crinoline

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n crinoline a stiff coarse fabric used to stiffen hats or clothing
    • n crinoline a full stiff petticoat made of crinoline fabric
    • n crinoline a skirt stiffened with hoops
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Crinoline A kind of stiff cloth, used chiefly by women, for underskirts, to expand the gown worn over it; -- so called because originally made of hair.
    • Crinoline A lady's skirt made of any stiff material; latterly, a hoop skirt.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n crinoline A stiff material originally made wholly or in part of horsehair, whence the name. It was used about 1852 for stiff skirts, and, when this fashion was followed by that of wearing greatly projecting skirts of wire or steel springs, the word continued to be used generally for the latter. Crinoline is still in use for stiff lining and the like, in the manner of buckram.
    • n crinoline Hence A skirt made of this stuff or of any stiffened or starched material.
    • n crinoline A framework of fine steel or other hoops or springs, used for distending the dress; a hoop-skirt. See farthingale and hoop-skirt.
    • crinoline Pertaining to or resembling a crinoline in structure.
    • n crinoline A contrivance worn by divers in deep water to enable them to breathe more freely. It is placed round the body and tied in front of the stomach.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Crinoline krin′o-lin a name originally given by the French modistes to a stiff fabric of horse-hair, employed to distend women's attire: a hooped petticoat or skirt made to project all round by means of steel-wire: a netting round ships as a guard against torpedoes
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F., fr. crin, hair,L. crinis,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr., crin—L. crinis, hair, and lin—L. linum, flax.

Usage

In literature:

The other elephant had on crinoline.
"The Gorilla Hunters" by R.M. Ballantyne
Don't be afraid of the crinoline, my boy.
"The False Chevalier" by William Douw Lighthall
No woman, whatever her age or position or her opinion about the crinoline fashion, could avoid wearing one.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
Women have never been so much respected since crinolines went out of fashion.
"Peter and Jane" by S. (Sarah) Macnaughtan
Lady Macbeth now appeared, in a silk dress of the latest fashion, expanded by the amplest of crinolines.
"The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 87, January, 1865" by Various
I am ready to own anything you like, that you don't wear crinolines at all, if that will please you.
"The Third Miss Symons" by Flora Macdonald Mayor
Give the little boy a cigar, and the little girl a new crinoline; they like that much better.
"Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen" by Hans Christian Andersen
Or travel far afoot in crinoline?
"Desert Dust" by Edwin L. Sabin
But Maryanne wore her hoops as a duchess wears her crinoline.
"The Struggles of Brown, Jones, and Robinson" by Anthony Trollope
She is a polking polyglot, a Creuzer in crinoline.
"The Essays of "George Eliot" Complete" by George Eliot
Bob Sasnett figured as the first candidate in Jordan County who would run for office on the crinoline ticket.
"The Co-Citizens" by Corra Harris
One thing about her dress most in contrast with that of the other servants was that she evidently wore no crinoline.
"Household Papers and Stories" by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Behind her sounded a faint patter of crinoline coming down the hall stairs.
"John March, Southerner" by George W. Cable
Who would to-day wear the crinoline?
"The Intelligence of Woman" by W. L. George
How long should a lady's crinoline be made?
"The Handbook of Conundrums" by Edith B. Ordway
It needed but Jeff in crinoline bringing up the rear, to show the last of the said chivalry.
"An Artilleryman's Diary" by Jenkin Lloyd Jones
Crinoline figure (Kandler), Pate-dure.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 6" by Various
And to-day she did not wear that detestable crinoline.
"The Progressionists, and Angela." by Conrad von Bolanden
Saw off her legs and give her no crinoline!
"The Land of Lost Toys" by Juliana Horatia Ewing
They all belonged to the "lords of creation," with the exception of two who were of the gentle sex, that wears crinoline.
"Three Months Abroad" by Anna Vivanti
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In poetry:

Whan a lad wi' a lassie forgethers yenoo,
It's no her bricht een, or her rosie wee mou',
Her snod cockernony, waist jimpy an' fine,
That first tak's his e'e—it's the big crinoline!
"Crinoline" by Janet Hamilton
They're aye i' my e'e, an' they're aye i' my gate—
At the kirk I am chirtit maist oot o' my seat;
Whan caul', tae the ingle I needna gae ben,
If Kate an' her crinoline's on the fire-en'.
"Crinoline" by Janet Hamilton
When a widow was burnt i' the Indian suttees,
Tae honour the dead, and the fause gods tae please,
The puir heathen body I'm pincht tae accuse,
Whan I read o' they crinoline deaths i' the news.
"Crinoline" by Janet Hamilton
Sae aff wi' the whalebone, the cane, an' the steel!
I likna the crinoline, trouth an' atweel;
It's fule-like an' fashous, it's cheatrie an' boss—
I wad jist ha'e yere cleedin' bien, genty, an' doss.
"Crinoline" by Janet Hamilton
Tae sae that he likes it would jist be a lee—
But ye ken that the big thing attracts aye the wee—
An' the lass that cares nocht 'bout her heart an' her heid,
Tak's care that her crinoline's weel spread abreed.
"Crinoline" by Janet Hamilton

In news:

Looking for a crinoline slip.
Any idea of where I can find a knee length Crinoline slip.
"The Marvelous Wonderettes" takes you to the 1958 Springfield High School prom where we meet the Wonderettes — four girls with hopes and dreams as big as their crinolines.
For dress-up, we wore poodle-type skirts flared out with crinolines.
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