crenel

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v crenel supply with battlements
    • n crenel a notch or open space between two merlons in a crenelated battlement
    • n crenel one of a series of rounded projections (or the notches between them) formed by curves along an edge (as the edge of a leaf or piece of cloth or the margin of a shell or a shriveled red blood cell observed in a hypertonic solution etc.)
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Crenel An embrasure or indentation in a battlement; a loophole in a fortress; an indentation; a notch. See Merlon, and Illust. of Battlement.
    • Crenel (Bot) Same as Crenature.
    • n Crenel See Crenelle.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n crenel The peak at the top of a helmet.
    • n crenel Same as crenelle.
    • n crenel In botany, a tooth of a crenate leaf; a crenature.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Crenel (archit.) an opening in a parapet for shooting through: a battlement—dim. Cren′elet
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. crenel, F. crneau, LL. crenellus, kernellus, dim. (prob.) fr. L. crena, notch. See Crenny
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—Low L. crena, a notch.

Usage

In literature:

They had hanged him from Tilia's crenellated balcony.
"The Saracen: The Holy War" by Robert Shea
He looked out over the crenelated wall, but the cold moonlight revealed a vacant street.
"Peter the Brazen" by George F. Worts
The King's barge was already illuminating the crenellated arch at the top of the river steps.
"The Fifth Queen" by Ford Madox Ford
In form it resembles a large farm yard, entirely walled in and crenellated.
"Notes in North Africa" by W. G. Windham
It has a flat roof with a crenelated parapet.
"A Journal of Impressions in Belgium" by May Sinclair
Two massive square towers, crenelated at the top and pierced by a few round-headed windows, flank the western front.
"The Cathedrals of Northern Spain" by Charles Rudy
In medieval times no one could "crenellate" a building without special licence from his supreme lord.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 6" by Various
DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE: LICENCES TO CRENELLATE.
"Notes and Queries, Number 228, March 11, 1854" by Various
A multitude of domes and crenelated walls grew into immense proportions beneath the boundless light.
"The Goddess of Atvatabar" by William R. Bradshaw
He put on his coat, which had been lying across one of the crenelations, and covered his head with a small soft hat.
"The Siege of the Seven Suitors" by Meredith Nicholson
But you noticed the crenelated wall: that is the secret.
"World's End" by Richard Jefferies
It had four great towers, crenelated and machicolated, after the best Gothic fortresses of the time.
"Castles and Chateaux of Old Touraine and the Loire Country" by Francis Miltoun
The great walls of the belfry are three feet thick, and the roof was probably battlemented or crenellated.
"Virginia Architecture in the Seventeenth Century" by Henry Chandlee Forman
In order to avoid crossing the centre of the town, they followed the crenellated wall by an almost deserted road.
"Strange Stories from the Lodge of Leisures" by Unknown
The massive walls are crenellated and supported by stout square buttresses.
"Southern Spain" by A.F. Calvert
The walls are of brick, 22 feet high, and crenelated at the top, where they are 3-1/2 feet broad.
"Siam" by George B. Bacon
Great crenellated ramparts, cyclopean, superb, follow the curve of the cliff.
"In Morocco" by Edith Wharton
As its name, Pont-Carre, indicated, it was square, and was flanked by four crenelated towers and surrounded by a broad moat.
"The Memoirs of Jacques Casanova de Seingalt, Vol. IV (of VI), "Adventures In The South" The First Complete and Unabridged English Translation, Illustrated with Old Engravings" by Jacques Casanova de Seingalt
The wind moaned about the crenelated turrets; sentinels of the Pisans stood everywhere, alert for ambush.
"The Hill of Venus" by Nathan Gallizier
It dates from 1346, when William de Clynton, Earl of Huntingdon, obtained licence to crenellate.
"British Castles" by Charles H. Ashdown
***

In science:

Owing to its suggestive shape, we will refer to the set of points in a simple permutation other than the isolated points in Figure 2 as the crenellation.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
The “isolated” (numbered) points must be present, and define the shape of the rest of the permutation, which we will call the crenellation.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
The crenellation can consist of arbitrarily many line segments, and each segment can contain any number of elements, but these must be placed in such a way as to avoid creating intervals.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
The labels A and B mark the two different types of sides of the crenellation and are referred to in the proof of Theorem 3.4.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
Note that the top row of dots, and the top of each crenellation are left to right maxima, while the bottom row of dots and the bottom of each crenellation are right to left minima.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
So that role must be played by two elements from the sides of a crenellation, and from different sides since an individual side is decreasing.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
Similarly, in a purported 35142 pattern, the 4 must come from a side of a crenellation.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
First we check that the 3 could come from the side of a crenellation.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
Since this is a left to right maximum it must come from an isolated point in the top group or the top of a crenellation.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
We divide the crenellation into blocks of three line segments at a time, as shown in Figure 3.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
Next, if I contains no points encoded by d, then I consists entirely of points within one line segment of the crenellation: since the repeated factors aa, bb and cc are forbidden, the only possibility is that I consists of the last point (encoded by c) from one block, and the first point (encoded by a) from the next.
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
By a similar argument, points encoded by d which lie above the crenellation can be inflated by any permutation from Av(312), and those below by any permutation in Av(231).
Enumerating indices of Schubert varieties defined by inclusions
***