Crucifixion

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n crucifixion the infliction of extremely painful punishment or suffering
    • n crucifixion the act of executing by a method widespread in the ancient world; the victim's hands and feet are bound or nailed to a cross
    • n Crucifixion the death of Jesus by crucifixion
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Crucifixion Intense suffering or affliction; painful trial. "Do ye prove
      What crucifixions are in love?"
    • Crucifixion The act of nailing or fastening a person to a cross, for the purpose of putting him to death; the use of the cross as a method of capital punishment.
    • Crucifixion The state of one who is nailed or fastened to a cross; death upon a cross.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n crucifixion The act of fixing to a cross, or the state of being stretched on a cross: an ancient Oriental mode of inflicting the death-penalty, applied in rare instances by the Greeks and more commonly by the Romans, by both Greeks and Romans considered an infamous form of death, and reserved in general for slaves and highway robbers. Among the Romans, the instrument of death was properly either a cross in the form now familiar, or the cross known as St. Andrew's; sometimes a standing tree was made to serve the purpose. The person executed was attached to the cross either by nails driven through the hands and feet or by cords, and was left to die of exhaustion or received the mercy of a quicker death, according to circumstances.
    • n crucifixion Specifically The putting to death of Christ upon the cross on the hill of Calvary.
    • n crucifixion Hence Intense suffering or affliction; great mental trial.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Crucifixion death on the cross, esp. that of Christ
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Quotations

  • Simone Weil
    Simone%20Weil
    “Every time that I think of the crucifixion of Christ, I commit the sin of envy.”

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. crucifier—L. crucifigĕre, crucifixumcrux, and figĕre, to fix.

Usage

In literature:

Mario, it is the second Crucifixion.
"The Orchard of Tears" by Sax Rohmer
The inevitable result is mistakes and the crucifixion of themselves as well as of the Scriptures.
"Commentary on Genesis, Vol. II" by Martin Luther
Ulysses, fastened to the mast of his ship, was supposed to present some faint resemblance to the crucifixion.
"Museum of Antiquity" by L. W. Yaggy
But this might have been done without the betrayal, the trial, and the crucifixion.
"The Doctrines of Predestination, Reprobation, and Election" by Robert Wallace
It is a painting of the Crucifixion by Guido.
"Pilgrimage from the Alps to the Tiber" by James Aitken Wylie
As a boy growing up among Muslims, Daoud had renounced belief in the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus.
"The Saracen: Land of the Infidel" by Robert Shea
Oh, what crucifixion I've brought you to!
"Sunlight Patch" by Credo Fitch Harris
They wash their hands like Pilate (not always to cleanliness) and permit the crucifixion.
"Chit-Chat; Nirvana; The Searchlight" by Mathew Joseph Holt
Prayer is one form of crucifixion, of our fellowship with Christ's Cross, of our giving up our flesh to the death.
"The Ministry of Intercession" by Andrew Murray
The Chapel of the Crucifixion was on our right, above us, in the second story of the church.
"Out-of-Doors in the Holy Land" by Henry Van Dyke
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In poetry:

It really ain’t the place nor time
To reel off rhyming diction ;
But yet we’ll write a final rhyme
While waiting crucifixion.
"Butchered to make a Dutchman's Holiday" by Harry Breaker Morant
He scowls purse-lipped. She yawns, and throws
Her arms in scarecrow crucifixion.
Clear of the hills, light’s wafer shows
In world-without-end benediction.
"Daybreak" by Gwen Harwood
Sir Hugo paused, and his face was ashen,
His white lips trembled in silent prayer—
God’s pity soften the spirit’s passion
When the crucifixion of Love is there!
"Sir Hugo's Choice" by James Jeffrey Roche

In news:

Palm Sunday marks for Christians, Jesus Christ's entrance into Jerusalem, when his followers laid palm branches in his path, prior to his crucifixion.
The passionflower vine is a native of the Western hemisphere, named for symbolic connections drawn between its appearance and the crucifixion of Jesus.
The depiction of Pontius Pilate presenting Christ to the crowd awaiting his crucifixion is one of meticulous, tightly focused realism .
More than 100 Catholics took to the streets of Calwa Friday to reenact Jesus' crucifixion.
From his trial to his crucifixion the final moments of Jesus' life, known as Stations of the Cross , played out in the streets of Calwa.
Michelangelo's Last Paintings: The Conversion of St Paul and the Crucifixion of St Peter in the Cappella Paolina, Vatican Palace by Leo Steinberg Oxford University Press, 64 pp.
Before Jesus' crucifixion he mentioned two prepared places.
NBC NEWS — Thousands of Christian pilgrims marched through Jerusalem's old city this morning, Friday, April 6, walking along the route they believe Christ took as he walked to his crucifixion.
In "Way of the Cross" processions and crucifixion reenactments, Christians remembered Jesus' death on Good Friday .
In "Way of the Cross" processions and crucifixion reenactments, Christians remembered Jesus' death on Good Friday.
Christian pilgrims filled the cobblestone alleyways of old Jerusalem to mark Good Friday, commemorating Jesus' crucifixion in the city two millennia ago.
Creation Is Crucifixion Confessions of A Soothsayer In_Silico.
Les Cheveldayoff, portrays Jesus during a performance of the crucifixion at the Holy Land Experience, a Christian-themed attraction in Orlando, Fla.
Tóibín's account, told in Mary 's straightforward, low-key retrospective voice, depicts an elderly woman reliving the harrowing events before, during and immediately after Jesus' crucifixion.
Then I reflect more and realize that -- in a symbolic sense -- crucifixion is all around us.
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