cucking stool

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n cucking stool an instrument of punishment consisting of a chair in which offenders were ducked in water
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Cucking stool A kind of chair formerly used for punishing scolds, and also dishonest tradesmen, by fastening them in it, usually in front of their doors, to be pelted and hooted at by the mob, but sometimes to be taken to the water and ducked; -- called also a castigatory, a tumbrel, and a trebuchet; and often, but not so correctly, a ducking stool.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Cf. AS. scealfingstōl, a word of similar meaning, allied to scealfor, a diver, mergus avis; or possibly from F. coquine, a hussy, slut, jade, f. of coquin, OE. cokin, a rascal; or cf. Icel. kka, to dung, kkr, dung, the name being given as to a disgracing or infamous punishment

Usage

In literature:

CUCKING-STOOL, used for the ducking of scolds, etc.
"Volpone; Or, The Fox" by Ben Jonson
CUCKING-STOOL, used for the ducking of scolds, etc.
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
CUCKING-STOOL, used for the ducking of scolds, etc.
"The Poetaster" by Ben Jonson
CUCKING-STOOL, used for the ducking of scolds, etc.
"Sejanus: His Fall" by Ben Jonson
CUCKING-STOOL, used for the ducking of scolds, etc.
"Every Man In His Humor" by Ben Jonson
This was called a "cucking-stool," and was used to duck scolds or brawlers.
"English Villages" by P. H. Ditchfield
The cucking-stool is suspended over a river or a pond, the woman seated on it.
"The Man Who Laughs" by Victor Hugo
Rogues and vagabonds are often stocked and whipped; scolds are ducked upon cucking-stools in the water.
"Chronicle and Romance (The Harvard Classics Series)" by Jean Froissart, Thomas Malory, Raphael Holinshed
In the year 1572 Kingston got a new cucking stool; the Kingston scolds had become past bearing.
"Highways and Byways in Surrey" by Eric Parker
In some places the term thewe was used for a cucking-stool.
"Bygone Punishments" by William Andrews
Rogues and vagabonds are often stocked and whipped; scolds are ducked upon cucking-stools in the water.
"Elizabethan England" by William Harrison
The cucking-stool was not abolished until 1750, which some think was a hundred years too soon.
"A Month in Yorkshire" by Walter White
He will have thee to the cucking-stool for a scold, an' thou treat him to such words as thou hast treated me!
"True Stories of Girl Heroines" by Evelyn Everett-Green
The cucking-stool or tumbrell.
"An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language" by John Jamieson
The old English cucking-stool for shrews is well known; it was common abroad also, with some customs peculiarly foreign.
"Curiosities of Olden Times" by S. Baring-Gould
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